of 111 /111
SIDA’S GLOBAL RESEARCH PROGRAMMES ANNUAL REPORTING INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE PROGRAMME (ISP) ANNUAL REPORT 2013

ISP AR 2013 final 1401002 pict

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

           

 

 

SIDA’S  GLOBAL  RESEARCH  PROGRAMMES  

ANNUAL  REPORTING  

 

INTERNATIONAL  SCIENCE  PROGRAMME  (ISP)  

ANNUAL  REPORT  2013    

 

 

   

 2  

       

   Left  picture:  Arsenic  contaminated  groundwater  in  Northern  Burkina  Faso,  the  level  of  pollution  reaches  1650  ppb  in  the  village  of  Tanlili.  December  16th  2013.  Right  picture:  Laterite  soils  ores  in  the  village  of  Laye  located  at  35  km  from  Ouagadougou,  Burkina  Faso.  December  18th  2013.  (Courtesy  of  IPICS  BUF:02,  Department  of  Chemistry,  University  of  Ouagadougou,  Burkina  Faso)      

 The  group  of  students  who  took  the  LANBIO  Course  on  Insect-­‐Plant  Interactions,  10-­‐12  November  2013  Cochabamba,  Bolivia.  (Courtesy  of  IPICS  LANBIO,  Dept.  Chemistry,  University  of  Chile,  Santiago,  Chile).    

 3  

CONTENTS    

Section  1:  EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY  ....................................................................................................  1  

Section  2:  ORGANISATION  .................................................................................................................  6  

Section  3:  OBJECTIVES;  OPERATION  AND  RELEVANCE  ............................................................  7  

3.1   ISP’s  objectives  ..............................................................................................................................................  7  3.2   ISP’s  method  of  operation  .........................................................................................................................  8  3.3   Relevance  for  development  cooperation  of  ISP  support  .............................................................  8  3.4     ISP’s  alignment  with  Swedish  policies  and  strategies  .................................................................  8  3.4.1   Alignment  with  the  goals  and  strategies  of  Uppsala  University  ......................................  8  

3.4.2   Alignment  with  the  Swedish  government’s  policies  and  strategies  ..............................  9  

3.5   ISP’s  alignment  with  international  policies  and  strategies  ......................................................  10   Section  4:  STRUCTURE  ......................................................................................................................  11  

4.1   The  ISP  Board  ...............................................................................................................................................  11  4.2   The  ISP  Executive  Committee  ...............................................................................................................  11  4.3   The  ISP  Scientific  Reference  Groups  ..................................................................................................  12  4.4   ISP  Staff  ...........................................................................................................................................................  12  

Section  5:  PROGRAM-­‐WIDE  RESULTS  ..........................................................................................  13  

5.1   Activities  .........................................................................................................................................................  13  5.1.1   Research  Groups  .................................................................................................................................  13  

5.1.2   Scientific  Networks  ...........................................................................................................................  16  

5.1.3   Sida  Assignments  ...............................................................................................................................  18  

5.1.4   Other  Activities  ...................................................................................................................................  19  

5.2   Achieved  Outcomes  and  Outputs  .........................................................................................................  23  5.2.1     Expenditures  by  Supported  Activities  .....................................................................................  24  

5.2.2     Students  and  Staff  .............................................................................................................................  28  

5.2.3   Dissemination  ......................................................................................................................................  29  

5.3     Outputs  and  Outcomes  that  were  not  achieved  ...........................................................................  30  5.3.1   Annual  Report  2012  ..........................................................................................................................  30  

5.3.2   Proposal  to  Sida  ..................................................................................................................................  30  

5.3.4   Difficulties  in  finding  PhD-­‐candidates  in  mathematics  in  Cambodia  ..........................  30  

   

 4  

5.4     Publications  ..................................................................................................................................................  31  5.4.1   Chemistry  ..............................................................................................................................................  31  

5.4.2   Mathematics  .........................................................................................................................................  39  

5.4.3   Physics  ....................................................................................................................................................  46  

5.5     Academic  theses  .........................................................................................................................................  52  5.5.1     PhD  Theses  ..........................................................................................................................................  52  

5.5.2     Other  Postgraduate  Theses  ..........................................................................................................  54  

Section  6:  EXAMPLES  OF  APPLICATIONS  AND  IMPACT  ..........................................................  59  

6.1     Examples  of  research  findings  .............................................................................................................  59  6.2     Examples  of  influence  on  policy  or  practices  ................................................................................  60  6.3     Examples  on  strengths  and  benefits  to  researchers  and  stakeholders  ..............................  62  6.3.1     Technical  development  ..................................................................................................................  63  

6.3.2     Awards,  honors  and  promotions  ................................................................................................  63  

6.3.3     Post  doc  and  research  visits  .........................................................................................................  65  

6.4     Communication  and  use  of  research  results  ..................................................................................  69  6.4.1     Communication  of  research  results  at  scientific  conferences  and  meetings  ..........  69  

6.4.2     Arranged  conferences,  workshops,  training  courses,  and  other  meetings  ..............  90  

6.4.3     Other  communications  and  outreach  activities  ...................................................................  95  

6.4.4   Use  of  results  ........................................................................................................................................  97  

6.4.5   Other  interesting  results  and  activities  ....................................................................................  99  

Section  7:  ABREVIATIONS  AND  ACRONYMS  ............................................................................  100  

APPENDIX  1:  Logical  framework  of  the  International  Science  Programme  ................  105  

 

 

Cover  picture:  Undergraduate  students  J.  Magero  and  Caroline  Chepkurui,  with  the  Geothermal  Development  company  staff,  on  field  study  tour  of  Mt.  Suswa,  a  volcano  under  geophysical  survey,  for  their  final  year  project  work.  (Courtesy  of  IPPS  KEN:03,  Department  of  Physics,  Univeristy  of  Nairobi,  Nairobi,  Kenya)

 1  

SECTION  1:  EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY    

International  Science  Programme  Annual  Report  2013  

The  Annual  Report  since  2010  essentially  follows  “Sida’s  Global  Research  Programmes  Annual  Reporting:  Guiding  Principles  and  Reporting  Format”,  provided  in  June  2010.      Objective,  Relevance,  Structure  and  Organization  (Sections  2  –  4)    The  objective  of  the  International  Science  Programme  (ISP)  is  to  contribute  to  the  development  of  active  and  sustainable  environments  for  higher  education  and  scientific  research  in  developing  countries,  within  chemistry,  mathematics,  and  physics,  in  order  to  increase  the  domestic  production  and  use  of  results  relevant  for  the  fight  against  poverty.      The  support  is  collaborative  and  long-­‐term,  with  a  strong  local  ownership.  Support  is  provided  to  institutionally  based  research  groups,  and  to  scientific  networks.  It  includes  cooperation  with  research  groups  at  more  advanced  host  institutions  at  Swedish  universities,  in  other  Nordic  and  European  countries,  and  in  the  regions.  ISP  also  administers  some  bilateral  research  programs,  supported  by  Sida.    ISP  is  at  the  Faculty  of  Science  and  Technology  at  Uppsala  University  and  has  three  subprograms:  • International  Programme  in  the  Physical  Sciences  (IPPS,  since  1961)  • International  Programme  in  the  Chemical  Sciences  (IPICS,  since  1970)  • International  Programme  in  the  Mathematical  Sciences  (IPMS,  since  2002)    A  Board  and  an  Executive  Committee  to  the  Board  is  governing  ISP.  Each  subprogram  has  a  Scientific  Reference  Group  to  guide  activities.  The  Board  and  the  reference  groups  have  participants  representing  institutions  outside  Uppsala  University  and  Sweden.  The  operation  of  ISP  is  regulated  in  an  ordinance  established  by  the  Swedish  government  in  1988.  In  2013,  ISP  had  six  scientific  and  seven  administrative  staff  members,  including  a  part-­‐time  scientific  coordinator.      A  capacity  for  research  and  higher  education  in  basic  sciences  is  important,  and  may  promote  several  key  factors  for  development.  To  achieve  its  general  objective,  ISP  defines  three  specific  objectives,  to  be  achieved  on  the  level  of  the  supported  collaboration  partners:    1) Better  planning  of,  and  improved  conditions  for  carrying  out,  scientific  research  and  postgraduate  training.  

