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Chronicle T HE B OSTON C OLLEGE Chronicle MAY 10, 2012 VOL. 20 NO. 17 Published by the Boston College Office of News & Public Affairs QUOTE: INSIDE •‘Voice’ winners, page 2 •Gaelic football at BC, page 2 •Grad students earn fellowships, page 3 •Burke, Zona are promoted, page 3 •Annual “Seniors to Remember” profiles •Simon gift for Law School, page 9 •Q&A with Fr. Clarke, page 5 •Fulton Prize Debate, page 10 •Award named for late student, page 8 •Liturgy Arts Group, page 9 BY JACK DUNN DIRECTOR OF NEWS & PUBLIC AFFAIRS A California real estate investor and former high tech CEO who cites his Jesuit education as a crucial influence in his personal formation and professional success has made a $15 million pledge to name the alumni center at Boston College. Patrick F. Cadigan ’57, the re- tired CEO and President of Elec- tronic Engineering Company of California (EECO), says that the discipline and moral training of his Jesuit teachers were factors that helped him, as the son of Irish im- migrants who worked part-time at his father’s bar in Cambridge to help pay for his education, to be- come one of Southern California’s most successful high tech leaders and real estate investors. His $15 million pledge will re- sult in the June 29 dedication of the Cadigan Alumni Center, a new facility that will house the Univer- sity’s fundraising, alumni relations and parent relations offices. The Cadigan Alumni Center will serve as a home-away-from-home for Boston College’s 162,000 alumni — the largest Catholic alumni as- sociation in the world — and will play host to volunteer meetings, seminars, alumni events and parent receptions. “My education at Boston Col- lege was a great experience that taught me the importance of hard work, and instilled in me values and discipline that stayed with me throughout my years,” said Cadi- gan. “The foundation I received left an indelible impression on me, and prepared me for success in business and in life.” BY ED HAYWARD STAFF WRITER Thaly Germain, a former school principal who has been developing school leaders with the national non-profit New Leaders, has been named the director of the Lynch Leadership Academy, Lynch School of Education In- terim Dean Maureen Kenny an- nounced last week. Germain, the executive direc- tor of Aligned Staff at New York- based New Leaders, will start next month as the director of the lead- ership academy, a one-year devel- opment program for early- and mid-career principals from Bos- ton’s public, Catholic and charter schools. Launched with a $20 mil- lion gift from Carolyn and Peter Lynch, the leadership academy is the first in the nation to bring together school leaders from the three competing sectors of K-12 education for a series of work- shops and programs on leadership development, as well as opportu- nities for networking and collabo- ration. In addition to faculty from the Lynch School, Carroll School BY SEAN SMITH CHRONICLE EDITOR Senior Daniel J. Kennedy doesn’t appear to have had much in the way of alone-time during his Boston College years. The theology and philosophy major from Toledo, Ohio, has spent a multitude of hours work- ing with Campus Ministry, St. Ig- natius Church, the PULSE Coun- cil and the Church in the 21st Century Center Advisory Com- mittee, among others, as well as tutoring at Nativity Preparatory School in Jamaica Plain and twice going on service trips — the sec- ond as leader — with the Arrupe Service and Immersion Program. And Kennedy has a straightfor- ward reason for the degree of his involvement: You can’t make a difference in the world by sitting in your room. “When it comes to social jus- tice, whatever your abilities as an individual, they are never as strong as your ability to work in a community,” he explains. “Your efforts must be in a larger context, because it is through relationships with others that we become fruit- ful human beings.” Kennedy’s devotion to faith $15 Million Gift Gives New Alumni Ctr. a Name 1957 grad Cadigan shows gratitude for his Jesuit education Patrick F. Cadigan ’57 Continued on page 3 Continued on page 8 Continued on page 4 Germain Appointed to Head Lynch Leadership Academy THE FINNEGAN AWARD: ‘EVER TO EXCEL’ Daniel J. Kennedy, 2012 Finnegan Award winner. Christopher Huang Finding Strength in Community pages 6-7 •Mother’s Day concert; E-Teaching Day, page 12 “I miss not being able to speak freely, both in terms of accent and nuance, as I often have to modify much of what I want to say. I miss Aussie sarcasm and wit, suburban rugby games, good coffee, bodysurfing, driving on the left, schooners of Reschs and meat pies...But, for all that, life at the Heights is great and I’m very happy to be here.” —Assistant Professor of History Jeremy Clarke, SJ, page 5 BY ED HAYWARD STAFF WRITER The intense interest in har- vesting energy from heat sources has led to a renewed push to discover materials that can more efficiently convert heat into elec- tricity. Some researchers are find- ing those gains by re-designing materials scientists have been working with for years. Professor of Physics Zhifeng Ren and graduate researcher Bo Yu and colleagues from MIT recently reported in the journal Nano Letters developing a novel, nanotech design that boosts the thermoelectric performance of a bulk alloy semiconductor by 30 to 40 percent above its previ- ously achieved figure of merit, the measuring stick of conversion efficiency in thermoelectrics. The alloy in question, Sili- con Germanium (SiGe), has been valued for its performance in high-temperature thermoelectric applications, including its use in radioisotope thermoelectric gen- erators on NASA flight missions. But broader applications have been limited because of its low thermoelectric performance and the high cost of Germanium. Ren and Yu, working with MIT Professors Gang Chen and Mildred S. Dresselhause and post-doctoral researcher Mona Zebarjadi, report that altering the design of bulk SiGe with Continued on page 8 •Arts Festival photos and reflections, page 12 Physics Researchers’ Redesigned Semiconductor Handles the Heat

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Page 1: Boston College Chronicle

ChronicleThe BosTon College

Chroniclemay 10, 2012 VOL. 20 nO. 17

Published by the Boston College Office of News & Public Affairs

QUOTE:

INSIDE•‘Voice’ winners, page 2

•Gaelic football at BC, page 2

•Grad students earn fellowships, page 3

•Burke, Zona are promoted, page 3

•Annual “Seniors to Remember” profiles

•Simon gift for Law School, page 9

•Q&A with Fr. Clarke, page 5

•Fulton Prize Debate, page 10

•Award named for late student, page 8•Liturgy Arts Group, page 9

By Jack Dunn Director of news & PuBlic affairs

A California real estate investor and former high tech CEO who cites his Jesuit education as a crucial influence in his personal formation and professional success has made a $15 million pledge to name the alumni center at Boston College.

Patrick F. Cadigan ’57, the re-tired CEO and President of Elec-tronic Engineering Company of California (EECO), says that the discipline and moral training of his Jesuit teachers were factors that helped him, as the son of Irish im-migrants who worked part-time at his father’s bar in Cambridge to help pay for his education, to be-come one of Southern California’s most successful high tech leaders and real estate investors.

His $15 million pledge will re-sult in the June 29 dedication of the Cadigan Alumni Center, a new facility that will house the Univer-sity’s fundraising, alumni relations and parent relations offices. The Cadigan Alumni Center will serve

as a home-away-from-home for Boston College’s 162,000 alumni — the largest Catholic alumni as-sociation in the world — and will play host to volunteer meetings, seminars, alumni events and parent receptions.

“My education at Boston Col-lege was a great experience that taught me the importance of hard work, and instilled in me values and discipline that stayed with me throughout my years,” said Cadi-gan. “The foundation I received left an indelible impression on me, and prepared me for success in business and in life.”

By eD HaywarD staff writer

Thaly Germain, a former school principal who has been developing school leaders with the national non-profit New Leaders, has been named the director of the Lynch Leadership Academy, Lynch School of Education In-terim Dean Maureen Kenny an-nounced last week.

Germain, the executive direc-tor of Aligned Staff at New York-based New Leaders, will start next month as the director of the lead-ership academy, a one-year devel-

opment program for early- and mid-career principals from Bos-ton’s public, Catholic and charter schools.

Launched with a $20 mil-lion gift from Carolyn and Peter Lynch, the leadership academy is the first in the nation to bring together school leaders from the three competing sectors of K-12 education for a series of work-shops and programs on leadership development, as well as opportu-nities for networking and collabo-ration. In addition to faculty from the Lynch School, Carroll School

By sean smitH cHronicle eDitor

Senior Daniel J. Kennedy doesn’t appear to have had much in the way of alone-time during his Boston College years.

The theology and philosophy major from Toledo, Ohio, has spent a multitude of hours work-ing with Campus Ministry, St. Ig-natius Church, the PULSE Coun-cil and the Church in the 21st Century Center Advisory Com-mittee, among others, as well as tutoring at Nativity Preparatory School in Jamaica Plain and twice going on service trips — the sec-

ond as leader — with the Arrupe Service and Immersion Program.

And Kennedy has a straightfor-ward reason for the degree of his involvement: You can’t make a difference in the world by sitting in your room.

“When it comes to social jus-tice, whatever your abilities as an individual, they are never as strong as your ability to work in a community,” he explains. “Your efforts must be in a larger context, because it is through relationships with others that we become fruit-ful human beings.”

Kennedy’s devotion to faith

$15 Million Gift Gives New Alumni Ctr. a Name1957 grad Cadigan shows gratitude for his Jesuit education

Patrick F. Cadigan ’57

Continued on page 3

Continued on page 8

Continued on page 4

Germain Appointed to Head Lynch Leadership Academy

THE FINNEGAN AWARD: ‘EVER TO EXCEL’

Daniel J. Kennedy, 2012 Finnegan Award winner.

Chr

isto

pher

Hua

ng

Finding Strength in Community

pages 6-7

•Mother’s Day concert; E-Teaching Day, page 12

“I miss not being able to speak freely, both in terms of accent and nuance, as I often have to modify much of what I want to say. I miss Aussie sarcasm and wit, suburban rugby games, good coffee, bodysurfing, driving on the left, schooners of Reschs and meat pies...But, for all that, life at the Heights is great and I’m very happy to be here.”—Assistant Professor of History Jeremy Clarke, SJ, page 5

By eD HaywarD staff writer

The intense interest in har-vesting energy from heat sources has led to a renewed push to discover materials that can more efficiently convert heat into elec-tricity. Some researchers are find-ing those gains by re-designing materials scientists have been working with for years.

Professor of Physics Zhifeng Ren and graduate researcher Bo Yu and colleagues from MIT recently reported in the journal Nano Letters developing a novel, nanotech design that boosts the thermoelectric performance of a bulk alloy semiconductor by 30 to 40 percent above its previ-

ously achieved figure of merit, the measuring stick of conversion efficiency in thermoelectrics.

The alloy in question, Sili-con Germanium (SiGe), has been valued for its performance in high-temperature thermoelectric applications, including its use in radioisotope thermoelectric gen-erators on NASA flight missions. But broader applications have been limited because of its low thermoelectric performance and the high cost of Germanium.

