Click here to load reader

人工智慧 50 年 By Shang-Sheng Jeng 思索指南 Why not in traditional chinese character? 什麼是智慧 ? IQ (Intelligence Quotient, 智慧商數 ) EQ (Emotional Quotient, 情緒商數

  • View
    241

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of 人工智慧 50 年 By Shang-Sheng Jeng 思索指南 Why not in traditional chinese character?...

  • Slide 1
  • Slide 2
  • 50 By Shang-Sheng Jeng
  • Slide 3
  • Slide 4
  • Why not in traditional chinese character? ? IQ (Intelligence Quotient, ) EQ (Emotional Quotient, ) SQ (Spirit Quotient, ) AQ (Adversity Quotient, ) MQ (Moral Quotient, )
  • Slide 5
  • CQ (Creative Quotient, ) FQ (Financial Quotient, ) LQ (Lucky Quotient, ) Nature Intelligence, Human Intelligence Vs. Artificial Intelligence
  • Slide 6
  • Prologue ? 1956 Dartmouth Conference 50
  • Slide 7
  • 21 Epilogue
  • Slide 8
  • Prologue
  • Slide 9
  • Change and Competition is the Essence of this Real World "The Only Constant in Life is Change! An Old Dogs Feeling
  • Slide 10
  • Competition comes from Civilization Conflict-- War of Value and Lifestyle (media industry, cultural industry) Military Conflict-- Global Governance and Nation Building (military industry and energy industry) Financial Conflict-- Scarcity and Divide, Hidden Power of Capitalism (financial industry and trust industry)
  • Slide 11
  • : , , .
  • Slide 12
  • The Power to define The Battlefield
  • Slide 13
  • "ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." John 8:32
  • Slide 14
  • ? The Trends of 5Ms, 5Cs and 4Ps The Future of Civilization Transition
  • Slide 15
  • My Observation: 5Ms, 5Cs and 4Ps Development Path by Shang-Sheng Jeng, It originated around 1994 at MIC III
  • Slide 16
  • 5Ms: Free Flow for Globalization Material Merchandize Manpower Money Message (information and command)
  • Slide 17
  • 5Ms: Free Flow for Globalization The Competition Platform The Competition Factor The Competition Infrastructure The Competition of Global Governance
  • Slide 18
  • 5 Cs Theory Computer Communication Content Consumerization Control
  • Slide 19
  • Computer Devices Calculation Processing Application Services Agent
  • Slide 20
  • Communication Local Area Network Wide Area Network Metropolitan Area Network Wireless Network Satellite Network Broadcasting network P2P Network
  • Slide 21
  • Communication Home Network Body Network Wireless Sensor Network Extraterrestrial Network
  • Slide 22
  • Content Information Production Information Representation Information Search Information Retrieval Information Distribution Information Storage Information Exchange
  • Slide 23
  • Consumerization Mass Momentum Power Networked Effect Procsumer Phenomena M form Society, Web 2.0, Google style, We are here now, 1995 ~ 2020
  • Slide 24
  • Control Automation Intelligence Sensors Environmental Surveillance Robotics, Digital Warriors, Unmanned Arial Vehicle, DARPA the Grand Challenge, DARPA the Urban Challenge
  • Slide 25
  • Control September 14, 2006 The Air Force has announced "Reaper" has been chosen as the name for the MQ-9 unmanned aerial vehicle, the Air Force's first hunter-killer UAV.
  • Slide 26
  • Control: C4KISR (pronounced C4-Kisser) C4ISR + Kill ( ) = C4KISR C4ISR: , , , , , , Find, track and precisely identify targets Dynamically command and control weapons and sensors Share information
  • Slide 27
  • 4 Place-- Digitization and Networking Working Place Movable Place (now) Walking On a Moving Machine Home Place (will in) Ubiquitous (Infrastructure)
  • Slide 28
  • Passions of Information Engineers Push Cross-Industry Competition Computer and Computer enabled Services Industry (Moores Law) Communication and Connectivity Industry (RFC, de facto approach) Content (Information search, Yahoo, Google), Publication (YouTube, Wikipedia), Education (Open Courseware) and Entertainment (Napster) Industry
  • Slide 29
  • Passions of Information Engineers Push Cross-Industry Competition Consumer Industry (Digitalized, mp3, mp4, digital camera and Networktized, Gmail, Google Earth,)
  • Slide 30
  • Passions of Information Engineers Push Institution Revolution E-Government E-Commerce E-Community E-X,
  • Slide 31
  • The Future of Civilization Transition The Agriculture Civilization The Industry Civilization The Mechanical Industry Civilization The Electronic Industry Civilization The Information Civilization
  • Slide 32
  • The Driving Force in Civilization Transition Energy Technology Knowledge
  • Slide 33