2) Increased  production  of  high  quality  research  results.  3) Increased  use  by  society  of  research  results  and  of  graduates  in  development.  

The  operation  of  ISP  agrees  well  with  the  overarching  goals  and  strategies  of  Uppsala  University  (UU),  and  with  applicable  Swedish  government  policies  and  strategies,  including  The  Policy  for  Global  Development,  The  New  Development  Policy  2007,  The  New  Africa  Strategy  2007,  The  Strategy  for  Sida’s  support  for  development  research  cooperation  2009,  and  the  communication  on  Higher  education  in  development  cooperation.  It  also  harmonizes  with  the  Millenium  Development  Goals,  the  proposed  Sustainable  Development  Goals,  and  the  activity  of  NEPAD.          

 2  

Activities  and  Results  (Sections  5  –  6)    Expenditures  and  number  of  ISP  supported  activities  2013,  students  registered,  and  outcome  in  terms  of  student  graduations  and  dissemination  (L.Am.  =  Latin  America)     Africa   Asia   L.Am.   Total  Expenditures  by  research  groups  and  networks  (kSEK)*  -­‐  Shorter  term  training,  visits  and  travels  -­‐  Development  of  technical  resources;  local  events.  -­‐  Regional  activities  and  training  -­‐  Longer-­‐term,  mostly  “Sandwich”  type  training  Total  expenditures    

 1,809  6,595  3,487  4,886  

16,778  

 

614  1,572  513  913  

3,612  

 0  0  

300  3,507  3,807  

 

2,424  8,167  4,300  9,307  

24,197  

Number  of  Supported  Activities  Research  Groups  in  Swedish  Focus  Countries  Research  Groups  in  Non-­‐Focus  Countries  Regional  Scientific  Networks  Total  number  of  activities  

 22  4  14  40  

 7  2  3  12  

 0  0  2  2  

 29  6  19  54  

Students    Students  registered  for  PhD  (sandwich  type)  Students  registered  for  PhD  (local)  Percentage  of  PhD  students  that  are  female      Students  registered  for  MSc  or  MPhil  (sandwich  type)  Students  registered  for  MSc  or  MPhil  (local)  Percentage  of  MSc  students  that  are  female      Total  number  of  postgraduate  students  Percentage  of  postgraduate  students  that  are  female      PhD  graduations  (“sandwich”/local)  Lic.,  MSc  and  MPhil  graduations  (“sandwich”/local)  

 119  135  18    9  

264  26    

527  22    

15/15  1/62  

 10  30  28    8  68  20    

116  22    

0/    4  0/12  

 12  0  33    4  1  60    

17  41    

1/0  1/0  

 141  165  20    

21  333  25    

660  23    

16/19  2/74  

Dissemination    Publications  in  International  J.  (with  TR  impact  factors)**  Publications  in  International  Journals  (“TR  unlisted”)**  Books,  Chapters,  Popular  Publ.,  Technical  Reports,  etc.      International  Conference  Contributions  Regional  Conference  Contributions  National  Conference  Contributions    Total  dissemination    Conferences/Workshops/Courses  arranged    Number  of  participants  

 66  114  18    

85  103  26    

412    

44  ≈2,000  

 11  20  3    

29  10  30    

103    

19  ≈1,700  

 6  0  0    4  6  9    

25    4  

≈300  

 83  134  21    

118  119  65    

540    

67  ≈4,000  

*Only  Sida-­‐funded  expenditures  are  listed.  Explanation  to  expenditure  categories  is  given  in  Section  5.2.1.  **See  Section  5.4.    Supported  scientific  research  groups  and  networks    In  2013,  totally  35  research  groups  were  supported:  16  in  chemistry,  2  in  mathematics,  and  17  in  physics.  Out  of  these,  6  were  new  and  received  their  first  year  of  support  in  2013.  In  8  of  the  12  Swedish  focus  countries,  Bangladesh,  Burkina  Faso,  Cambodia,  Ethiopia,  Kenya,  Mali,  Uganda,  and  Zambia,  29  groups  were  supported,  and  6  groups  in  two  other  contries,  4  in  Zimbabwe  using  Sida  funding,  and  2  in  Laos  using  funding  from  Stockholm  University.      Totally  19  scientific  networks  were  supported,  12  in  chemistry  (8  in  Africa,  3  in  Asia  and  1  in  Lat.  Am.),  2  in  mathematics  (both  in  Africa),  and  5  in  physics  (4  in  Africa  and  1  in  Lat.  Am.).  