Ren and Yu, working with MIT Professors Gang Chen and Mildred S. Dresselhause and post-doctoral researcher Mona Zebarjadi, report that altering the design of bulk SiGe with

Continued on page 8

•Arts Festival photos and reflections, page 12

Physics Researchers’ Redesigned Semiconductor Handles the Heat

Page 2: Boston College Chronicle

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The BosTon College

Chroniclemay 10, 2012

DIrEctor of NEWS & PublIc AffAIrS

Jack DunnDEPuty DIrEctor of NEWS

& PublIc AffAIrS

Patricia DelaneyEDItor

Sean SmithcoNtrIbutINg StAff

Melissa Beecher

Ed Hayward

Reid Oslin

Rosanne Pellegrini

Kathleen Sullivan

Michael Maloney

PhotogrAPhErS

Gary Gilbert

Lee Pellegrini

The Boston College Chronicle (USPS 009491), the internal newspaper for faculty and staff, is published biweekly from September to May by Boston Col-lege, with editorial offices at the Office of News & Public Affairs, 14 May-flower Road, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (617)552-3350. Distributed free to fac-ulty and staff offices and other locations on campus. Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA and additional mailing offic-es. POSTMASTER: send address changes to The Boston College Chronicle, Office of News & Public Affairs, 14 Mayflower Road, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467.

Contact Chronicle via e-mail: [email protected] editions of the Bos-ton College Chronicle are available via the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/chronicle.

The BosTon College

Chronicle

The BosTon College

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A

R O

U N D C A M P U S

After an overwhelming response to its call for submissions, the Office of News & Public Affairs has selected six students to be “The Voice” of Boston College’s Sesquicentennial Mobile Cam-pus Tour, “Tour of the Heights.”

The voice talent of the six students will be featured prominently on the mobile site and app, which is currently in development and will be unveiled in September.

The six students are: Nick Benevenia ’14, an English and economics major from New Providence, NJ; Katie Tusch ’13, a communication major from Stamford, Conn.; Gregory Sacharoff ’12, a communication major from Glen Rock, NJ; Elise Hudson ’12, a theatre arts and human development major from Nashville; Keady Segal ’15 a communication major from Rockport, Mass.; and Karen Shu ’14, a psychology and communication major from Chelmsford, Mass.

Boston College is renowned for its Irish heritage, and for its various Irish-oriented initiatives, programs and resources. Now, a student group hopes to add a new element to BC’s Irish character: Irish sports.

The Irish Society, which aims to promote Irish culture at BC, has held weekly gatherings during this academic year on the Brigh-ton Campus to learn and play Gaelic football, one of the most popular sports in Ireland. The stu-dents held drills to become familiar in the finer points of the game — which includes aspects of soccer and rugby, among other sports — and followed with an intramural scrimmage.

For most of the participants, Gaelic football is a means of deep-ening their familial and personal ties to Ireland.

But Oisín Kenny ’12, who has served as Irish Society president during this year, notes that the opportunity is open to everyone, Irish or not.

“It’s a great way to get exercise — which we know is very impor-tant when you’re a student dealing with all the demands of college life — and to make some new friends.

“Gaelic football is not just a sport, though,” adds Kenny, a na-tive of nearby Needham whose parents both came from Ireland. “There is so much history and tradition associated with it — it’s imbued with Irishness. At BC, we are lucky to have music, dance, literature, art, history and other facets of Ireland. So, our feeling is, why not celebrate Ireland’s sport-ing life, too?”

On one recent Sunday after-noon, about 20 — perhaps a third of them women — Irish Society members and friends trotted out on the Brighton Campus athlet-

ic fields for what was likely to be their last go-round of Gaelic football before the academic year’s end. Kenny helped instruct the less experienced players on passing and advancing the ball, while the veterans went through their more advanced paces.

One of the latter, senior Kev-in McGovern, spent many of his childhood summers in Ireland, and when not helping his grandparents and uncles on the farm would play Gaelic football with his cousins at the local playing field or “pitch.” On weekends, he and his family would bond by watching Gaelic football championships on televi-sion.

“These memories instilled a passion in me to find a community at BC where I could share the fun and heritage Gaelic football repre-sents in my life,” said McGovern.

Eoghan McCarthy ’14 enjoyed similar family-related exposure to Gaelic football and other Irish sports. A big part of the game’s ap-peal for him, he said, is that Gaelic football is an amateur enterprise: “Players play for their county, for pride, for the love of the game, but never for money, which is something you don’t really see in most of the popular sports around the world.”

McCarthy also found Gaelic football to be the right mix of physical and skill dimensions for him. “It brings together some of the skills of soccer, volleyball, bas-ketball, and rugby into one very exciting, fast-paced, physical activ-ity. That’s why I think it’s such an easy sport to pick up. We’ve got football, soccer, basketball, rugby players who were able to pick it up very quickly because of the similarities between their sport and Gaelic football.”

Warm-ups concluded, the stu-dents formed up teams — one side donning neon-green sleeveless pullovers to distinguish themselves — and scrimmaged for approxi-mately an hour. The action was fast-paced and spirited, but good-natured, and there were hand-shakes, high fives and back slaps all around during and after the scrimmage.

“We’re serious about it, but we’re not super-competitive or judgmental — it’s supposed to be fun,” says Kenny.

The BC team last month played its first formal game, with another college squad in Connecti-cut (“We only lost by four points,” said Kenny, “which is pretty good, considering that they were all-male and we’re co-ed — and that they have a coach and we don’t”) and

will seek more matches during the next year.

The Irish Society also hopes to eventually add another venerable Irish sport, hurling, to its activities, although the game requires more equipment and its learning curve is somewhat more pronounced. But the immersion in Gaelic football has been a positive step forward, McCarthy says.

“All in all, I’m very pleased with how the team has grown and developed throughout the course of the year. We’ve had a lot of fun and bonded in the process, and are already looking forward to next year.”

[For more on the Irish Soci-ety, see its website at www.bc.edu/bcirish]

—Sean Smith

You’ll be hearing from them

(L-R) Keady Segel ‘15, Elise Hudson ‘12, Karen Shu ‘14, Nick Benevenia ‘14, Katie Tusch ‘13 and Greg Sacharoff ‘12 will be “The Voice” of BC’s mobile campus tour. (Photo by Lee Pellegrini)

The Irish Society’s Gaelic football team at a recent practice on Brighton Cam-pus. (Photos by Sean Smith)

Football with a different kick

Recent and upcoming additions to the Boston College Chronicle YouTube channel [www.youtube.com/bcchronicle]:

•Gaelic football at BC: The Irish Society introduces Gaelic foot-ball to the Heights [see story above].

•2012 Arts Festival: The University held its annual showcase of music, dance, theater and other arts.

Poster by BC Media Technology Services

Page 3: Boston College Chronicle

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Two Boston College graduate students, Jennifer Patey of the Connell School of Nursing and Caitlin Partyka of the Graduate School of Social Work, have been selected as 2012-13 Albert Sch-weitzer Fellows. They will spend the next year learning to effec-tively address the social factors that affect health and develop-ing leadership skills, in the spirit of the award’s namesake, famed physician-humanitarian Albert Schweitzer.

Patey and Partyka join 13 other graduate students who were named Albert Schweitzer Fellows for the Boston area. The Boston Schweitzer Fellows rep-resent seven universities, 15 aca-demic programs, and eight health and human service disciplines. In total, 243 graduate students throughout the US were named 2012-13 Schweitzer Fellows.

In addition to their regular graduate school responsibilities, Schweitzer Fellows collaborate with community-based organiza-tions to identify unmet health needs and design and implement

yearlong, mentored 200-hour ser-vice projects that improve health and well-being in underserved com-munities.

Patey, who is enrolled in the Connell School’s master’s entry psy-chiatric mental health nurse prac-titioner program, will work with EDCO Youth Alternative High School in Boston to address health knowledge deficits in underserved high school students by providing health education in a round-table

setting. Her curriculum will empha-size connecting students to com-munity resources and helping them develop daily routines that prevent chronic health conditions like dia-betes and obesity. Patey will encour-age students to actively participate in shaping their own health through discussion, goal-setting, journal writing, and one-on-one meetings.

“It is an honor to follow in the footsteps of Albert Schweitzer, an innovator in providing health

services to underprivileged popu-lations. I decided on my service project because I saw a glaring need for health education while I was employed as a math teacher at an alternative high school for under-served youth. My goal is to em-power students to improve their health, and in a greater sense, their lives,” said Patey.

Partyka, a first-year student at GSSW, is focusing on the area of childhood obesity. Working through Sociedad Latina in Rox-bury — a community organization that promotes solutions to educa-tional, social, economic, health-re-lated and other issues facing Latino youth — she has established an exercise program that offers weekly opportunities for area youths to participate in physical activity, and learn about diabetes prevention, nutrition and overall health and wellness.

Through the program, Party-ka also hopes to foster leadership among young people, bolstering their confidence and problem-solving skills in the process.

“This program goes beyond

just doing exercises,” says Par-tyka. “We’re planning activities such as hiking and kayaking, which really build teamwork and leadership. From personal expe-rience, I know how important being active is: It’s not just for your body, but for your mind and spirit.”

“Caitlin represents the profes-sionalism, drive, and creativity that social workers strive for on a continual basis. She is a complete asset to our profession and we are so proud of her fellowship,” said GSSW faculty member Sandee Tisdale.

Upon completion of their initial year, the 2012-13 Sch-weitzer Fellows will become Sch-weitzer Fellows for Life, joining a vibrant network of more than 2,500 Schweitzer alumni skilled in, and committed to, addressing the health needs of underserved people throughout their profes-sional careers.

For information on the Sch-weitzer Fellowship program, see http://www.schweitzerfellowship.org

—Kathleen Sullivan and Sean Smith

Financial Vice President and Treasurer Peter C. McKenzie has announced the promotions of for-mer Budget Director John Burke ’84 and former Associate Treasurer and Investments Director John Zona ’89.

Effective immediately, Burke will assume the role as Boston Col-lege’s new associate vice president of finance, while Zona will become chief investment officer.

In his new position, Burke will oversee the Controller’s Office, Procurement Services, Accounts Payable, Financial Management Systems, University Operating Budgets and Capital Budget, as well as long-range financial plan-ning.

“I feel privileged to have been promoted to this role,” Burke said. “I hope to support and enhance the accomplishments our division has made in the areas of more efficient business process, financial reporting

and University planning.” As chief investment officer,

Zona is responsible for the over-sight and administration of the University’s $1.9 billion endow-ment. He also will work on capi-tal and other invested funds, debt management, treasury operations, insurance and risk management.

“I am honored to assume this new position and am grateful for the opportunity to work with such an accomplished group of profes-sionals,” said Zona. “I look for-ward to playing a role in advancing the mission of Boston College.”

McKenzie said, “In John Zona and John Burke we have two very talented financial leaders, who are well respected by the senior admin-istration and the Trustee commit-tees they assist. They, and the teams they are assembling, will ensure BC finances are in good hands for many years to come.”

—Michael Maloney

University President William P. Leahy, SJ, praised Cadigan for his generosity in giving back to his alma mater. “Pat Cadigan moved out west as a young man, but never forgot his Boston roots and his affection for Boston College. We are grateful for his generous support and delighted to have our new alumni center bear his name.”