  • What is AI? The ability of a computer or other machine to perform those activities that are normally thought to require intelligence.
  • Slide 34
  • What is AI? (AAAI) The scientific understanding of the mechanisms underlying thought and intelligent behavior and their embodiment in machines."
  • Slide 35
  • What is AI? (John McCarthy, November 24, 2004) It is the science and engineering of making intelligent machines, especially intelligent computer programs. It is related to the similar task of using computers to understand human intelligence, but AI does not have to confine itself to methods that are biologically observable.
  • Slide 36
  • Branches of AI (John McCarthy) logical AI, search, pattern recognition, representation, inference, common sense knowledge and reasoning, learning from experience, planning, epistemology, epistemology, heuristics, genetic programming
  • Slide 37
  • What is AI?What is AI? (Dr. Dobbs) AI divides roughly into two schools of thought: Conventional AI and Computational Intelligence.
  • Slide 38
  • Conventional AI Conventional AI mostly involves methods now classified as machine learning, characterized by formalism and statistical analysis. This is also known as symbolic AI, logical AI, neat AI and Good Old Fashioned Artificial Intelligence (GOFAI).
  • Slide 39
  • Conventional AI Methods include: Expert systems: apply reasoning capabilities to reach a conclusion. An expert system can process large amounts of known information and provide conclusions based on them. Expert systems Case based reasoning (Roger Shank) Case based reasoning Bayesian networks Behavior based AI: a modular method building AI systems by hand. (Rodney Brooks) Behavior based AI
  • Slide 40
  • Computational Intelligence Computational Intelligence involves iterative development or learning (e.g. parameter tuning e.g. in connectionist systems). Learning is based on empirical data and is associated with non-symbolic AI, scruffy AI and soft computing.
  • Slide 41
  • Computational Intelligence Methods include: Neural networks: systems with very strong pattern recognition capabilities. Neural networks Fuzzy systems: techniques for reasoning under uncertainty, have been widely used in modern industrial and consumer product control systems. (Lotfi A. Zadeh) Fuzzy systems
  • Slide 42
  • Computational Intelligence Evolutionary computation: applies biologically inspired concepts such as populations, mutation and survival of the fittest to generate increasingly better solutions to the problem. These methods most notably divide into evolutionary algorithms (e.g. genetic algorithms) and swarm intelligence (e.g. ant algorithms) (Gerardo Beni and Jing Wang ). Evolutionary computationevolutionary algorithmsswarm intelligence
  • Slide 43
  • Strong AI vs. Weak AI (wikipedia) Strong AI vs. Weak AI debates the supposition that some forms of artificial intelligence can truly reason and solve problems. Strong AI supposes that it is possible for machines to become sapient, or self-aware, but may or may not exhibit human-like thought processes. Weak AI makes no such claim and denies this possibility. The term strong AI was originally coined by John Searle.
  • Slide 44
  • Intelligence Study from: Mythology Philosophy Psychology Mathematics Computer Engineering
  • Slide 45
  • Philosophy of AI Can we build intelligent machines? If we do, how will we know they re intelligent? Should we build intelligent machines? If we do, how should we treat them and how will they treat us?
  • Slide 46
  • Information of this section copied From wikipedia AI History
  • Slide 47
  • Greek myths of Hephaestus and Pygmalion incorporate the idea of intelligent robots. In the 5th century BC, Aristotle invented syllogistic logic, the first formal deductive reasoning system. Ramon Llull, Spanish theologian, invented paper "machines" for discovering nonmathematical truths through combinations of words from lists in the 13th century.
  • Slide 48
  • By the 15th century and 16th century, clocks, the first modern measuring machines, were first produced using lathes. Clockmakers extended their craft to creating mechanical animals and other novelties. Rabbi Judah Loew ben Bezalel of Prague is said to have invented the Golem, a clay man brought to life (1580).
  • Slide 49
  • Early in the 17th century, Ren Descartes proposed that bodies of animals are nothing more than complex machines. Many other 17th century thinkers offered varia