 3  

Sida  assignments    ISP  had  Sida  coordination  assignments  in  the  bilateral  programs  with  universities  in  Mozambique,  Tanzania,  and  Uganda.  In  addition,  ISP  was  engaged  to  pay  subsistence  allowances  to  bilateral  students  from  Bolivia,  Rwanda,  Tanzania,  and  Uganda  while  in  Sweden.      Other  activities    In  the  collaboration  with  Al  Baha  University  (ABU),  Saudi  Arabia,  a  female  ABU  staff  member  was  admitted  as  PhD  student  to  the  Dept.  Mathematics  at  Uppsala  Univerisity.  In  addition,  a  four-­‐year  project  aiming  at  developing  the  computer  science  education  at  ABU  was  initiated.    In  collaboration  with  Linköping  University,  ISP  entered  into  partnership  with  University  of  Rwanda,  in  the  subprogramme  on  Research  Management,  in  the  new  phase  of  the  Sida  bilateral  cooperation  program  starting  in  July  2013.    Within  the  collaboration  with  the  National  Mathematical  Centre  (NMC),  Abuja,  Nigeria,  one  NMC  staff  member  continued  PhD  training  at  Luleå  University  of  Technology  (LTU),  Luleå,  Sweden.    In  collaboration  with  the  Royal  Swedish  Academy  of  Sciences,  the  Swedish  Secretariat  for  Environmental  Earth  System  Science,  and  the  European  Academies  of  Science  Advisory  Council,  ISP  participated  in  the  planning  of  workshops  on  the  theme  “Energy  at  the  Village  Level”.    In  collaboration  with  the  Faculty  of  Science  at  Stockholm  University,  ISP  supported  in  particular  the  development  of  the  Pan  African  Centre  for  Mathematics,  and  research  groups  in  Laos    The  efforts  to  formalize  a  new  agreement  with  Thailand  Research  Fund  were  in  2013  expanded  to  embrace  the  Thailand  International  Development  Cooperation  Agency  (TICA)  and  the  Development  Cooperation  Section  of  the  Swedish  Embassy  in  Bangkok.  A  meeting  was  held  in  Bangkok  in  April,  where  the  conditions  for  the  agreement  were  settled,  and  a  high-­‐level  TICA  delegation  visited  Sida  and  Uppsala  University  in  September.    In  2013,  ISP  hosted  three  fellow  evenings,  gathering  students  in  the  Stockholm-­‐Uppsala  region.    ISP  staff  gave  talks  at  seven  international  conferences  and  three  meetings  in  Sweden,  and  participated  in  another  five  meetings  relevant  to  activities.  The  annual  review  meeting  with  Sida  was  held  1  October,  and  4  October  a  meeting  was  held  at  Sida  with  Prof.  John  Mathiasson,  Syracuse  University,  USA,  to  refine  ISP’s  Results  Based  Management  system.  Within  the  frame  of  introducing  Results  Based  Management,  ISP  began  informing  supported  partners,  initially  to  the  applicants  attending  the  chemistry  reference  group  meeting.    ISP  offered  stipends  to  11  Swedish  students  in  the  Sida-­‐financed  Minor  Field  Study  program,  and  additionally  supported  two  co-­‐applicants  through  funding  to  the  research  groups  hosting  the  students.      In  2013,  a  chapter  “40  Years  of  Support  to  Chemistry  in  Africa”  was  published  in  the  Springer  volume  “Chemistry  for  Sustainable  Development  in  Africa”,  ISP  exerted  guest  editorship  for  a  special  issue  of  a  Wiley  journal  on  Physical  Geology,  and  ISP’s  Strategic  Plan  2013-­‐2017  was  published.    During  the  year,  ISP  received  visitors  from  University  of  Rwanda,  Mbarara  University  of  Science  and  Technoloy,  Uganda,  University  of  Nairobi,  Kenya,  and  from  the  American  University  in  Cairo,  Egypt.        

 4  

Achieved  Outcomes  and  Outputs    In  2013,  the  54  research  groups  and  scientific  networks  supported  by  ISP  using  Sida  funding  spent  about  24  million  SEK.  Research  groups  accounted  for  51%  of  the  total  expenditures,  and  scientific  networks  for  49%.  The  research  group  expenditures  in  Swedish  focus  countries  not  having  a  Sida  bilateral  agreement  on  research  development  cooperation  were  53%,  in  focus  countries  also  having  a  Sida  bilateral  agreement  on  research  development  cooperation  34%,  and  in  non-­‐focus  countries  13%.    In  total,  there  were  306  PhD  students,  46%  of  them  being  trained  on  “sandwich”  basis.  In  2013,  35  PhD  students  graduated.  In  all,  there  were  20%  female  PhD  students.  There  were  354  students  pursuing  other  postgraduate  degrees  (MSc,  MPhil,  Licentiate),  only  6%  of  these  on  a  “sandwich”  basis.  In  2013,  76  such  students  graduated.  In  all,  there  were  25%  female  students  of  those  pursuing  other  than  PhD  postgraduate  degrees.      The  proportions  of  female  staff  engaged  in  research  groups  and  scientific  networks  were  on  average  16%  in  African  and  23%  in  Asian  activities.  In  all  5%  of  group  leaders  and  network  coordinators  of  African  activities  were  female,  and  23%  of  those  in  the  Asian  region.    In  2013,  38%  of  217  publications  in  scientific  journals  were  in  journals  listed  with  Thomson  Reuter  impact  factors.  There  were  21  other  publications,  such  as  book  chapters,  technical  reports,  and  popular  publications.  In  addition,  302  contributions  were  made  to  scientific  conferences,  39%  at  the  international,  39%  at  the  regional,  and  22%  at  the  national  level.  Also,  67  scientific  meetings  were  arranged.    

Outcomes  and  Outputs  that  were  not  achieved    The  publication  of  the  ISP  Annual  Report  2012  was  delayed,  and  so  was  Sida’s  assessment  of  ISP’s  proposal.  ISP  suffered  delays  due  to  the  time  needed  to  put  the  Strategic  Plan  2013-­‐2017  in  place,  and  due  to  time  spent  on  more  rigorous  quality  control  of  the  annual  report  data.  Unavoidable  circumstances  at  Sida  forced  the  proposal  assessment  to  be  postponed  to  the  later  half  of  the  year.  Additional,  external  factors  then  introduced  more  delays,  that  prevented  the  final  decision  from  being  taken  before  the  end  of  the  year.    There  were  difficulties  in  finding  suitable  PhD  candidates  in  mathematics  in  Cambodia.  A  regional  network  in  mathematics  in  South  East  Asia  is  proposed,  which  might  strengthen  this  discipline  in  the  institution  in  Cambodia  expected  to  participate.    Examples  and  applications;  research  findings  and  policy  influence    Research  findings  were  reported  in  the  fields  of  Clay  properties  (Burkina  Faso),  Drug  development  (Kenya,  Zimbabwe),  Electrochemical  sensors  (Zambia),  Environmental  chemistry  (Bangladesh),  and  Water  chemistry  (Burkina  Faso).    Several  opportunities  for  policy  influence,  on  a  variety  of  fields,  were  reported  in  Bangladesh,  Botswana,  Burkina  Faso,  Eritrea,  Ethiopia,  Kenya,  and  in  the  Southern  African  region.    In  Burkina  Faso,  the  removal  of  arsenic  from  contaminated  water,  using  granular  ferric  hydroxide,  was  investigated.  Furthermore,  the  network  “PDE,  Modeling  and  Control”  participated  in  outreach  activities  with  policy  makers  in  Burkina  Faso  on  the  vulnerability  of  African  cities  to  climate  change.    In  Ethiopia,  the  good  links  of  researchers  on  seismology  with  the  Ministry  of  Public  Works  have  resulted  in  that  it  is  now  mandatory  to  get  seismic  assessment  for  large  construction  projects.  

