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Annotated Bibliography Created by Staci Defibaugh ESL 501 Spring 2012

Annotated Bibliography

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Annotated Bibliography. Created by Staci Defibaugh ESL 501 Spring 2012. What is a bibliography?. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Page 1: Annotated Bibliography

Annotated BibliographyCreated by Staci DefibaughESL 501Spring 2012

Page 2: Annotated Bibliography

What is a bibliography?

•A bibliography is a list of sources that you used (or will use) as references when writing an essay. Each entry in a bibliography is a ‘citation’ or a ‘full citation’ which includes: the name of the author and the source and publication information.

Bibliographies are often called “References” or “Works Cited.”

Page 3: Annotated Bibliography

Example Bibliography

Mufwene, S. (1994). On the status of auxiliary verbs in Gullah. American Speech, 69,

58–70.

Jones-Jackson, P.A. (1984). On Decreolization and Language Death in Gullah.

Language in Society, 13 (3), 351-362.

Pargman, S. (2004). Gullah duh and periphrastic do in English dialects: Another look

at the evidence. American Speech, 79 (1), 3-32.

Taylor, M. & Ouzts, D. (2001). Gullah: A study of language. Reading Improvement,

39 (2), 55-68.

Turner, L.D. (1949). Africanisms in the Gullah Dialect. Chicago: University of

Chicago Press.

Page 4: Annotated Bibliography

What is an annotated bibliography?An annotation is a note of explanation or a

comment.

An annotated bibliography includes the citation (just like a bibliography) but add ‘notes’ of additional information about the source.

Page 5: Annotated Bibliography

Purpose

•A way to organize your research▫Quick reference guide ▫Summaries of all sources in one place

•Allows you to critically analyze sources▫Does it fit within your frame of research?▫Is it a reliable source?

•Makes creating your Bibliography/Reference Page easy

Page 6: Annotated Bibliography

Essential Components• Full Citation (based on the required citation style)• Summary: 3-4 sentences stating the thesis and

main points of the source• Explanation of Relevancy: 3-4 sentences about

how this source helps answer the research question

• *Analysis of the reliability of the source: 1-2 sentences stating why this source is reliable or not

• *Note: this section is not always included in an Annotated Bibliography but will be required for this class

Page 7: Annotated Bibliography

Bibliography vs. Annotated BibliographyBibliography/ Reference page Annotated Bibliography

• Includes only full citation (the reference information: author, year, title, publication information, etc)

• Must be included with any essay/ paper that uses outside sources

• Usually titled, “References” or “Works Cited”

• Includes the reference information (full citation) & information about the article: summary and evaluation

• Does not get submitted with your essay/ paper

• Used as a tool in the research process

Page 8: Annotated Bibliography

ExampleHopper, R. & Drummond, K. (1993). Back channels revisited: Acknowledgement tokens and

speakership incipiency. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 26 (2),157-177.

This article attempts to categorize different back channeling responses, namely ‘yeah’, ‘mm’ and‘hm’ into separate functional responses. Although all function in a way to signal that the speakershould continue speaking ‘yeah’ provides an additional signal that the listener agrees with thespeaker. ‘Mm’ and ‘hm’ both signal that the listener may not be in agreement with the speaker, buthe/she is willing to allow the speaker to continue, with either the hope of the speaker explainingbetter (‘mm’) or with a signal that suggests that the listener is preparing to initiate a turn once thecurrent speaker is finished.

Since I am looking at how listeners signal that they want a turn to speak, I think this will behelpful for me. I want to see if, and how, back channels during a speaker turn can help someoneself-select as next speaker. It would be interesting to see if the use of these 3 backchannelsfunction differently in gaining next speaker turns. If yeah does function differently, we may see‘yeah’ used less often to gain a turn, than ‘mm’ and ‘mm hm.’ Since there have not been manystudies that specifically focus on the relation of backchannels and next speakership, this mayprovide some background information that will help distinguish the different back channelresponses with this function.

This is a reliable source. The authors are experts in their field, the study is based on empirical data, and the journal that the article was published in is well known in the field of Linguistics.

Page 9: Annotated Bibliography

CitationHopper, R. & Drummond, K. (1993). Back channels revisited: Acknowledgement tokens and

speakership incipiency. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 26 (2), 157-177.