In addition to his gift to Boston College, Cadigan has also made a $12 million pledge to Boston College High School, from which he graduated in 1952. His gift rep-resents the largest donation in the school’s history and the largest ever received by a Catholic secondary school in New England. With these funds, the school will build Cadigan Hall, a new center for arts and recreation that will provide ad-ditional studio space for BC High’s fine and performing arts program and a new gymnasium for its Ar-rupe middle school division.

After graduating from Boston College in 1957, Cadigan worked as a product manager at Sylvania Electronic Systems in Waltham for five years before being recruited to the West Coast to oversee sales and marketing for EECO. He rose rapidly to become its president and CEO, running the company for nearly 20 years, and expanding it both nationally and internationally. After his retirement from EECO, he served on the boards of 15 main-

ly high tech and electronics firms, serving as chairman and CEO of several public companies, including Gateway Communications, Inc., and Linear Instruments Corp.

Cadigan also invested in real es-tate in Orange County for 40 years, a sideline that became his primary focus upon his retirement from the high tech business world. He is now the largest private real estate holder in Orange County.

In addition to his Jesuit educa-tion, Cadigan received an MBA from Boston University, a degree from Harvard University’s Ad-vanced Management Program, and a master’s degree and PhD from Claremont Graduate University, where he studied under the late business philosopher Peter Drucker.

“My parents were not able to obtain a formal education, so I felt a very personal responsibility to give back to those wonderful schools that educated and shaped me,”

said Cadigan. “Boston College is so well regarded here in California and throughout the country, thanks to the outstanding efforts of BC Chancellor Fr. J. Donald Monan and President Fr. William Leahy.

“With the Sesquicentennial Cel-ebration forthcoming, it seemed like an ideal time for me to make these commitments to my alma maters. I hope they will be helpful additions that will provide lasting benefits for these outstanding institutions, their students and alumni.”

Cadigan resides in Corona del Mar, Calif., with his wife Dr. Tan-dra Cadigan, a noted obstetrician/gynecologist. He is the father of three children: Ann; David, who played professional football for the New York Jets and Cincinnati Bengals; and Maria, who graduated from Boston College in 1991. He also has four stepchildren.

John Burke, left, and John Zona. (Photos by Christopher Huang and Lee Pellegrini)

Burke, Zona Assume New Positions in Finance Division

Continued from page 1

The atrium in the Cadigan Alumni Center. (Photo by Lee Pellegrini)

Two BC Graduate Students Earn Schweitzer Fellowships

Caitlin Partyka (left) of the Graduate School of Social Work and Jennifer Patey of the Connell School of Nursing are two of 15 Boston-area graduate students named Schweitzer Fellows for 2012-13.

Cadigan

Contact Jack Dunn at [email protected]

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Amanda Terzian, Connell School of NursingAlbany, NYAt BC: Member of Sigma Theta Tau International (nursing honor

society); Sister Thea Bowman Scholar Award winner; Undergraduate Research Fellow for Assistant Professor Kelly Stamp; peer leader of CSON Freshman Nursing Professional De-velopment Seminar; member, CSON chapter of the National Student Nurses’ Association; mentor in BC Big Sister/Little Sister program; tutor at Connors Family Learning Center; student nurse technician at US Veterans Ad-ministration Medical Center (NY); home health aide for a local elderly couple.

After BC: Accepted into the Connell School’s BS/MS program and plans to become an adult/geriatric nurse practitioner

My time at Boston College has allowed me to realize and embody the Jesuit tradition of “service to others” in a very real and personal way. As a nursing student, I have had a unique education experience, much of which occurs in the clinical setting caring for patients. I think there is a natural connection between the Jesuit spirit and nursing, and Boston College has allowed me to embrace the two as one. Similar to the Jesuit tradition, nursing takes a holistic perspective by caring for the whole person but with consideration for each part: mind, body, and spirit. At Boston College, I too have been able to mature in these aspects and come to better understand myself. I hope that by having a more complete sense of self, I can foster this same growth and healing environment for my patients. I hope to carry the spirit of service, art of reflection, and sense of interrelatedness into my future career.

Emmie A. Monsein, Carroll School of ManagementMinneapolis At BC: CSOM Honors Program; Gold-

en Key International Honor Society; Phi Al-pha Theta National History Honor Society; peer advisor in CSOM; co-organizer, Every Bite Counts food donation program; co-leader and trainer for low-income tax assis-tance program partnership between CSOM Accounting faculty and BC Neighborhood Center.

After BC: Will work as an investment banking analyst for the boutique advisory firm Moelis and Company in Boston.

BC has made such an impact. I think the academic influence is more obvi-ous, but the extracurricular pursuits and the relationships have really made their mark. I never imagined I would be able to form such close relationships with professors and administrators. Of course I’ve made such great friends, and I am also grateful for the international experiences BC has provided, both the International Management Experience course and studying abroad in Greece. I’ve learned how important it is to me to find ways to give back, be it through service trips, weekly volunteering, or in more of an administrative/facilitator role. Ultimately, BC has left me with an understanding of the importance of community and all of its components.

Irza M. Torres, Lynch School of EducationBoston At BC: Recipient of Alfred Feliciano and Valerie Lewis Award for

AHANA leadership; research project in Guatemala; mentor to students at Another Course to College High School program in Boston; advisor at Learning to Learn program; undergraduate research assistant to Professor Brinton Lykes; research on the DREAM Act submitted to the Journal of Hispanic Higher Education and to be presented at a Harvard Graduate School of Education conference.

After BC: Will work with the City Year program before attending graduate school to study social work.

My journey at BC has been a formative experience. I have learned to find my purpose and to develop an understanding on how to best serve others with my talents. As a first-generation college student, I am grateful to have received a BC education and I intend on giving back to my community — particularly by sharing my story with inner-city youth attending Boston Public Schools during my City Year service term: If I can do it, so can they. I am proud to be the first person in my family to graduate from college.

—Kathleen Sullivan, Rosanne Pellegrini and Ed Hayward

Chronicle recently caught up with some past winners of the Edward H. Finnegan, SJ, Me-morial Award, and asked them to reflect on what the honor has meant to them, then and now.

Dineen Riviezzo (1989)Degree: Political science, minor in International StudiesWhere She Is Now: Acting Su-preme Court Judge in Kings County (NY) Supreme Court, Criminal Term, presiding over felony trials

“To this day, I keep the Finnegan Award on my desk as a reminder of the faith that BC faculty and administrators had in my ability to live my life by the Jesuit ideal of ‘men and wom-en for others.’ In my work, I look for appropriate times when I can show compassion or exer-cise leniency — such as imposing treatment programs as an alterna-tive to incarceration.

“In my personal life, I have re-mained committed to giving back to Boston College for the honor they bestowed upon me. I am the president of the National Alumni Board, on which I have served for almost eight years. I am a mem-ber of the Council for Women at Boston College and I have been an admissions volunteer since the early ’90s. I will be forever grateful for my Boston College education. I hope to instill in my children the charge given to me as a Finnegan Award winner that we must ‘Find God in All Things.’”

John E. “Jack” Joyce (1961)Degree: Economics (MBA 1970)Where He Is Now: Manag-ing director and client advisor, Deutsche Bank Alex. Brown

“I had no idea I was being considered for the award, and I was blown away and so surprised when I found out I had won it. I was very grateful to my parents, who were both from Ireland, for giving me the opportunity to go to BC, and so it was a pleasure to have them sit in the front row and watch me receive the honor.

“I really felt I was blessed. So from there, I made a promise that I would always give back to BC, and since then have tried to do that in a number of ways, from serving as president of the Alumni Association to helping found the Boston College Club, which has now supported 31 scholarships to BC for inner-city students.

“I guess that winning the Finnegan Award uncovered for me that I had more potential than

as a vehicle for service to oth-ers, combined with his strong academic record, has earned him the Edward H. Finnegan, SJ, Memorial Award — Boston Col-lege’s most prestigious gradua-tion honor, given to the student who best exemplifies the spirit of BC’s motto, “Ever to Excel.”

Having explored the personal, spiritual and community dimen-sions of faith at BC, and at his Jesuit high school in Toledo, Kennedy is preparing to take the next step. This summer, he will formally enter religious life and join the Society of Jesus.

“When it comes to vocation, I think there are two kinds of people,” he says. “There are peo-ple who jump in, and people who wade in. I am the latter. It’s something I’ve been con-templating for a while, because I have been fortunate to have great models of Jesuit life in high school, and in these four years at BC. I have been able to know great men of faith, good humor and joy — and I can’t stress enough the ‘joy’ part.

“My service ex-periences made me understand myself and what I could do, and my men-tors and friends helped affirm this. I felt I could be a man for others, and so the question be-came, ‘Where do I feel God is calling me?’”

At BC, Kennedy has followed his faith in various employment, service and leadership opportuni-ties. As a sacristan for Campus Ministry, he helped set up weekly Masses and maintain BC chapels; he held the same title and respon-sibilities at St. Ignatius Church, while also assisting the parish office with daily operations, faith formation classes, prayer groups and coordinating weddings and funerals.

As a member of BC’s Ignatian Society, Kennedy led a group of students through a weekly Ex-amination of Consciousness, a form of prayer in Ignatian spiri-tuality. He provided a student perspective for the Church in the 21st Century Center advisory committee while also helping or-ganize the popular joint C21-Campus Ministry monthly event Agape Latte.

One of his most significant

experiences was through the PULSE Council, where he helped coordinate three of the service placements that are a hallmark of the PULSE Program, which combines social service fieldwork with the study of philosophy, theology and other disciplines. His duties entailed acting as a liaison between PULSE and local service agencies as well as a men-tor helping students reflect on their activities through PULSE.

His Arrupe trips to Belize as a sophomore and Mexico this past year were a means for Ken-nedy to contemplate “the idea of fostering solidarity, forming relationships with people across boundaries, whether real or self-imposed.”

PULSE Director David Mc-Menamin praised Kennedy’s ef-forts: “He sees his work with PULSE and the Arrupe program not only as service activities but as educational opportunities that

he is very grateful to have had.”

Kennedy says he has a “long list” of people who have been major influences for him: At BC, that list includes McMe-namin, Theology Professor Stephen Pope, Campus

Minister Ellen Modica and Vice President William B. Neenan, SJ. But his parents deserve a fair amount of credit, too, he adds.

“My father, as an engineer, tends to take a long view. My mother, as a pediatrician who provides a ministry of health and caring, often has to focus on more immediate needs. So I think that through their examples — not only in their occupations but their service and generosity — I am able to weigh long and short-term aspects of a situation.”

That capability, Kennedy knows, will be critical for the next phase of his life, which will begin in August when he enters the Jesuit novitiate of the Chi-cago and Detroit Province.

“I don’t find it daunting,” he says. “I have spent a lot of time in prayer and reflection. I believe that this is what God wants of my life. There are reasons to join the Society, and there are reasons to stay in the Society, and they are not always exactly the same reasons. It’s a matter of how much you trust in God.”