 5  

The  seismology  group  is  collaborating  also  with  the  Ministry  of  Urban  Development  and  Construction  to  update  the  building  code  and  standard  of  the  country.      In  Kenya,  partners  were  invited  to  stakeholder  meetings  to  discuss  policies  for  solar  water  heat-­‐ing  of  new,  large  office  buildings,  to  minimise  the  grid  electricity  load.  Activity  impacts  were  de-­‐livered  to  government  and  society  through  partners’  membership  of  Kenya  Nuclear  Electricity  Board  and  Kenya  Radiation  Protection  Board.  Partners  were  involved  in  updating  the  Kenya  National  Implementation  plan  for  the  Stockholm  Convention  concerning  the  Africa  Region.  Membership  of  the  National  Council  for  Science  and  Technology  permitted  influence  on  the  policy  on  Nanoscience  and  Nanotechnology  in  the  country.    In  Zimbabwe,  studies  of  drugs  for  HIV  treatment  have  resulted  in  improved  dosing  guidelines.    Examples  of  strengthening  and  benefiting  partners  and  stakeholders    Improvement  of  technical  resources  and  methods  were  reported  in  Bangladesh,  Burkina  Faso,  Cambodia,  and  Kenya.    Awards  and  promotions  benefited  partners  in  Bangladesh,  Burkina  Faso,  Cambodia,  Kenya,  Senegal,  Tanzania,  and  Zimbabwe.    Post  doc  and  research  visits  were  carried  out  in  Bangladesh,  Burkina  Faso,  Finland,  France,  Germany,  Italy,  Japan,  Kenya,  the  Netherlands,  South  Africa,  Spain,  Sweden,  Tanzania,  Tunisia,  USA,  Zambia,  and  Zimbabwe.    Research  results  were  disseminated  at  scientific  meetings  in  Africa,  Asia,  Europe,  and  North  and  South  America.    Results  were  used  in  fields  such  as  Applied  physics,  Construction  engineering,  Health  care,  Human  resources  development,  Instrument  repair,  Insurance  business,  Laboratory  services,  Medical  technology,  Mining,  Outreach  to  society,  Plant  products  development,  Rural  illumination,  and  Solar  energy  applications.    In  Bangladesh,  the  organization  NITUB  repaired  102  non-­‐functioning  pieces  of  scientific  equipment  of  different  institutions,  to  a  value  of  about  595,000  USD,  but  at  a  cost  of  roughly  1,100  USD.    In  Burkina  Faso,  Professor  Yvonne  Bonzi  was  honored  with  the  African  Union  Price  of  Science,  Technology  and  Innovation.    In  Cambodia,  one  of  the  chemistry  student’s  theses  was  honored  with  the  HONDA  YES  award.      In  Zambia,  the  group  at  Dept.  Physics,  Univ.  Zambia,  has  been  involved  in  installations  of  solar  home  systems  in  rural  areas.    In  Zimbabwe,  the  Ministry  of  Health  and  Child  Care  and  the  Ministry  of  Home  Affairs  were  able  to  address  a  severe  fatal  traffic  accident,  by  identifying  victims  through  DNA  profiling  services  provided  by  AIBST.    

   

 6  

SECTION  2:  ORGANISATION    

International  Science  Programme  

Uppsala  University  

P.  O.  Box  549  

SE-­‐751  21  UPPSALA  

SWEDEN  

 

Visiting  address:  Ångström  Laboratory,  Lägerhyddsvägen  1  (Polacksbacken),  Uppsala  

Phone:  +46  18  471  3575  |  Fax:  +46  18  471  3495  

Email:  [email protected]  

Internet:  www.isp.uu.se    

 

Sida  Agreement:  Contribution  ID  54100006  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A  laboratory  session  at  the  49th  NITUB  training  program.  (Courtesy  of  IPICS  NITUB,  Dhaka,  Bangladesh).  

 7  

SECTION  3:  OBJECTIVES,  OPERATION  AND  RELEVANCE  

     3.1   ISP’s  objectives  

To  contribute  to  the  development  of  active  and  sustainable  environments  for  higher  education  and  scientific  research  in  developing  countries,  within  chemistry,  mathematics,  and  physics,  with  the  ultimate  goal  to  increase  the  production  and  use  of  results  relevant  for  the  fight  against  poverty  by  researchers  in  the  basic  sciences  in  developing  countries.    According  to  ISP’s  Strategic  Plan  2013-­‐2017:1  

ISP  contributes  to  the  creation  of  new  knowledge  to  address  development  challenges.  

The  ISP  vision  is  to  efficiently  contribute  to  a  significant  growth  of  scientific  knowledge  in  low-­‐income  countries,  thereby  promoting  social  and  economic  wealth  in  those  countries,  and,  by  developing  human  resources,  in  the  world  as  a  whole.    

In  support  of  this  vision,  the  overall  goal  of  ISP  is  to  contribute  to  the  strengthening  of  scientific  research  and  postgraduate  education  within  the  basic  sciences,  and  to  promote  its  use  to  address  development  challenges.    

ISP  therefore  has  the  general  objective  to  strengthen  the  domestic  capacity  for  scientific  research  and  postgraduate  education,  by  long-­‐term  support  to  research  groups  and  scientific  networks  in  these  fields.  

The  expected  outcome  for  supported  partners  in  low-­‐income  countries  is  scientifically  stronger,  more  resourceful  research  environments,  better  qualified  postgraduates,  and  the  increased  production  and  use  of  high  quality  scientific  research  results,  

The  expected  outcome  for  collaborating  hosts  to  ISP-­‐supported  partners  is  an  expanded  global  perspective,  an  enhanced  awareness  and  knowledge  of  the  potentials,  conditions,  and  relevant  issues  of  research  collaboration  with  low-­‐income  countries,  and  an  increased  collaboration  with  scientists  in  those  countries.  

To  achieve  its  general  objective,  ISP  defines  three  specific  objectives,  to  be  achieved  on  the  level  of  the  supported  collaboration  partners:    

1) Better  planning  of,  and  improved  conditions  for  carrying  out,  scientific  research  and  postgraduate  training.  

2) Increased  production  of  high  quality  research  results.  3) Increased  use  by  society  of  research  results  and  of  graduates  in  development.  

These  objectives  constitute  the  basis  for  ISP’s  logical  framework  in  the  results  based  management  (RBM)  system  introduced  in  2013.  The  program  logic  published  in  ISP’s  Strategy  Plan  2013-­‐2017  was  refined  in  November  2013  (Appendix  1).  The  corresponding  monitoring  and  evaluation  system  is  being  developed.          

                                                                                                                         1  http://www.isp.uu.se/digitalAssets/188/188888_1isp-strategic-plan-2013-2017.pdf  

 8  

3.2   ISP’s  method  of  operation  

ISP  provides  support  for  the  development  of  active  and  sustainable  research  and  higher  education  in  the  basic  sciences  physics,  chemistry,  and  mathematics  in  low-­‐income  countries.  The  support  is  collaborative  and  long-­‐term,  and  is  managed  on  a  collegial  scientist-­‐to-­‐scientist  level  with  a  strong  local  ownership.  Support  is  provided  to  institutionally  based  research  groups,  and  to  scientific  networks  to  facilitates  cooperation  and  sharing  of  resources.  The  work  is  carried  out  in  close  cooperation  with  research  groups  at  more  advanced  host  institutions.  Although  Uppsala  University  is  the  base  of  the  operation,  ISP  functions  as  an  international  program  and  host  laboratories  may  be  located  at  other  Swedish  universities,  in  other  Nordic  and  European  countries,  and  in  the  regions.  This  is  to  meet  the  requests  from  developing  countries  on  their  own  terms.  ISP  also  handles  other  research  programs,  organised  by  Sida.  