This article attempts to categorize different back channeling responses, namely ‘yeah’, ‘mm’ and‘hm’ into separate functional responses. Although all function in a way to signal that the speakershould continue speaking ‘yeah’ provides an additional signal that the listener agrees with thespeaker. ‘Mm’ and ‘hm’ both signal that the listener may not be in agreement with the speaker, buthe/she is willing to allow the speaker to continue, with either the hope of the speaker explainingbetter (‘mm’) or with a signal that suggests that the listener is preparing to initiate a turn once thecurrent speaker is finished.

Since I am looking at how listeners signal that they want a turn to speak, I think this will behelpful for me. I want to see if, and how, back channels during a speaker turn can help someoneself-select as next speaker. It would be interesting to see if the use of these 3 backchannelsfunction differently in gaining next speaker turns. If yeah does function differently, we may see‘yeah’ used less often to gain a turn, than ‘mm’ and ‘mm hm.’ Since there have not been manystudies that specifically focus on the relation of backchannels and next speakership, this mayprovide some background information that will help distinguish the different back channelresponses with this function.

This is a reliable source. The authors are experts in their field, the study is based on empirical data, and the journal that the article was published in is well known in the field of Linguistics.

Page 10: Annotated Bibliography

SummaryHopper, R. & Drummond, K. (1993). Back channels revisited: Acknowledgement tokens and

speakership incipiency. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 26 (2),157-177.

This article attempts to categorize different back channeling responses, namely ‘yeah’, ‘mm’ and‘hm’ into separate functional responses. Although all function in a way to signal that the speakershould continue speaking ‘yeah’ provides an additional signal that the listener agrees with thespeaker. ‘Mm’ and ‘hm’ both signal that the listener may not be in agreement with the speaker,

buthe/she is willing to allow the speaker to continue, with either the hope of the speaker explainingbetter (‘mm’) or with a signal that suggests that the listener is preparing to initiate a turn once thecurrent speaker is finished.

Since I am looking at how listeners signal that they want a turn to speak, I think this will behelpful for me. I want to see if, and how, back channels during a speaker turn can help someoneself-select as next speaker. It would be interesting to see if the use of these 3 backchannelsfunction differently in gaining next speaker turns. If yeah does function differently, we may see‘yeah’ used less often to gain a turn, than ‘mm’ and ‘mm hm.’ Since there have not been manystudies that specifically focus on the relation of backchannels and next speakership, this mayprovide some background information that will help distinguish the different back channelresponses with this function.

This is a reliable source. The authors are experts in their field, the study is based on empirical data,and the journal that the article was published in is well known in the field of Linguistics.

Page 11: Annotated Bibliography

Explanation of RelevanceHopper, R. & Drummond, K. (1993). Back channels revisited: Acknowledgement tokens and

speakership incipiency. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 26 (2), 157-177.

This article attempts to categorize different back channeling responses, namely ‘yeah’, ‘mm’ and‘hm’ into separate functional responses. Although all function in a way to signal that the speakershould continue speaking ‘yeah’ provides an additional signal that the listener agrees with thespeaker. ‘Mm’ and ‘hm’ both signal that the listener may not be in agreement with the speaker, buthe/she is willing to allow the speaker to continue, with either the hope of the speaker explainingbetter (‘mm’) or with a signal that suggests that the listener is preparing to initiate a turn once thecurrent speaker is finished.

Since I am looking at how listeners signal that they want a turn to speak, I think this will behelpful for me. I want to see if, and how, back channels during a speaker turn can help someoneself-select as next speaker. It would be interesting to see if the use of these 3 backchannelsfunction differently in gaining next speaker turns. If yeah does function differently, we may see‘yeah’ used less often to gain a turn, than ‘mm’ and ‘mm hm.’ Since there have not been manystudies that specifically focus on the relation of backchannels and next speakership, this mayprovide some background information that will help distinguish the different back channelresponses with this function.

This is a reliable source. The authors are experts in their field, the study is based on empirical data,and the journal that the article was published in is well known in the field of Linguistics.

Page 12: Annotated Bibliography

Analysis of Reliability Hopper, R. & Drummond, K. (1993). Back channels revisited: Acknowledgement tokens and

speakership incipiency. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 26 (2),157-177.