OTHER FINNEGAN CANDIDATES

Continued on next page

Continued from page 1

THE FINNEGAN AWARD: ‘EVER TO EXCEL’

Photos by Christopher Huang

Kennedy Ready to Continue Faith Journey in Priesthood

“I have been fortunate

to have great models

of Jesuit life in high

school, and in these

four years at BC.”

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Q&aA FEW MINUTES WITH...Jeremy Clarke, SJ

With his Australian origins and travels to China, Cambodia, Pakistan, the Philippines, South Korea and Indonesia, History Assistant Professor Jeremy Clarke, SJ, brings a decidedly Asian-Pacific perspective to his courses on China and Asia. He also serves as the faculty advisor for the Chinese Students Associa-tion and BC men’s rugby club, and as co-chaplain for the men’s basketball team. Chronicle’s Kathleen Sullivan recently caught up with the busy priest from Oz. For the complete interview, go to online Chronicle at www.bc.edu/chronicle.

Besides family and friends, what do you miss most about Australia?I miss not being able to speak freely, both in terms of accent and nuance, as I often have to modify much of what I want to say. I miss Aussie sarcasm and wit, suburban rugby games, good coffee, bodysurfing, driving on the left, schooners of Reschs and meat pies. I also notice that I’m not liv-ing in an Asian-Pacific world, and I miss that. But, for all that, life at the Heights is great and I’m very happy to be here.Your research and teaching in-terests center on China, particu-larly Chinese Christian history and East-West cultural exchange. What spurred your interest in Chi-na and what is it about China that you hope to educate students most about?I started studying Chinese language when I was 13 years old and loved it. I then lived in China for a year after high school and made lifelong friends with some Chinese classmates. I’d go to their homes, play mahjong, kick a soccer ball and eat too much food. And then I returned to Australia and watched the events of June 1989 unfold at Tiananmen. All these experiences have spurred my interest in China and keep me committed to what can be a difficult situation. I would hope to provide some tools for our students to learn about the history of China in order to be better able to interpret and understand the contemporary reality. I’d encourage them to be neither dragon slayers nor panda huggers, but somewhere in between. You’ve been a keynote speaker at a number of University events of late (Undergraduate Research Symposium, Admitted Eagle Day, Student Leadership Awards). What message do you try to get across to these undergraduates and soon-to-be undergraduates?I emphasize that the Society of Jesus (and our fabulous colleagues with whom we work alongside) has been involved in education for a very long time, ever since 1546. Thus, an incoming student is welcomed into a network and a tradi-tion that stretches back over centuries and that exists throughout the world. We’re very international in scope because we’re about serving the whole world. We can then draw on these resources and connect students to them. Simply, we want to educate students to be people of competence, conscience and compassion, with a concern for all. Last month you professed your final vows on campus at St. Mary’s Chapel, capping a journey in the Society of Jesus that began in Sydney, Australia in 1993. What have been among the greatest gifts of Jesuit life?I’ve been privileged to know some amazing Jesuits from all around the world, living in community and working for a common mission: a faith that does jus-tice. Thus, being a companion of Jesus, with brothers from around the world is one of the greatest gifts. The Society has also given me so many opportunities to help me be a better person and better priest — be that sending me to doc-toral studies in Asian and Pacific history to asking me to lead retreats for nuns in Pakistan. If I were not a Jesuit I would not have done these things. Finally, to be invited into genuine deep relationship with others through the sacraments and casual conversation is a great gift and blessing.

—Kathleen Sullivan

More at www.bc.edu/chronicle

College of Arts and Sciences senior Juliet Zawedde was one of 20 students invited to meet with entrepreneur and investor War-ren Buffett at his Berkshire Ha-thaway corporate headquarters in Omaha, Neb., last month.

Zawedde joined undergradu-ates from Harvard, Yale, MIT, Columbia, Fordham, Dartmouth and University of Virginia in a two-hour Q&A session with Buf-

fett, and later a three-hour dinner where the students were able to chat informally with Buffett.

The visit to Omaha — which also included tours of Berkshire Hathaway subsidiaries and major corporations such as Union Pa-cific and TD Ameritrade, and a dinner with prominent business executives — was organized by Smart Woman Securities (SWS), a not-for-profit organization fo-

cused on investment education for undergraduate women. The Boston College SWS chapter [www.smartwomansecurities.com/bc] was co-founded two years ago by Zawedde, who is the chapter’s chief development offi-cer, “to generate a supportive and collaborative environment that will enable more women to be-come financially self-sufficient.”

—Office of News & Public Affairs

I realized, so it has always been a special moment for me.”

Grace Simmons (2005)Degree: Political science and philosophyWhere She Is Now: Recently ac-cepted position as vice president of strategic initiatives at Chobani after working in Goldman Sachs Investment Management Divi-sion

“Winning the Finnegan Award was the second greatest honor of my life — the highest honor was being asked by my fiancé Eric Zuncic to marry him. I will never forget standing before my class with a solemn face feeling overwhelmed by the day’s events, knowing that my class was over-flowing with Finnegans. It was an incredibly meaningful experience for me. The commitment to ‘Ever

to Excel,’ which is intimately tied to the award, pushes me every day to give tirelessly to communities and organizations that want to do good and allow me to do good alongside them. I hope to never lose that focus.”

Rev. Darrell Goodwin (2003)Degree: Human development and theologyWhere He Is Now: Associate dean of students in the Division of Student Development at Se-attle University

“I think as an African-Amer-ican, first-generation college stu-dent, winning the award was the highlight of my collegiate experi-ence. In many ways, I was offered the opportunity to represent the University in a diverse and inclu-sive way and hopefully allow some-one who believed that they could not see themselves in Jesuit higher

education to know that it was pos-sible. In many respects, the award and the embodiment of what it really means to be a ‘man for oth-ers’ have also shaped my career and why I particularly desire to work exclusively in higher education.”

Linda Casale-Luz (1972)Degree: Nursing (MS 1980)Where She Is Now: Runs con-sulting firm to assist companies on employee health issues

“I always had wanted to go to BC, so winning the Finnegan Award was quite an honor to re-ceive from the school I respected so much. It feels wonderful to be recognized like that — and it’s the kind of achievement you’re glad your children know about. I guess you could say that the Finnegan Award represented a kind of mu-tual admiration between BC and me.”

Juliet Zawedde ’12 at dinner with Warren Buffett last month.

Boston College Senior Visits Famed Businessman

Rev. Darrell Goodman ’03 the year he won the Finnegan Award (above left) and as he is today.

Continued from previous page

THE FINNEGAN AWARD: ‘EVER TO EXCEL’

Lee Pellegrini

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Academic excellence. Involvement in campus life. Dedication to service. These members of the Class of 2012 exemplify what’s best about Boston College

SENIORS TO REMEMBER

ANGELA DONKORHometown: Bronx, NYMajor: Political science and international studiesNotable activities/achievements: Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship winner; Gates Millennium Scholar; Magic Johnson Foundation Scholarships; tutor at Connors Family Learning Center; volun-teer at Suffolk House of Correction; Eagle Ops Program; Student Admission Program volunteer; 48 Hours retreat program; semester at Peking University; service trips to Rwanda and Uganda; research project on immigrant workers in Kuwait Post-graduation plans: Paralegal at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison for two years, fol-lowed by law school for JD/MA in international diplomacyOverview: The distance Donkor traveled to Bos-ton College is not measured in miles alone. Born in Ghana, Donkor lived apart from her parents — who immigrated to Italy to find work — for the first eight years of her life, reuniting with them after the deaths of her twin sister and her grandmother, who had cared for Angela and her siblings. Eight years later, Donkor faced more upheaval when her family moved from Italy to the US. But determined to fulfill her dreams of college and a life of many possibilities, Donkor persevered and showed herself to be a student of outstanding academic and leadership abilities. At BC, she has continued her explorations, of the larger world and of her own potential role in it.

What were your most formative experiences at BC?There have been so many, but I would point to three. When I was a freshman work-

ing for The Heights, I was assigned to do an interview with the US Ambassador to Egypt Francis J. Ricciardone Jr., who was speaking at BC. I didn’t know who he was — I had been given the story because the editor knew I was interested in Islam — so when he was introduced you can imagine how anxious I was. What was I supposed to ask him?

But the interview went well. So I felt that this was a school where I could do any-thing, where I could have access to an important person like this, who took me seriously and was very helpful.

There also was my first class with [Adjunct Associate Professor] Kathleen Bailey, Introduction to Political Science. I was so nervous; I was the first in my family to set foot in a college classroom, and I wasn’t sure what to expect. Then Kathy explained the writings and other aspects of the class, and I took joy in this. I felt I could succeed.

Working as a tour guide in the Student Admission Program — seeing the large numbers of students who had a desire to come here and be part of who we are — also was very important for me. Talking to them allowed me to see BC through their eyes, and kept me from taking this place for granted. I knew it was a great responsibility to be speaking for the school, and that I was an image of BC these students might take with them.

How do you think being at BC has changed you?Four years ago, I came here with a simple dream: to be the first in my family to

graduate from college. Now, I’m leaving with a new language acquisition — Chinese — and am going to be working at a law firm that has a great reputation for its pro bono work — Paul, Weiss was the only firm that would help Thurgood Marshall prepare for Brown vs. Board of Education.

I thought I could make a difference but didn’t know how. BC has showed me the way. Whatever I lacked, this school has provided the resources, whether through an of-fice, a program or a person. I will always be grateful for that. BC told me I could dream more, and that they would support me.

Who have been your biggest influences at BC?There have been people like Kathy Bailey, [O’Neill Library Instructional Services

Manager] Kwasi Sarkodie-Mensah and [Vice President for Student Affairs] Patrick Rombalski, who have been so reassuring and supportive. I also have to thank University Counseling Services for helping me through some difficult times.

I have been able to achieve many things and have had many wonderful experiences at BC, but nothing — and nobody — is perfect. Anyone can have problems. I have experienced failure, there have been people who let me down, or things that have forced me to look inside myself.

But there are, and always have been, people to help me, and I have never let failures or difficulties define who I am.

What will you miss about BC?I’ll miss the football games. BC was my first real exposure to football, and I didn’t

know what to make of it at first. But it’s not really the sport itself, it’s that we all rally behind something: When we are all together, wearing our “Superfan” shirts, we are all Eagles, cheering for BC.

I’ll miss the Arts Festival, because it is so exciting to see and hear all the talented people on this campus.

I will miss being part of a community that has my back. It has always been a source of comfort to be in a place where, if I go around the world and come back, I can tell people what I’ve been doing, and know that they’ll care.