The  operation  of  ISP  is  regulated  in  an  ordinance  established  by  the  Swedish  government  in  1988  (UHÄ-­‐FS  1988:18;  SFS  1992:815),  through  the  then  Office  of  Universities  and  Higher  Education  (Universitets-­‐  och  högskoleämbetet;  UHÄ).      3.3   Relevance  for  development  cooperation  of  ISP  support  

A  capacity  for  research  and  higher  education  in  basic  sciences  is  important  for  development.  A  country’s  domestic  competence  in  basic  sciences  may  promote:  • The  quality  of  education  at  all  levels.  • The  development  of  scientific,  critical  thinking  based  on  reproducible  evidence.  • The  development  of  applied  sciences  to  meet  local  needs.  • The  development  of  technology,  innovation,  and  engineering  on  a  local  ownership  basis.  • The  sustainable  use  of  natural  resources.  • The  engagement  in  business  and  global  trade  at  a  level  of  knowledge  matching  global  

partners,  industry  and  investors  • The  development  of  scientific  excellence  and  recognition  

 3.4     ISP’s  alignment  with  Swedish  policies  and  strategies  

3.4.1   Alignment  with  the  goals  and  strategies  of  Uppsala  University      The  operation  of  ISP  agrees  well  with  the  overarching  goals  and  strategies  of  Uppsala  University  (UU),  stating  that  the  university  shall:2  • Pursue  research  and  education  of  the  highest  quality;  • Play  an  active  role  in  global  society;  • Promote  development  and  innovation;  • Be  far-­‐sighted  and  open  to  change  in  all  facets  of  its  work;  and  • Contribute  to  making  our  world  a  better  place.  

For  Uppsala  University  to  reach  its  goals,  it  is  important  to  deepen  and  broaden  its  contacts  with  the  developing  world.  Through  collaboration  across  continents  global  challenges  of  fundamental  significance  may  be  constructively  addressed  and  solved.  

The  UU  Internationalisation  Programme3  promotes  participation  in  international  networks  and  exchange,  and  in  the  development  of  international  research  programs.  The  UU  Cooperation  

                                                                                                                         2  http://www.uu.se/en/about-uu/organisation/goals-strategies-plans/  3  http://regler.uu.se/Detaljsida/?contentId=86953&kategoriId=248  

 9  

Programme  2013-­‐2014,4  suggests  increased  exchange  of  staff  and  students,  more  of  joint  programs  on  Master’s  and  PhD  study  level,  and  increased  international  networking.  

3.4.2   Alignment  with  the  Swedish  government’s  policies  and  strategies      The  Policy  for  Global  Development  2003.  The  Swedish  Policy  for  Global  Development5  stresses  that  scientific  research  and  technology  are  needed  in  addressing  six  listed  development  challenges.      The  New  Development  Policy  2007.  The  policy6  states  that  long-­‐term  development  cooperation  should  be  confined  to  twelve  countries,  Bangladesh,  Bolivia,  Burkina  Faso,  Cambodia,  Ethiopia,  Kenya,  Mali,  Mozambique,  Rwanda,  Tanzania,  Uganda  and  Zambia.  ISP  has  redirected  most  of  its  support  to  research  groups  in  these  focus  countries.    The  New  Africa  Strategy  2007  The  New  Swedish  Africa  Strategy  7  stresses  that  basic  research  capacity  is  a  precondition  for  poverty  reduction  and  social  development.    

Strategy  for  Sida’s  support  for  development  research  cooperation  2009.  In  October  2009,  the  Swedish  government  adopted  a  Strategy  for  Sida’s  support  for  development  research  cooperation  2010–2014.8  To  reach  its  overall  objective,  “to  strengthen  and  develop  research  of  relevance  to  the  fight  against  poverty  in  developing  countries”,  Sida  is  to  focus  on  three  specific  areas:  

• Research  capacity  building  in  developing  countries  and  regions  • Research  of  relevance  to  developing  countries  • Swedish  research  of  relevance  to  developing  countries  

ISP’s  activity  falls  mainly  within  the  first  two  of  the  specific  areas,  the  objectives  of  which  are:    • Partner  countries  and  regional  research  actors  are  better  able  to  plan,  produce  and  use  

research  in  the  fight  against  poverty;  and    • Increased  production  of  research  relevant  to  the  fight  against  poverty  in  developing  

countries.  

Higher  education  in  development  cooperation  2011.  In  a  communication  from  the  Ministry  of  Foreign  Affairs  2011,  Higher  Education  in  the  Develop-­‐ment  Cooperation,9  an  analysis  of  higher  education  within  the  frame  of  Swedish  development  cooperation  and  the  Policy  for  Global  Development  is  presented.  It  is  emphasized  that  a  beneficial  development  of  society  needs  to  be  knowledge  based,  and  that  there  exists  a  link  between  the  development  of  society  and  economy,  and  increasing  resources  given  to  higher  education.  Swedish  institutions  of  higher  education  are  recommended  to  give  more  room  to  cooperation  with  low-­‐income  countries.    Results  strategies  within  Sweden’s  international  aid  2013  In  July  2013  the  Government  published  guidelines  for  its  new  approach  to  development  coope-­‐ration  based  on  results  strategies.10  The  results  strategies  will  be  at  different  levels,  including  at  the  country  level.  The  first  country  to  be  subject  to  a  Swedish  results  strategy,  and  where  ISP  

                                                                                                                         4  http://regler.uu.se/Detaljsida/?contentId=233677&kategoriId=135 (in  Swedish)  5  http://www.sweden.gov.se/sb/d/14232/a/158646;  http://www.sweden.gov.se/sb/d/9807/a/113283  6  http://www.government.se/sb/d/9382/a/86595  7  http://www.government.se/sb/d/9807/a/105300  8  See  the  link  “Strategy  for  Sida's  Support  for  Development  Research  Cooperation”  at  http://www.sidaresearch.se/research-cooperation/about-us.aspx  9  http://www.regeringen.se/sb/d/108/a/164888 (in  Swedish)  10  http://www.regeringen.se/sb/d/4510/a/235815  

 10  

operates,  is  Zambia  (July,  2013).11  Among  expected  results  in  Zambia  are  improved  access  to  quality  health  and  medical  care,  improved  nutrition,  increased  access  to  secure  and  sustainable  energy,  and  more  sustainable  use  of  natural  resources,  all  depending  on  well  developed  basic  sciences.  

 3.5   ISP’s  alignment  with  international  policies  and  strategies    

The  Millenium  Development  Goals  (MDGs)  of  the  UN  An  important  prerequisite  for  attaining  several  of  the  MDGs12  is  the  availability  nationally  of  scientists  trained  in  the  fields  of  basic  sciences    The  Sustainable  Development  Goals  (SDGs)  of  the  UN  Similarly  to  the  MDGs,  reaching  the  proposed  SDGs13  requires  reinforced  resources  in  scientific  research  and  higher  education.  Increased  capacity  in  basic  sciences  can  be  expected  to  facilitate  the  development  that  is  required  to  secure  most  of  the  proposed  goals.  

The  New  Partnership  for  Africa's  Development  (NEPAD)  NEPAD’s  work  is  science  and  knowledge  based,  and  enhanced  basic  sciences  capacity  in  partner  countries  will  increase  their  ability  to  move  forward  in  the  thematic  areas  in  focus  of  NEPAD’s  activities.  