This article attempts to categorize different back channeling responses, namely ‘yeah’, ‘mm’ and‘hm’ into separate functional responses. Although all function in a way to signal that the speakershould continue speaking ‘yeah’ provides an additional signal that the listener agrees with thespeaker. ‘Mm’ and ‘hm’ both signal that the listener may not be in agreement with the speaker, buthe/she is willing to allow the speaker to continue, with either the hope of the speaker explainingbetter (‘mm’) or with a signal that suggests that the listener is preparing to initiate a turn once thecurrent speaker is finished.

Since I am looking at how listeners signal that they want a turn to speak, I think this will behelpful for me. I want to see if, and how, back channels during a speaker turn can help someoneself-select as next speaker. It would be interesting to see if the use of these 3 backchannelsfunction differently in gaining next speaker turns. If yeah does function differently, we may see‘yeah’ used less often to gain a turn, than ‘mm’ and ‘mm hm.’ Since there have not been manystudies that specifically focus on the relation of backchannels and next speakership, this mayprovide some background information that will help distinguish the different back channelresponses with this function.

This is a reliable source. The authors are experts in their field, the study is based on empirical data,and the journal that the article was published in is well known in the field of Linguistics.

Page 13: Annotated Bibliography

Read the following entries and evaluate the effectiveness of each section. Make notes of what could be added or changed to improve the entry.

Page 14: Annotated Bibliography

Example 1Deutsch, S. (2003). Barbie: The First Thirty Years. 2nd ed. Paducah, KY: Collector Books.

In the book, Deutsch makes a case that Barbie’s influence is global, and not limited only to the United States, or even to the western world. Deutsch accomplishes this by providing detailsabout multicultural Barbies, which look, dress, and even speak in ways that make themappealing to children of many nations. The purpose of her argument is to prove that Barbiehas achieved world wide importance, in order to demonstrate her increased value as acollector’s item. Deutsch is writing primarily to collectors of Barbie dolls, and ironically, itseems that she is writing to American collectors, since collectors in other countries are alreadyaware that Barbie has become more globally popular.

Although I do think that I could use the information that proves Barbie has become morepervasive throughout the world in order to support an argument about the global significanceof Barbie’s controversial influence, this book doesn’t really address any controversial aspectsof Barbie.

Page 15: Annotated Bibliography

Example 2National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division of Nutrition

and Physical Activity (2006). Do increased portion sizes affect how much we eat? Research to Practice Series, 1-4.

 This article mainly argues that the increased portion sizes increase the amount we eat. Bydistinguishing the concepts of portion size and serving size, the author shows us that the sizesof a portion of food are continually increasing nowadays. More than ten studies are cited inthis article to demonstrate that people will more or less eat a larger amount of food if theportion sizes increase. This article is helpful to me because I’m looking at the unhealthy eating styles of Americanpeople. The author has clearly explained that people will eat more with the increasing portionsizes because they seldom care about the serving sizes. The experiments cited in the article canalso be used to illustrate the solution of my research problem. This article is reliable because the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and HealthPromotion and the Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity are authority organizations, andmore than ten experiments powerfully enhance the reliability of the result of this study.

Page 16: Annotated Bibliography

Example 3Rosen, Jeffrey. The end of obscenity." The New Republic July 1996: 6-7.

In this article, Rosen talks about the Internet and the overturn of theCommunications Decency Act. He believes the Philadelphia judges whooverturned this Act deserve credit for enumerating the possibility of oneperson corrupting cyberspace with obscenities, but they did not take intoaccount that the public are the ones who decipher what is considered to beobscenity.

This article is useful to our research because it has to do with language on the

Internet and the censorship of it.

This article appears in a professional publication that targets readersconcerned with law and the government.

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Thesis For the Following Papers• Example #1: The Mattel Barbie has negatively

effected both the role of self esteem of women on a global scale.

• Example #2: In order to achieve a decrease in the percentage of Obese Americans, national education policies promoting healthy eating styles are needed.

• Example #3: Given the increasing amount and influence of social media in today’s world, the government needs to create stricter censorship laws in order to protect American youth from being negatively impacted.