—Sean Smith

TOMMY CROSSHometown: Simsbury, Conn.Major: Communication; International Studies minorNotable activities/achievements: Captain of BC’s 2012 NCAA National Champion Men’s Ice Hockey team; Eagle of the Year Award as outstanding senior male student-athlete; co-recipient of the 2012 John “Snooks” Kelley Memorial Award, as the individual who best typifies Boston Col-lege hockey; Boston College Junior Male Outstanding Scholar Athlete in 2011; vice president of university relations for the BC Student Athlete Advisory Council; volunteer with Community Connections at Newton North High School Post-graduation plans: Signed contract last month with the Boston Bruins; played final week of the season for the Providence Bruins of the AHL before returning to classesOverview: Cross graduates from Boston College with an impressive collection of hardware: two NCAA Men’s Ice Hockey National Championships, Hockey East regular season and tournament championships and three Beanpot trophies. But the senior defenseman, known as a smart, physical force on the ice, earned praise for his measured leadership as the Eagles’ captain this year, particularly for refocusing the team following a mid-season sweep at the hands of Maine. The Eagles went on a 20-win streak on their way to claiming the program’s fifth national title on April 7 against Ferris State University.

Who has had the most profound influence on you during your time at BC? Clearly, Coach [Jerry] York has been a big influence. But when I first came to campus he introduced me to Fr. Tony Penna in Campus Ministry and told me he would have a huge impact on my life. And he was right. I have lunch with Fr. Penna once a week and we talk. He’s helped me when things had me rattled. He helped me, especially as a leader, the last two years. He wouldn’t tell me what to do, but he encouraged me and he was always there for me. The way he treats people makes him a role model for the entire team.

Which professor had the biggest impact on you?Visiting Assistant Professor of Communication Celeste Wells. I originally

took her writing course because it fit my schedule. But I found her to be the most inspiring teacher I’ve had. She brought great energy to class and treated each student with such respect. She helped to guide us along through the course. She’s a teacher who stands out above the rest.

Outside of your success on the ice, what experience has made the biggest difference for you at BC?

My experience as a volunteer with a program called Community Connec-tions at Newton North High School. It’s a program for students with disabilities and I go there at least every other week and spend time with the kids. They’re so excited to meet BC athletes and talk to us. We send each other e-mails and I brought the Beanpot Trophy and we drank soda out of it. It makes my day to go there. So much has been given to us as athletes and students and we’re so fortunate to be at BC. It’s important for us to give back.

What will you miss the most about BC?My roommates Edwin Shea, Barry Almeida, Paul Carey, Chris Venti and

Tommy Atkinson. We’ve gone through our four years together – at the rink and off. They’re my best friends. It’s hard to think about all of us not being together all the time. We leave here with a lot of great memories.

If you weren’t going to play professional hockey, what would you be doing?

I’d like to be involved as a coach or an administrator in college athletics, maybe one day working as an athletics director. It would be great to do that at BC. I think it would be rewarding to work with athletes and to work on the administrative side of college athletics.

—Ed Hayward

Photos by Lee Pellegrini

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MICHAEL CAPRIOHometown: Providence, RIMajor: Economics and commu-nication; Hispanic Studies minorNotable activities/achievements: Editor-in-Chief, The Heights; member, Swing Kids Dance Team; Omicron Delta Epsilon Econom-ics Honors SocietyPost-graduation plans: Real es-tate capital analyst for KeyBankOverview: A quiet yet respected student leader, Caprio won the admiration of students, faculty and administrators for his devo-tion to chronicling the triumphs and tribulations of Boston College during his four years with The Heights. Elected editor-in-chief of this award-winning independent student paper, Caprio devoted 50 hours per week to his position while excelling as an economics major. Upon graduation, he will utilize his leadership skills as a real estate capital analyst for KeyBank.

How have your activities in-fluenced your four years at Bos-ton College?

More than anything, being an editor on The Heights for three years augmented every part of my experience here at Boston College. The constant contact with the people and issues that shape the

ASHLEY THIBODEAUHometown: Grosse Pointe, Mich. Major: NursingNotable activities/achievements: CSON Honors Program; Under-graduate Research Fellow; Boren Scholarship recipient; study abroad at the University of Cape Town, South Africa; participant, CSON-Haiti community health clinical; volunteer, Children’s Hospital, Boston; four-year member and 2011-12 president of Women’s Club Lacrosse team; volunteer, American Red Cross-Boston Col-lege blood drives; volunteer, Met-roLacrosse, a skills and enrichment program for Boston area youth; founding member of Every Bite Counts food donation program; presenter at Undergraduate Re-search Symposium Post-graduation plans: Work as a pediatric nurse for a few years and then pursue graduate studies in nursing Overview: Thibodeau has always sought out opportunities to en-hance her learning and nursing skills. She volunteered at Chil-dren’s Hospital of Michigan and Children’s Hospital in Boston, of-ten spending time with young pa-tients in the hospital playroom or bringing toys and games to them when they were too sick to leave their rooms. While studying in South Africa, she volunteered with University of Cape Town medical students on mobile clinics bringing health care to residents of nearby

townships. She traveled to Haiti where she and other BC nursing students cared for about 1,000 patients in clinics in rural villages. Thibodeau chose to explore the importance of this international service experience on nursing stu-dents through her honors thesis, “Experiences of Undergraduate Nursing Students in Haiti Com-munity Health Clinical.”

Who have been some of your most influential professors?

The support I’ve received from [Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of Clinical Learning and Simulation Centers] Amy Smith has been really great. She worked with the seniors on their place-ments and she has offered great feedback for me on the journal I’ve kept during my placement. [Assistant Professors] Melissa Sutherland and Natalie McClain

are both inspirational. I learned a lot about research methods and interviewing people from watch-ing Natalie.

What kind of a difference has BC made for you?

The international opportuni-ties I had were crucial to me and are not something many other nursing programs offer. I came back from South Africa and Haiti with new excitement for nurs-ing. I know I and a lot of the nursing students returned from Haiti feeling like we had really come into our own as nurses be-cause we got to work so inde-pendently. It is really great to get out of your comfort zone and have faculty like Donna Cullinan who want to take kids to places that they are so passionate about. What has been one of your most memorable experiences during your time at BC?

My years on the Women’s Club Lacrosse team have been among my best memories, es-pecially going twice to Arizona to represent BC in the national tournament.

What will you miss most?I will miss the connections

with the Connell School faculty. The program is small enough that you get to know the entire faculty. There’s never a time I go there and I don’t know someone. It’s nice thinking how we’re all in nursing for the same reason — to be there for the patient.

—Kathleen Sullivan

JESUS DAMIAN BAEZAHometown: Tucson, Ariz. Major: English and human development Notable activities/achievements: Winner, Archbishop Oscar A. Romero Scholarship, St. Alphonsus Rodriguez Student Leadership Award; orientation leader; captain of the Fuego del Corazon dance troupe; co-director of Latino student recruitment efforts for the Organization of Latin American Affairs; McNair Scholar; helped raise $20,000 for Missis-sippi Delta Region while on the AHANA Leadership Council Volunteer Corps immersion trip; studied in Madrid, where he co-orga-nized activities for Moroc-can children at the local YMCA Post-graduation plans: Attend the Donovan Urban Teach-ing Scholars Program at Boston College in preparation to work in urban area high schoolsOverview: Baeza, the first in his family to go to college, has made the most of his Boston College experience, whether pursuing leadership opportunities or broadening his view of the world through service trips and studying abroad. He also has found time to enjoy the arts, as captain of BC’s popular Latino dance group Fuego del Corazon. Now he is poised to share the lessons he has learned — inside and outside the classroom — beyond Chestnut Hill.

What did you take away from your work with the ALC Volunteer Corps?

The ALC Volunteer Corps experience was my first face-to-face encounter with the reality of the struggle many urban schools face in the US. As part of our educational experience, a group of us went down to the Mississippi Delta Region to address our nation’s achievement gap in a very personal way by providing reading assess-ments to elementary students and talking to high school students about college. This was one of the experiences that made me realize I wanted to teach students instead of counseling students. I believe that, as a teacher able to work with students everyday in an academic setting, I can have more of direct effect on their lives.

What has been your best experience at BC?Being a member of Fuego del Corazon, BC’s only Latin dance

team. It was my home away from home, a family of people that I will always hold dear to my heart. Aside from learning the techni-calities of Latin dancing and the logistics of running an organized dance team, I also learned how to be a leader. Additionally, it was a new experience for me that really pushed out of my comfort zone; I never thought I would be performing Latin ballroom dance in college.

Who are the people — teachers, administrators, mentors — who made a difference in your life over the last four years?

I have been fortunate enough to have a number of great people guide me through my last four years. These people are the ones I went to when I needed help and the first ones to know about any good news. They also made sure to push me when I needed it and times when they felt I could challenge myself more. These people consisted of my professor in the English Department, faculty directors from First Year Experience, and even the counselor who accepted me at BC. The important thing to know is that there are potential mentors around you as a student all the time, whether at your job or in your classrooms —even your peers will make a dif-ference in your life. The challenge sometimes lies in an individual’s willingness to allow people in their lives.

What advice would you give to an incoming freshman looking to get the most out of his/her years at BC?

The secret to getting the most out your four years at Boston Col-lege is simply getting involved. I encourage every student to invest his/her time and energy into an organization or club that he/she is interested in. This is especially important for first-year students because it allows you to meet other students who share common interests with you. These organizations help you build your own community at BC. The earlier you get involved the earlier you can find a community to thrive in.

—Melissa Beecher

University’s student life and aca-demics showed me how dedicated people at this school are to the development of the students. This gave everything I did – from danc-ing with Swing Kids to studying for exams – much more meaning.

Which faculty members had the greatest effect on your per-sonal development?

[Adjunct Associate Professor] Richard McGowan, SJ, of the Economics Department was one of the faculty members who made me passionate about economics. He teaches his students analysis and logical thinking in a way that they can apply it to bettering soci-ety and themselves.

My more recent art and lit-erature classes with [Associate Pro-fessor] Ernesto Livon-Grosman in the Romance Languages Depart-ment truly taught me how to be a life-long student. His emphasis on conversation and intellectual curi-osity showed me how to transcend traditional classroom learning and provided a great capstone for a liberal arts education.

How has Boston College made a difference in your life?

Looking back on the last four years, what I appreciate most is Boston College’s dedication to providing its students with a liberal education in the arts and sciences. I am now more interested in fields like ecology and modern art – sub-jects I had no interest in when I was a senior in high school. This is a gift that BC has given me.

What will you miss most about BC?

I will miss the faculty most. As a student, I like knowing that I have these passionate thinkers living and working beside me and that, most importantly, these people care about my education and develop-ment. I think this is something all students take for granted, but it is something that you can’t find any-where outside of a university. That is what I will miss.

—Jack Dunn

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By melissa BeecHer staff writer

Timothy Padulsky never had the chance to walk across the stage at Commencement and collect his degree, but a new Student Leadership Award named in his honor will ensure the extraordi-nary young man’s legacy lives on at Boston College.

His was just one of many sto-ries celebrated April 30, at the Student Programs Office’s annual Student Leadership Awards, which recognize outstanding members of the BC community. In addition to the award named for Padul-sky, which honors an outstand-ing sophomore, two other prizes debuted this year: the Junior Year Award, given to a student who fostered community spirit at BC during his or her third year, and the Registered Student Organiza-tion Award, for a student group that enriched the lives of under-graduates.