 

 Undergraduate  students  at  Department  of  Chemistry,  Royal  University  of  Phnom  Penh,  Cambodia,  discussing  poster  presentations  of  students’  theses.  (Courtesy  of  IPICS  CAB:01)  

                                                                                                                         11  http://www.regeringen.se/sb/d/5301/a/94008  12  http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/  13 http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org  

 11  

SECTION  4:  STRUCTURE    The  International  Science  Program  (ISP)  is  at  the  Faculty  of  Science  and  Technology  at  Uppsala  University  and  consists  of  three  subprograms:  • International  Programme  in  the  Physical  Sciences  (IPPS,  since  1961)  • International  Programme  in  the  Chemical  Sciences  (IPICS,  since  1970)  • International  Programme  in  the  Mathematical  Sciences  (IPMS,  since  2002)  

 4.1   The  ISP  Board  

On  15  January  2013,  a  new  ISP  Board  was  appointed  for  the  period  1  January  2013  to  31  December  2015.  The  Board  met  twice  in  2013,  12  March,  and  17  December.  It  had  the  following  composition  (44%  female,  56%  male,  including  deputies):  • Professor  Ulf  Danielsson,  Vice-­‐Rector,  Uppsala  University  (Chairperson)  • Professor  Bengt  Gustafsson,  Dept.  Physics  and  Astronomy,  Uppsala  Univ.,  Vice  Chairperson  (until  12  March  2013;  resigned  on  own  request  30  June  2013)    

• Professor  Kersti  Hermansson,  Dept.  Chemistry-­‐Ångström,  Uppsala  University.  (Vice  Chairperson  from  12  May  2013)    

• Ms  Allison  Perrigo,  representative  of  the  student  organisations,  Uppsala  University  • Professor  Claes-­‐Göran  Granqvist,  Dept.  Engineering  Sciences,  Uppsala  University.  • Dr  Irene  Kolare,  Office  for  Science  and  Technology,  Uppsala  University  (until  resignation  on  own  request  before  the  Board  meeting  in  December)    

• Professor  Elzbieta  Glaser,  Dept.  Biochemistry  and  Biophysics,  Stockholm  University.    • Dr  Linnea  Sjöblom,  representative  of  the  personnel  unions,  Uppsala  University.    • Professor  Mohamed  H.A.  Hassan,  The  Global  Network  of  Science  Academies  (IAP)  • Professor  Romain  Murenzi,  The  Academy  of  Science  for  the  Developing  World  (TWAS)  • Professor  Sandra  di  Rocco,  Dept  of  Mathematics,  Royal  Institute  of  Technology  (KTH)  • Professor  Sune  Svanberg,  Div.  Atomic  Physics,  Faculty  of  Engineering,  Lund  University  • Professor  Warwick  Tucker,  Dept.  Mathematics,  Uppsala  University    Deputy  Board  members,  Uppsala  University:  • Professor  Gunilla  Kreiss,  Dept.  Information  Technology,  Uppsala  University  • Professor  Anders  Hagfeldt,  Dept.  Chemistry-­‐Ångström,  Uppsala  University  • Professor  Vernon  Cooray,  Dept.  Engineering  Sciences,  Uppsala  University  

 4.2   The  ISP  Executive  Committee  

The  ISP  Executive  Committee  met  11  February,  27  February,  4  June,  4  October,  and  9  December.  It  had  the  following  composition  (22%  female,  78%  male):    • Professor  Bengt  Gustafsson,  Chairperson  (until  30  June  2013)    • Professor  Kersti  Hermansson,  Chairperson  (from  1  July  2013)  • Professor  Claes-­‐Göran  Granqvist,  Vice  Chairman    • Associate  Professor  Ernst  van  Groningen,  Director  of  IPPS  • Dr  Irene  Kolare  (until  December  2013)  • Mr  Kay  Svensson,  International  Coordinator,  Uppsala  University,  co-­‐opted    • Dr  Leif  Abrahamsson,  Director  of  IPMS    • Associate  Professor  Peter  Sundin,  Director  of  IPICS  • Professor  Warwick  Tucker  

 12  

4.3   The  ISP  Scientific  Reference  Groups  

The  International  Programme  in  the  Chemical  Sciences  (IPICS)  The  IPICS  reference  group  had  its  annual  meeting  in  Arild,  Sweden,  28-­‐30  October.  It  had  the  following  composition  (33%  female,  67%  male):  • Professor  Ameenah  Gurib-­‐Fakim,  CEPHYR  Ltd,  Ebene,  Mauritius.  • Professor  Henrik  Kylin,  Linköping  University,  Linköping,  Sweden.  • Professor  Lars  Ivar  Elding,  Lund  University,  Lund,  Sweden.  

After  the  meeting,  the  participants  visited  the  Dept.  Chemistry  at  Lund  University.  Professor  Prapon  Wilairat,  Mahidol  University,  Bangkok,  Thailand,  resigned  from  the  group  in  April  2013.  

The  International  Programme  in  the  Mathematical  Sciences  (IPMS)  The  IPMS  reference  group  had  its  annual  meeting  in  Munyunyu,  Uganda,  23-­‐25  September  2013.  It  had  the  following  composition  (25%  female,  75%  male):  • Professor  Christer  Kiselman,  Uppsala  University,  Uppsala,  Sweden    • Professor  Fanja  Rakotondrajao,  Université  de  Antananarivo,  Madagascar    • Professor  Mohamed  El  Tom,  Garden  City  College  for  Sci.  and  Technol.,  Khartoum  Sudan  § Professor  Tom  Britton,  Stockholm  University,  Stockholm,  Sweden    

Prof.  Fanja  Rakotondrajao  was  appointed  to  the  group  at  the  Board  meeting  12  March  2013.  

The  International  Programme  in  the  Physical  Sciences  (IPPS)  The  IPPS  reference  group  had  its  annual  meeting  in  Bulawayo,  Zimbabwe,  11-­‐13  September.  It  had  the  following  composition  (20%  female,  80%  male):  • Professor  Ewa  Wäckelgård,  Uppsala  University,  Uppsala,  Sweden  • Professor  Krishna  Garg,  University  of  Rajasthan,  Jaipur,  India  • Professor  Magnus  Willander,  Linköping  University,  Linköping,  Sweden  • Professor  Roland  Roberts,  Uppsala  University,  Uppsala,  Sweden  • Professor  Warawutti  Lohawijarn,  Prince  of  Songkla  University,  Hat  Yai,  Thailand  

 4.4   ISP  Staff  

In  2013,  ISP  had  the  following  staff  members  (46%  female,  54%  male):  

Scientific  staff  • Assoc.  Prof.  Peter  Sundin,  Head  of  ISP,  Director  of  IPICS  • Assoc.  Prof.  Ernst  van  Groningen,  Deputy  Head  of  ISP,  Director  of  IPPS  • Dr  Leif  Abrahamsson,  Director  of  IPMS    • Dr  Linnéa  Sjöblom,  Assistant  Director  of  IPICS    • Assoc.  Prof.  Carla  Puglia,  Assistant  Director  of  IPPS  (50%)  

Administrative  staff    • Mr  Carl  Söderlind,  Program  Adminstrator  (until  tragically  deceased  10  April  2013)  • Ms.  Emma  Elliot,  Program  Assistant  (from  4  February  to  20  December)    • Mr  Hossein  Aminaey,  Program  Administrator          • Dr  Peter  Roth,  Economy  Administrator    • Ms  Pravina  Gajjar,  Program  Administrator  • Dr  Tore  Hållander,  Economy  Administrator    • Ms  Zsuzsanna  Kristófi,  Chief  Economist,  Controller    Scientific  coordinator  (part-­‐time)  • Dr  Paul  Vaderlind,  Dept.  Mathematics,  Stockholm  University,  PACM  Coordinator  (20%)  

 13  

SECTION  5:  PROGRAM-­‐WIDE  RESULTS    

5.1   Activities  

This  Section  briefly  describes  which  research  groups  and  scientific  networks  were  supported  in  2013  (Sections  5.1.1  and  5.1.2,  respectively),  and  which  Sida  assignments  were  carried  out  (Section  5.1.3).  Other  ISP  activities  are  given  in  Section  5.1.4.  

In  2013,  new  support  was  started  to  six  research  groups  and  two  scientific  networks.  There  were  no  cases  where  groups  or  networks  were  phased  out  of  support.  

5.1.1   Research  Groups    Support  to  research  groups  has  since  2008  gradually  been  adapted  to  the  requirement  by  Sida  to  restrict  such  collaboration  to  the  Swedish  “focus  countries”,  as  decided  in  2007  (see  Section  3.4.2  under  “The  New  Development  Policy  2007”).  In  2013,  research  groups  in  countries  outside  the  Swedish  focus  countries  were  in  Laos  and  Zimbabwe  only.  In  the  case  of  Zimbabwe  the  primary  justification  to  continue  support  is  not  to  loose  the  investments  from  earlier  years,  in  molecular  biology  dating  back  to  1990.  In  the  case  of  Laos,  support  commenced  around  2005  and  prematurely  phasing  out  the  collaboration  would  “reset”  most  of  the  academic/scientific  development  in  chemistry  and  physics  achieved  so  far.  

In  2013,  totally  35  research  groups  were  supported  (Tables  1  and  2),  sixteen  in  chemistry,  two  in  mathematics,  and  seventeen  in  physics.  In  eight  of  the  twelwe  Swedish  focus  countries  totally  29  research  groups  were  supported  (Table  1),  including  three  new  chemistry  and  two  new  physics  groups  (Table  3).  Six  research  groups  were  supported  in  two  non-­‐focus  countries  (Table  2),  those  in  Zimbabwe  on  Sida  funding  and  including  one  new  physics  group  (Table  3),  and  those  in  Laos  using  funding  provided  by  Stockholm  University.  Under  the  conditions  of  the  extensions  of  the  Sida  agreement  with  ISP  in  2011  and  2012,  no  support  to  new  groups  could  be  started  on  Sida  funding  those  years,  but  this  restriction  was  released  in  2013.  The  justification  for  starting  support  to  each  new  research  group  is  given  under  the  respective  country  listings  below.    Table  1.  Number  of  research  groups  supported  in  Swedish  focus  countries  using  Sida  funding    Country   IPICS   IPMS   IPPS   Total  Bangladesh   2     2   4  Burkina  Faso   2     1   3  Cambodia   1   1   1   3  Ethiopia   3   1   2   6  Kenya   2     5   7  Mali   1     1   2  Uganda       2   2  Zambia   1     1   2  Total   12   2   15   29    Table  2.  Number  of  research  groups  supported  in  Swedish  non-­‐focus  countries  using  funding  from  Stockholm  University  (in  Laos)  or  Sida  (part  of  IPPS  support  in  Laos,  and  in  Zimbabwe)  Country   IPICS   IPMS   IPPS   Total  Laos   1     1   2  Zimbabwe   3     1   4  Total   4     2   6    

 14  

Table  3.  New  research  group  support,  started  in  2013  Country ISP Code Field of Science Bangladesh IPICS BAN:05 Chemistry; safety of herbal medicines Burkina Faso IPPS BUF:01 Physics; energy effective buildings Ethiopia IPICS ETH:02 Chemistry; pharmacological chemistry Ethiopia IPICS ETH:04 Chemistry; environmental chemistry Uganda IPPS UGA:02 Physics; astronomy and space science Zimbabwe IPPS ZIM:01 Physics; geophysics    Research  groups  supported  in  Swedish  focus  countries  

In  Bangladesh  a  research  group  at  Dept.  Chemistry,  Univ.  Dhaka  (IPICS  BAN:04)  was  supported  in  the  field  of  environmental  and  food  contamination  chemistry,  and  one  at  the  Bangladesh  Univ.  Health  Sciences  (BUHS),  Dhaka,  in  the  field  of  safety  of  herbal  medicines  (IPICS  BAN:05).  During  the  year,  the  latter  group  transferred  to  Daffodil  Univ.  Dhaka.  The  group  had  its  first  year  of  support  in  2013  although  its  original  application  was  positively  evaluated  already  in  2011.  The  group  is  being  developed  by  a  PhD  graduate  from  IPICS  BAN:04,  to  allow  for  continued  capacity  building  in  this  nearby  field  of  research.  

Research  collaboration  between  Bangladesh  Univ.  Engineering  and  Technology  (BUET)  and  the  Atomic  Energy  Centre(AECD),  Dhaka,  was  supported  in  the  field  of  magnetic  materials  (IPPS  BAN:02).  Support  in  medical  physics  was  provided  to  a  group  at  the  Dept.  Biomedical  Physics  &  Technology,  University  of  Dhaka  (IPPS  BAN:04).    

In  Burkina  Faso  two  research  groups  at  the  Dept.  Chemistry,  Univ.  Ouagadougou,  were  supported,  one  on  natural  products  research  (IPICS  BUF:01)  and  one  on  clay  mineralogy  (IPICS  BUF:02).  Support  to  the  Department  of  Physics  started  in  2013  in  the  area  of  energy  effective  buildings  (IPPS  BUF:01).  The  aim  to  is  come  up  with  new  technologies  for  controlling  the  indoor  climate,  and  thus  saving  on  costs  for  air  condition,  using  local  materials.  Start  of  support  to  physics  in  Burkina  Faso  was    

In  Cambodia  a  research  group  at  the  Dept.  Physics  (IPPS  CAM:01)  at  the  Royal  Univ.  Phnom  Penh  (RUPP)  was  supported,  and  a  research  group  at  the  RUPP  Dept.  Chemistry,  in  the  field  of  environmental  chemistry  (IPICS  CAB:01).  IPMS  provided  support  to  the  RUPP  Department  of  Mathematics  (IPMS  CAB:01).  

In  Ethiopia  support  was  provided  to  two  research  groups  at  Addis  Ababa  Univ.  (AAU),  at  the  Depts.  Chemistry  and  Physics,  respectively,  and  working  mainly  in  the  field  of  conducting  polymers  with  photovoltaic  applications  (IPICS  ETH:01  and  IPPS  ETH:01).  Another  group  at  AAU  Dept.Physics  is  supported  in  the  field  of  seismology  (IPPS  ETH:02).  Support  was  also  continued  to  the  AAU  Dept.  Mathematics  (IPMS  ETH:01).    