Padulsky — who had been a member of the Class of 2010 —lost his battle with leukemia in 2008, but is still remembered fondly by students and adminis-trators at BC, the only college to which he applied. Those closest to him recall Padulsky as hav-ing a rare mix of special qualities, including intellect – he was vale-dictorian of Woburn High School — and leadership, which he dem-onstrated by founding a collegiate arm of Rotary Club International and as one of 50 students selected for BC’s Emerging Leader Pro-gram. He also was remembered for his sense of humor: While quar-antined during his cancer treat-ment, he held a coloring contest to decorate the drab green walls of the hospital.

“Tim is unforgettable,” said As-

sistant Director of Student Pro-grams Mer Ursula Zovko, who met Padulsky during his freshman year. “And while many students pass through Boston College, this award will ensure that we never forget about Tim. He will be cel-ebrated each and every year to come.”

This year, Padulsky’s younger brother Stephen will graduate from BC. His youngest brother, Michael, is a member of the class of 2015, while his sister, Kristen ’08, CSON MS ’10, works in pe-diatric neurology division at Tufts Medical Center’s Floating Hos-pital for Children – the hospital where Tim was treated.

The tight-knit Padulsky fam-ily attended the Student Lead-ership Award ceremony, where sophomore Allison McQueen was given the first-ever Timothy M. Padulsky Award. McQueen has been a member of 4Boston since her freshman year and has volun-teered at the Kennedy Day School, a program on Warren Street for children with severe special needs. McQueen said that becoming a member of the 4Boston Council made “BC a home” for her.

“4Boston is an embodiment of BC and its Jesuit ideals. I feel so lucky that I have gotten to know such an amazing group of people

and better understand BC through this experience,” said McQueen.

Also honored at the awards were: Adjunct Professor of Ro-mance Languages Jeff Flagg, who was given the Reverend John R. Trzaska, SJ, Award for the fac-ulty member who expanded the horizons, skills, and value sys-tems of Boston College students by providing support and guid-ance outside of the classroom; and University Mission and Ministry Program Administrator Marina Pastrana, who received the Mary Kaye Waldron Award for her in-volvement with the Montserrat Coalition, a program that aims to serve students at the highest level of need at BC.

Other winners honored this year include Jonathan Lacoste ’15, Christopher Faherty ’13, Hanyin Cheng ’12, Yini Guan ’14, Dana Bogan ’12, Emily Charnowski ’12, Jesus Damian Baeza ’12, MacLean Cadman ’12, Irza Torres ’12, Claire Geruson ’13 and Conor Sullivan ’13 [for a full description of each award, see http://bit.ly/JIIV6d].

Video profiles of each of the win-ners can be found via the online Chronicle at www.bc.edu/chronicle.

of Management professors assist with the academy program.

The inaugural group of acad-emy fellows recently completed the program and a second cohort of fellows was welcomed at a din-ner on campus.

“Thaly’s prior experiences as a teacher, school principal and as executive director of aligned staff at New Leaders give her unique insight into building programs that support school principals and will be assets in her role as director of the Lynch Leadership Academy,” Kenny said.

Germain said her range of ex-periences in education has made her a firm believer in the power of educational leaders to develop effective schools, empower teach-ers and inspire students.

“I firmly believe that the most important factor for ensur-ing student achievement is in strengthening the school leader,” said Germain, who has taught at public and charter schools and served as principal of the Maya Angelou Public Charter School in Washington, DC. “I am hon-ored to lend my vision, passion, innovation and expertise in ur-ban education and leadership to head this exciting new initiative.”

At New Leaders, Germain served as national director for charter school strategy and led a charter initiative, funded by NewSchools Venture Fund. Since 2009, she designed and implemented a national profes-sional development program for staff at New Leaders.

Germain holds a Master of Teaching degree from Fordham University and a Master of Edu-cation from Trinity University. She has served as an adjunct pro-fessor at Boricua College in New York City.

Germain, who emigrated from Haiti and grew up in New York City, said her family, the schools she attended and the principals who led them played crucial roles in her success as a student and growth as a person.

“It’s really important for to-day’s students to understand that the path isn’t always easy,” said Germain. “I think everyone needs someone in their life who understands, who cares, who be-lieves and motivates them to do the work – and that is the work of the leader and of every staff member at a school.”

Contact Ed Hayward at [email protected]

Contact Ed Hayward at [email protected]

In Memory of an ‘Unforgettable’ StudentNew leadership award is named for the late Timothy Padulsky

Sophomore Allison McQueen (center), inaugural winner of the Timothy Padulsky Award, with members of the Padulsky family (L-R) Michael ’15, Stephen ’12, Mary and Kristin ’08, CSON MS ’10, at the April 30 Student Leadership Awards.

Contact Melissa Beecher at [email protected]

“I firmly believe that the most important factor for ensuring student achieve-ment is in strengthening the school leader,” says Thaly Germain, newly ap-pointed director of the Lynch Leadership Academy.

Continued from page 1

New Leader for Academy

a process borrowed from the thin-film semiconductor indus-try helped produce a more than 50 percent increase in electrical conductivity.

The process, known as a 3D modulation-doping strat-egy, succeeded in creating a solid-state device that achieved a simultaneous reduction in the thermal conductivity, which combined with conductivity gains to provide a high figure of merit value of ~1.3 at 900 degrees Celsius.

“To improve a material’s fig-ure of merit is extremely chal-

lenging because all the internal parameters are closely related to each other,” said Yu. “Once you change one factor, the others may most likely change, leading to no net improve-ment. As a result, a more popular trend in this field of study is to look into new oppor-tunities, or new material systems. Our study proved that opportu-nities are still there for the exist-

ing materials, if one could work smartly enough to find some alternative material designs.”

Ren pointed out that the per-formance gains the team re-ported compete with the state-of-the-art n-type SiGe alloy materials, with a crucial differ-ence that the team’s design

requires the use of 30 percent less Germanium, which poses

a challenge to energy research because of its high cost. Lower-ing costs is crucial to new clean energy technologies, he noted.

“Using 30 percent less Ger-manium is a significant advan-tage to cut down the fabrication costs,” said Ren. “We want all the materials we are studying in the group to help remove cost barriers. This is one of our goals for everyday research.”

The collaboration between Ren and MIT’s Chen has pro-duced several breakthroughs in thermoelectric science, par-ticularly in controlling phonon

Continued from page 1transport in bulk thermoelectric composite materials. The team’s research is funded by the Sol-id State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Center.

The 3STEC Center is part of the US Department of En-ergy’s Energy Frontier Research Center program, which is aimed at advancing fundamental sci-ence and developing materials to harness heat from the sun and convert the heat into electric-ity via solid-state thermoelectric and thermophotovoltaic tech-nologies.

“We want all the materials

we are studying in the group

to help remove cost barriers.

This is one of our goals for

everyday research.”

—Zhifeng Ren

Physics Researchers See Progress in Their Work on Semiconductors

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By sean smitH cHronicle eDitor

Throughout the course of Boston College’s religious and spiritual life, it is often the Lit-urgy Arts Group that provides the soundtrack.

Under the direction of Cam-pus Minister Meyer Chambers, LAG — comprised primarily of undergraduates — provides mu-sic at Sunday liturgies and other special events on campus, such as the Mass of the Holy Spirit, the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults Mass, the annual “send-off Mass” for the Appalachian Volunteers program and, most recently, the BC Arts Festival.

LAG’s roster of both seasoned and less experienced singers and musicians offers a repertoire of classic hymns and spirituals, as well as more contemporary works — some by BC-affiliated composers like Associate Campus Minister JoJo David, an occa-sional LAG accompanist. A LAG performance might feature the Shaker hymn “Simple Gifts,” “They Who Do Justice” by emi-nent liturgical composer David Haas, and a South African spiri-tual, “Siyahamba,” that includes lyrics in Zulu.

But LAG is about more than singing songs: Its members be-lieve in the tradition of music-making as an expression of faith, and share it not only with one another and with the University community, but with congrega-tions and communities outside Boston College — among other

places, they have sung at local schools, the Italian Home for Children and the MCI-Framing-ham women’s prison.

“It is a service, first of all — a service to the University,” says Chambers, “and in particular to their peers in the student body.”

And like most any student organization, LAG members say, the group is a means for building relationships through common interests and goals.

“LAG combines BC ideals about service for others, as well as making friends and having a safe place to talk to each other about our daily lives, and about God,” says senior Mark Zappi. “For me, it’s been a life-changing experience.”

The group was started in the late 1980s by Musician-in-Residence and Music Ministries Director Laetitia Blain as an out-growth of the University Cho-rale, then under the direction of Alexander Peloquin, according to Chambers. When Blain retired in 2000, her former student Kate Leavey ’91, MA ’93 served as LAG director, and was succeeded in 2003 by Chambers.

“It’s a wonderful legacy to work in,” says Chambers. “I’m truly honored to follow in the wake of such great people.”

On one unseasonably warm late-winter afternoon, LAG gath-ered for its weekly rehearsal in St. Joseph’s Chapel on Upper Cam-pus. Students settled into chairs, exercised their voices, arranged sheet music, chatted about their spring break activities — and

other subjects college students are wont to discuss — and joked with the ever-amiable Chambers.

Finally, it was time for an im-portant LAG ritual, one that does not involve singing scales or other vocal warm-ups: The members, along with Chambers, gathered into a circle, held hands and in-vited one another to pray.

“We pray for each other, we pray for the strength of the group — anything that anyone sees fit, whatever is going on in our lives,” explains Michael Sabounjian, who as a non-Catholic finds it meaning-ful “to be able to pray with stu-dents of different faith traditions, in a safe environment. I think it’s quite powerful.”

The faith-and-fellowship com-ponent is equally important for Sarah Otterson ’13, as is the op-portunity to continue her involve-ment in church music, which dates back to third grade. Being part of

LAG, she says, also allows her to relish sublime moments, such as during the Christmas Mass at St. Ignatius Church.

“Everyone is given candles, and at one point the lights are dimmed and the candles all are lit,” she says. “To see that wave of light spreading all the way back into the congregation is just a wonderful spiritual experience, one I would never have been able to appreciate if I wasn’t in LAG.”

The enthusiasm for, and dedi-cation to, liturgical music shown by students like Otterson, Cham-bers says, represents a valuable future resource for the Catholic Church, one that LAG seeks to encourage.

“We want [the students] to go into parishes and be active par-ticipants — not only in the choir but in helping support the music ministry of the parish, and its other ministries as well. Hopefully, some

people might go into professed as well as ordained ministries. It’s part of our baptismal call to help in the Church’s furthering.”

The prayer concluded, the students settled back into their chairs and searched through the sheet music until they found the first piece to be practiced. Silence hung in the chapel for a few seconds, Chambers holding his right hand steady and looking into the students’ eyes, and then, with gentle piano chords, LAG brought forth its collective voice as the late afternoon sun began to decline.

The Liturgy Arts Group website is http://www.bc.edu/offices/minis-try/liturgy/lag.html.

See a video about LAG on the Chronicle YouTube channel [www.youtube.com/bcchronicle]

By reiD oslin staff writer

A $1 million grant from the William E. Simon Foundation of New York City will be the cornerstone of an enhanced Oral Advocacy Program at Boston College Law School.

The gift will support an on-going program to help participat-ing students sharpen their public speaking skills and develop the ability to argue legal matters pas-sionately and persuasively. The program will be named the Si-mon Oral Advocacy Program in honor of the late William E. Simon Sr., former US Treasury Secretary and Chairman of the US Olympic Committee who established the educational and benevolent foundation.

“Oral advocacy is a vital part of a Boston College Law School education,” said BC Law Dean Vincent D. Rougeau. “The Si-mon Foundation’s generous gift will anchor our program for fu-ture generations of law students, providing them with invaluable hands-on experience as they pre-pare to begin their careers. We’re grateful to the Foundation for their vision and support.”

“The Oral Advocacy Program has been a hallmark of Boston College Law School for many decades,” said Bill Simon Jr. JD ’82, co-chair of the William E. Simon Foundation. “Literally thousands of top-flight litigators first learned their skills in the various competitions at the Law School. I am proud to have par-ticipated in the Grimes Com-

petition and as a member of the National Moot Court Team. The lessons I learned from Peter Donovan and many others re-main with me to this day over 30 years later.

“My parents recognized the importance of being able to argue passionately and persuasively, and thought very highly of the Oral Advocacy Program,” Simon said. “So it is entirely fitting that the family foundation they es-tablished should make this gift in their name, thus ensuring that future generations of students will continue to have the same great opportunities to hone their public speaking skills.”

A team from BC Law first won the National Moot Court Competition in 1968. In 1974, BC Law student Joan Lukey won

best oralist in the National Com-petition. In 2008, Lukey became the first woman to be elected president of the American Col-lege of Trial Lawyers.

In the past decade, the Law School has added an Intellectual Property Moot Court Team in response to the growing com-plexity of this field of law and a corresponding interest in re-lated career paths. A European Union Moot Court team has also been formed in recognition of the increasing globalization of legal studies. Participation in this team provides BC Law students with an opportunity to compete not only against other schools across the United States, but also in Europe before judges from European boards and courts.

Last year, student representa-

tives won the National Immi-gration Moot Court Competi-tion and the Religious Freedom Moot Court Competition, where a BC Law student was named best oralist. A team of first-year Boston College Law students also advanced to the semifinal round of the ABA Negotiation Compe-tition; BC was the only school to send first-year participants to this event.

In addition to the gift from the Simon Foundation, the Uni-versity will initiate an advance-ment campaign to fully and per-manently endow the Simon Oral Advocacy Program at BC Law School.

Voices of FaithThe Liturgy Arts Group brings an important musical dimension to University’s spiritual life

The Liturgy Arts Group “is a service, first of all — a service to the University,” says its director Meyer Chambers, “and in particular to their peers in the student body.”

Photo by Christopher Huang

Contact Sean Smith at [email protected]

Contact Reid Oslin at [email protected]

Simon Foundation Gift Boosts Law School’s Oral Advocacy Program

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By sean smitH cHronicle eDitor

It’s one of Boston College’s oldest, most storied traditions — almost as old as Commencement — and it’s still going strong.

This past weekend featured the 120th Fulton Prize Debate, the annual showcase for the Ful-ton Debating Society, which comprises some of BC’s best un-dergraduate orators.

The event, which has taken place almost every year since 1890, also draws many Fulton alumni, some of whom serve as judges for the debate. This spring, given the debate’s 120-year milestone and the Univer-sity’s forthcoming Sesquicen-tennial Celebration, Director of Debate John Katsulas decided to make the occasion special by inviting a greater number of alumni than usual — 36 — to adjudicate.

Fulton Society members de-bated the question of whether the US Supreme Court should strike down the Stolen Valor Act of 2005, which made it a federal misdemeanor to falsely represent oneself as having received a US military decoration or honor. The affirmative side was declared the winner by a 24-12 decision, with Brendan Benedict ’12 earn-ing the Fulton Medal as best debater; senior Nora Lopopolo, who argued on the negative side, earned the Gargan Medal as run-ner-up.

Benedict will now have his name added to the long list of Fulton Medal winners that adorns Gasson 305, better known as “the Fulton Debate Room,” where the debate takes place. Other win-ners have included Henry Foley (1921), founder of the distin-guished Boston law firm Foley Hoag & Eliot; James M. Curley Jr. (1928), son of Boston’s color-ful, controversial mayor; John J. Wright (1931), later a bishop and cardinal; and John J. Curtin Jr. (1954), a future American Bar Association president.

Boston College’s debate team goes back to the early months of the school, when it was formed as the “Senior Debating Society” and overseen by Robert Fulton, SJ, a future BC president. The society began as a formal activity in 1868 and was named the Ful-ton Debating Society in 1890.

“If you look at that wall in the Fulton Room, you see a mi-crocosm of how BC has grown

and changed,” says Katsulas, who has been director of debate since 1994 after serving for eight years as debate coach. “From the names, you can see early on the evidence of BC’s Irish roots. As the years go by, you begin to see a more diverse BC taking shape. But one thing is constant: The Fulton Society has had a lot of the best and brightest at BC.”

In addition to holding cam-pus debates three times a semes-ter, the Fulton Debating Society fields a squad for competitive de-bates with teams from other col-leges, which typically take place on weekends and can involve considerable travel — their itin-erary this academic year has tak-en them to Harrisonburg, WV, West Point, NY, Winston-Salem, NC, and Dallas, among other

locations. BC is widely acknowl-edged for its debating prowess, and with good reason: Fulton’s resume includes three number one finishes in the national de-bate rankings over a four-year period in the early 1990s.

The days leading up to this past weekend’s prize debate had Fulton Society members past and present alike reflecting on the challenges and rewards of debat-ing, and of the rich tradition it enjoys at BC.

“Debate offers a great op-portunity to hone analytical and rhetorical skills outside of the classroom,” said senior Ryan Fo-lio, an Allentown, Pa., native. “The Fulton Society adds an ele-ment of community that will be around for a lifetime.”

“As a litigator, the skills

learned in competitive debate are invaluable,” said 1999 Fulton Medal winner Jared Fields ’01, now an attorney in Salt Lake City. “The subject matter is dif-ferent, but my ability to research issues, to think critically, and to structure an argument are all skills I developed as a member of Fulton. Several times in my ca-reer, when I have been addressing a judge in the courtroom, I have realized that in my mind I was going through the same process as when I was in a college debate round.”

Having had no debate expe-rience prior to BC, Benedict, from Clarksburg, NJ, recalls his impression of debate as “people wearing tuxedos in front of large auditoriums being persuasive.” While Fulton does have some of that (perhaps not the tuxedos, at least not anymore), Benedict describes his time in the society as intellectually stimulating and personally rewarding, and relish-es being part of a distinguished tradition.

“The first thing I saw on the Fulton website was a photo of the wall in the Fulton Room, and I

thought, ‘Man, that is cool,’” he said. “To know that you are part of a legacy that goes back to the 19th century is very gratifying.”

San Jose, Calif., native Lopo-polo — who regards debate as “an adrenaline rush” that, while stressful, is “worth it, especially if you win” — loves the history and lore of the society. The annual prize debate is “a great opportu-nity to hear not only what Fulton was like, but how it fit into the University’s campus life.”

While many Fulton alums pursue legal careers, where their debating experience is often help-ful, Dilip Paliath ’93 — who won the Fulton Medal as a se-nior — points out that debate and rhetoric have applications in everyday life.

“Whether with your fam-ily, friends or co-workers, people have their opinions and express them,” said Paliath, an attorney in Baltimore. “When they have to defend their opinions, they use the principles of debate and rhetoric to do so. Some people do that better than others. Some just express the opinion and cannot say why they have it. Others can give their reasoning and defend their positions. The latter are the ones who are better debaters.”

Paliath, along with more than a few Fulton alumni, finds it difficult to be just a spectator at the annual Fulton Debate: Lis-tening to arguments and coun-ter-arguments, they say, unfail-ingly awakens an old debater’s instincts.

“I cannot stop myself when I listen to any speech from try-ing to learn new techniques or tricks,” says 1975 Fulton Medal winner Michael Reilly ’76, a trial lawyer for more than three de-cades, “and trying to imagine how I could do it better.”

The Fulton Debating So-ciety website is at http://tinyurl.com/7r59x3j

Director of Debate John Katsulas with Fulton Debating Society members (L-R) Sullivan McCormick ’15 and se-niors Nora Lopopolo, Brendan Benedict and Ryan Folio. (Photo by Sean Smith)

Days of yore: Fulton Debating Society teams from 1913 (above), 1954 (right) and 1978.

A Debate That Just Goes On, and On, and OnFulton Prize Debate (now 120 years old) a showcase for BC orators

Contact Sean Smith at [email protected]

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NOTA BENE

JOBS

BC BRIEFING

The following are among the most recent positions posted by the De-partment of Human Resources. For more information on employ-ment opportunities at Boston Col-lege, see www.bc.edu/offices/hr/:

Assistant Director, Pre-Award Administration, Office of Spon-sored Programs

Director of Development, Col-lege & Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Assistant or Associate Director, Alumni Participation & Market-ing, Annual Giving

Project Lead/ETL Developer, In-formation Technology - Applica-tions Services

Senior/Programmer Analyst (Software Developer), Student & Academic App. Srvs.

Teacher Assistant, Lynch School of Education - Campus School

Assistant Program Director, Lynch School of Education - Campus School

Research Associate, Center of Re-tirement Research

Research Pscyhometrician, TIMSS (Trends in Mathemat-ics & Science Study)

Research Specialist, Reading, TIMSS (Trends in Mathemat-ics & Science Study)

NewsmakersAssoc. Prof. Jonathan Laurence (Political Science) offered his views to the French newspaper Libéra-tion on the impact of the French presidential election on US-France relations.

Though Abraham Lincoln is usu-ally highlighted by historians for winning the Civil War and freeing the slaves, he “was absolutely the most transformational president in American history,” said Prof. Heather Cox Richardson (His-tory) in an interview with Investor’s Business Daily.

Seelig Professor of Philosophy Richard Kearney discussed with Canadian national public radio the polarization that tends to charac-terize public discussion of religion and the need for a conversation in which doubt and faith “criss-cross.”

The extent to which Sarah Palin had liabilities as a candidate and as a public official has had some implications as to what we think of all women in office, said Moakley Professor of Political Science Kay

Schlozman in an interview with the Boston Herald.

Prof. Laura Tanner (English) dis-cussed virtual reality in 9/11 fiction in a podcast interview for Brandeis University’s Literature Lab.

Publ icat ions

Assoc. Prof. Andrea Vicini, SJ (STM), published “Ethical Chal-lenges of Human Genetics Today: From the Lab, through the Clinic, to the Pews” in Studia Moralia.

Prof. Laura Tanner (English) pub-lished “Holding On to 9/11: The Shifting Grounds of Materiality” in PMLA.

Honors /Appointments“Man In The Red Bandanna,” an ESPN “Outside the Lines” tribute to 1999 alumnus and 9/11 hero Welles Remy Crowther produced by classmate Andrew Gallagher and narrated by actor Ed Burns, won a Sports Emmy in the “long

feature” category at the 33rd an-nual awards presentation by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Lect. Edward Taylor (CSOM) received the 2012 Massachusetts Society of CPAs Outstanding Edu-cator Award.

GrantsProf. Jeffrey Cohen (CSOM): $5,000, PricewaterhouseCoopers Foundation, for “Do disclosures

of profes-sional and social ties between the CEO and

the audit committee affect inves-tors’ judgments of the effectiveness of the audit committee?” Lect. Timothy Gray (CSOM), $5,000, PricewaterhouseCoopers Foundation, to develop cases for the Business Writing course.

Time and a Half Prof. Margaret Kenney (Math-ematics) presented “Reflections on Teaching Mathematics” at the Mathematics and Sciences Awards Ceremony at Wheelock College, and “Dissections and Decomposi-tions” at the 90th Annual Meeting of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics in Philadelphia.

A funeral Mass was celebrat-ed last Saturday in Lake Forest, Ill., for sophomore Michael Gan-non, who died on April 28. Vice President for University Mission and Ministry Jack Butler, SJ, and Director of Campus Ministry Fr. Tony Penna, were concelebrants at the Mass, which was attended by many friends and classmates from Boston College.

Mr. Gannon, 20, was a student in the Carroll School of Manage-ment and a member of the BC water polo team.

In a letter to the Boston College community, Vice President for Student Affairs Patrick Rombalski said the news of Mr. Gannon’s

death “has saddened our commu-nity,” and encouraged members to reach out to staff in Counsel-ing Services, Residential Life and Campus Ministry. “As a commu-nity we depend upon one another, and can all benefit from our shared strength, comfort, and care.”

Rombalski noted that Mr. Gannon will be remembered in all campus liturgies for the remain-der of the semester, and was also among those memorialized at this past Monday’s annual Service of Remembrance for all members of the University community who have passed away during the aca-demic year.

—Office of News & Public Affairs

The Boston Globe tapped Carroll School of Manage-ment and Economics Adjunct Associate Professor Richard McGowan, SJ, author of several books on the gaming industry, to participate in an April 26 forum on the debate over the legalization of casinos in Massachusetts.

The discussion, “MassVegas,” centered on the potential number, types and locations of casinos in the state. Event organizers said the decision-making process could be-come contentious and significantly change the character of many Massachusetts communities.

Fr. McGowan was invited to present his viewpoints on how the decisions around the issue will affect the Common-wealth. Other panelists included John F. Ribeiro, founding member of “Neighbors of Suffolk Downs”; Michael Davis, 2013 president-elect of the Boston Society of Architects; and Steve Tocco, a representative of Wynn resorts. Boston Globe deputy editorial page editor Dante Ramos served as moderator.

An audience of more than 200, among them civic and business leaders, attended the forum, held at the Seaport World Trade Center.

—Rosanne Pellegrini

Andrew Krivak, a part-time faculty member in the Col-lege of Arts and Sciences Honors Program, is the inaugural winner of the new Chautauqua Prize, which celebrates a book of fiction or literary/narrative nonfiction that provides a richly rewarding reading experience and honors the au-thor for a significant contribution to the literary arts.

Krivak’s first novel The Sojourn — which chronicles the story of a young man who leaves his 19th-century Colo-rado mining town to lead an impoverished life in Austria-Hungary and is eventually embroiled in World War I — was among five finalists for the prize. The award includes $7,500 and all travel and expenses for a one-week sum-mer residency at Chautauqua Institution, a not-for-profit educational and cultural center in southwestern New York State. He will host a public reading and book signing at Chautauqua on Aug. 6.

“I feel honored to be part of this new tradition at Chau-tauqua Institution, and to be recognized by a place with such a long-standing commitment to art and literature in America,” Krivak said.

—Office of News & Public Affairs

Lynch School of Education Hon. David S. Nelson Profes-sor Anderson J. Franklin was among a group of artists, educators and community leaders honored Monday night at New York City’s Lincoln Center for exploring innovative measures to improve communities and the lives of young people.

The event, “Big Builders for Young People,” at the David L. Koch Theater was held by the New York-based All Stars Project, which offers a range of after-school, educational and performing arts opportunities to youths in the city. Franklin and the other honorees were lauded as “ground-breakers and builders who are creating new possibilities for our world.”

—Ed Hayward

obItuArySophomore Michael Gannon, 20

Rev. James Skehan, SJ, founder of the University’s Geology and Geophysics (now Earth and Environmental Sciences) Department and former Weston Observatory director, and sculptor Janie Belive view a bust she made of Fr. Skehan. The bust was unveiled at an April 25 celebration in Devlin Hall to honor Fr. Skehan, who turned 89 that day. (Photo by Caitlin Cunningham)

A Debate That Just Goes On, and On, and On

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The 14th annual Boston College Arts Festival, which took place April 26-28, enjoyed generally pleasant weather and a typically strong turn-out from the University and area communities. In addition to performers by students, faculty, staff and alumni, the festival featured the presentation of the Arts Council Awards, including the Alumni Award for Distinguished Achievement to theater director Tony Taccone ’72.

The whole Arts Festival was a grand success. It was a success not only because of those three days that the thou-sands of people see the final product, but because of the hard work of months of planning, rehearsals, training, mentoring, advertising, and dedication by all the artists, student employees, faculty, staff, and volunteers that bring it to fruition.

I think the moments that stand out most for me are the moments the audience never sees. I remember how active the Arts Council Office became during spring se-mester with our student employees feverishly preparing supplies, advertising, programs, and dealing with all the details of creating such a large event. It was like a giant beehive with nonstop activity.

I also remember on the Friday of the festival [April 27] how the student volunteers had to stand behind the backdrop for the awards ceremony because it was windy and it would have fallen down. So the volunteers stood silently behind the BC Ban-ner, unseen, to hold it in place for the hour we were on stage.

The final moment was on Saturday night, when we packed up and were all sitting in the tent exhausted and exhilarated because what we had done was such a success. We were already starting to talk about next year and looked forward to doing it all again.

—Associate Professor of Theatre Crystal Tiala, chair of the BC Arts Council

This year was my first as the Arts Festival director, and I have to say that what I was most impressed by was the huge range of talent our student artists encompass. The students’ dedication to the arts overwhelmed me, from the performers to the volunteers to the staff. I couldn’t have been happier with the passion that was exuded over the course of the festival.

One moment that stood out to me was Friday evening of the festival, around 10:30 p.m. At this point, my staff had already been working tirelessly over the course of the week to prepare, set up and run the festival. After already working 13 hours or so on Friday, they had to set up for one last event, the After Hours Theatre beginning at 11 p.m. I was so impressed with the energy they still had at that point in the festival; not only did I not hear any complaints from them, but they were happy to be there. We had some music on the speakers during set-up and they were singing along as they organized backstage, cleaned up the tent and tested sound and lighting for the stage. Their enthusi-asm kept me going the entire week of the festival.

—Sarah McDermott ’07, Arts Festival Director

LOOKING AHEAD

A Mother’s Day concert featuring arias, duets and art songs from the Italian, Russian, German, Jewish and Slavic traditions will be presented in Gasson 100 on May 13. This “Musical Bouquet for Mother’s Day,” presented by the Slavic and Eastern Languages and Literatures Department, begins at 3 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

Performers include soprano Normma Giustiani, mezzo-so-prano Olga Bykhovsky, violist Michael Zaretsky, tenor Matthew Shifrin and pianist William Merrill. The program features works by Ludwig van Beethoven, Johannes Brahms, Gioacchino Rossini, Antonin Dvorak, Irving Berlin and others.

“We always look forward to the beauty and rich diversity which these occasional concerts have brought to our community, to the blend of sacred and secular, and all the different musical tradi-tions,” said Slavic and Eastern Languages and Literatures Depart-ment Chair and Professor Michael J. Connolly.

Performer and music educator Giustiani founded the Roman Music Festival in 1997, and has performed extensively throughout Germany, Italy and the US. She has taught distinguished soloists and children’s choirs, including the award-winning Roman Chil-dren’s Choir.

Bykhovsky studied opera at the New England Conservatory and has performed numerous recitals around Boston and through-out New England.

Long-time Boston Symphony Orchestra member Zaretsky performs in the US and abroad. He has an extensive repertoire, his numerous recordings have received favorable reviews, and he regularly plays solo recitals and appears with leading artists.

Merrill, one of Boston’s most highly respected collaborative pianist/coaches, is a celebrated local personality. He has worked with eminent singers, is critically acclaimed and has extensive professional affiliations and recordings.

The Mother’s Day concert is co-sponsored by the Roman Mu-sic Festival. For information, contact Connolly at [email protected] or see fmwww.bc.edu/FEMG/120513BC.pdf

—Rosanne Pellegrini

Marking its 10-year anniversary, Instructional Design & eTeaching Services will hold its annual E-Teaching Day on May 16, featuring morning and afternoon lectures and workshops, a keynote speaker and a ceremony honoring the six winners of this year’s Teaching With New Media (TWIN) Awards, which recognize faculty who successfully inte-grate a range of web-based tools into their classroom teaching.

This year’s TWIN winners are: Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biol-ogy Joseph Burdo, for classes in neuroscience and physiology; Lynch School of Education Assistant Professor Elida Laski, for her course on child growth development; Professor of English Paul Lewis, for his advanced topic seminar on Boston’s literary history; Lynch School of Education Associate Professor Laura O’Dwyer, for her course on multi-level regression models; and Law School Assistant Professor Brian Quinn, for his class on corporations.

Eric Mazur, Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics and Area Dean of Applied Physics at Harvard, will deliver a keynote address in Devlin Hall. In addition to his work in optical physics, Mazur is interested in education, science policy, outreach, and the public percep-tion of science.

Morning and afternoon workshops and lectures will showcase inno-vative uses of technology in teaching by BC faculty. For more informa-tion or to register for programs and events, see http://bit.ly/HWVDPu.

—Ed Hayward

Normma Giustiani and Michael Zaretsky will be among the per-formers at this Sunday’s Mother’s Day concert in Gasson 100.

‘Musical Bouquet’ for Moms

E-Teaching Day Is May 16

A Feast of a Festival

MASTI was one of the student groups featured at the Arts Festival Dance Showcase, above. At right, members of the BC Chamber Society tuned up on O’Neill Plaza. (Photos by Sean Smith)

Arts Council Alumni Award winner Tony Taccone ’72 spoke with students following his appearance.

The Boston College Symphony Orchestra per-formed on the second day of the festival.

A “Bollywood”-style production of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” took place in Rob-sham Theater as part of the Arts Festival.

Photos by Lee Pellegrini