In  2013,  support  started  to  two  new  groups  in  chemistry,  both  led  by  scientists  that  graduated  with  PhDs  in  earlier  phases  of  the  Sida  bilateral  program  with  AAU.  One  of  the  groups  works  in  the  field  of  pharmacological  chemistry  (IPICS  ETH:02),  at  School  of  Pharmacy,  AAU,  and  the  other  in  the  field  of  environmental  chemistry,  at  the  AAU  Dept.  Chemistry  (IPICS  ETH:04).  The  support  is  intended  to  safeguard  these  human  resources,  developed  with  Sida  funding,  and  allow  for  continued  capacity  building  in  these  fields  of  research.  The  groups  had  their  first  year  of  support  in  2013  although  its  original  application  was  positively  evaluated  already  in  2011  and  2012,  respectively.  

In  Kenya  five  physics  research  groups  were  supported.  Four  of  these  are  at  Univ.  Nairobi  (UoNBI),  and  one  is  at  the  Univ.  Eldoret.  They  work  in  the  fields  of  X-­‐ray  fluorescence  (IPPS  KEN:01/2),  nanostructured  solar  cells  (IPPS  KEN:02),  photovoltaics  (IPPS  KEN:03),  applied  laser  physics  (IPPS  KEN:04),  and  seismology  (IPPS  KEN:05).  Support  was  provided  also  to  two  

 15  

research  groups  at  the  Dept.  Chemistry,  UoNBI,  in  the  fields  of  coordination  chemistry  (IPICS  KEN:01)  and  natural  products  chemistry  (IPICS  KEN:02).  

In  Mali,  at  Université  des  Sciences,  des  Techniques  et  des  Technologies  de  Bamako,  a  research  group  on  clay  mineralogy  was  supported  at  Dept.  Chemistry,  (IPICS  MAL:01),  and  a  research  group  in  the  field  of  spectral  imaging  (IPPS  MAL:01)  at  the  Dept.  Physics.  

In  Uganda  support  was  provided  to  a  research  group  in  physics  (IPPS  UGA:01/1)  at  Makerere  Univ.,  in  the  field  of  materials  science,  and  to  a  new  research  group  in  astronomy  and  space  science  at  the  Mbarara  University  of  Science  and  Technology,  Mbabara  (IPPS  UGA:02).  With  the  coming  of  the  Square  Kilometer  Array  (SKA),  an  international  1,5  billion  Euro  project  in  South  Africa,  and  other  African  countries  South  of  the  equator,  there  will  be  a  large  demand  for  local  manpower,  both  scientific  and  technical  in  the  coming  decade.  The  activity  of  the  supported  research  group  aims  to  align  with  this  demand,  and  contribute  to  train  local  scientists  to  be  part  of  this  endeavour.      

In  Zambia,  at  Univ.  Zambia,  a  research  group  at  the  Dept.  Physics  was  supported  in  the  field  of  materials  science  (IPPS  ZAM:01),  and  a  research  group  at  the  Dept.  Chemistry  in  the  field  of  conducting  polymers  (IPICS  ZAM:01).  

It  should  be  noted  that  support  in  the  field  of  mathematics  was  provided  also  to  the  Univ.  Ouagadougou,  Burkina  Faso,  but  within  the  scope  of  the  network  IPMS  BURK:01  (PDE  Modeling  and  Control;  see  Section  5.1.2).  This  network  includes  mathematics  departments  at  universities  in  Mauritania  and  Senegal.  Similarly,  mathematics  groups  at  Makerere  Univ.,  Uganda,  National  Univ.  Rwanda  and  the  Kigali  Inst.  Sci.  Technol.,  Rwanda,  Univ.  Nairobi,  Kenya,  Univ.  Dar  es  Salaam,  Tanzania,  and  Univ.  Zambia,  were  supported  through  the  East  African  Universities  Mathematics  Program  (EAUMP;  see  Section  5.1.2).  

Research  groups  supported  in  Swedish  non-­‐focus  countries  

In  Laos  one  research  group  in  environmental  chemistry  was  supported  at  Dept.  Chemistry  (IPICS  LAO:01),  National  Univ.  Laos  (NUOL),  and  one  research  group  in  geoscience  at  NUOL  Dept.  Physics  (IPPS  LAO:01),  both  using  funding  provided  by  Stockholm  University.  The  group  IPPS  LAO:01  was  partly  supported  also  using  Sida  funding,  to  allow  for  a  PhD  student  on  sandwich  training  in  Thailand  to  conclude  his  work  with  graduation  expected  in  2014.  Minor  support  was  also  provided  to  the  NUOL  Dept.  Mathematics,  allowing  two  female  staff  members  to  participate  in  an  international  conference  in  Mandalay,  Myanmar.  

In  Zimbabwe,  IPICS  supported  three  research  groups.  One  works  in  the  field  of  pharmaco-­‐kinetics-­‐pharmacodynamics,  at  the  African  Inst.  Biomed.  Sci.  Technol.  (IPICS  AiBST),  Harare  (associated  with  Univ.  Zimbabwe).  Another  group  is  working  in  the  field  of  biomolecular  interactions  (IPICS  ZIM:01),  at  the  Dept.  Chemistry,  Univ.  Zimbabwe,  Harare.  The  third  is  working  in  the  field  of  biochemical  toxicology  (IPICS  ZIM:02),  at  the  Dept.  Environmental  Science  and  Health,  National  Univ.  Sci.  Technol.  (NUST)  in  Bulawayo.    

In  2013,  IPPS  re-­‐started  its  support  to  a  research  group  at  NUST  in  the  field  of  geophysics  and  ground  water  studies  (IPPS  ZIM:01).  The  support  is  intended  to  facilitate  the  scientific  contribution  of  the  group  as  an  already  established  member  of  the  Eastern  and  Southern  Africa  Regional  Seismological  Working  Group  (ESARSWG;  see  Section  5.1.2),  where  Zimbabwe  holds  the  southernmost  area  of  the  Rift  Valley,  in  focus  of  the  ESARSWG’s  activities.  The  research  group  also  carries  out  a  comprehensive  study  of  the  ground  water  in  the  city  of  Bulawayo,  in  collaboration  with  the  Departments  of  Chemistry  and  Microbiology,  with  the  purpose  of  providing  the  local  population  with  safe  drinking  water.    

     

 16  

5.1.2   Scientific  Networks    South-­‐South  regional  scientific  cooperation  generates  critical  mass  in  selected  research  fields  and  provides  extensive  contacts,  allows  for  complementary  activities,  gives  access  to  advanced  equipment,  and  contributes  the  human  capital  needed  for  good  postgraduate  education.  Therefore,  ISP  provides  support  not  only  to  research  groups  but  also  to  regional  scientific  networks.14  In  2013,  totally  19  scientific  networks  were  supported  (Table  4),  two  of  which  received  their  first  year  of  support  (Table  5).  

Table  4.  Number  of  scientific  networks  supported  by  ISP,  by  region  Region   IPICS   IPMS   IPPS   Total  Africa   8   2   4   14  Asia   3   0   0   3  Latin  America   1   0   1   2  Total   12   2   5   19    Table  5.  New  scientific  network  support,  starting  in  2013  Coordinated from ISP Code Field of Science Burkina Faso IPICS ANEC Chemistry; electroanalytical chemistry Burkina Faso IPICS RAFPE Chemistry; environmental chemistry  Scientific  networks  in  the  field  of  chemistry  

ALNAP  -­‐  African  Laboratory  for  Natural  Products,  with  the  objective  to  cooperate  in  natural  products  research  between  laboratories  in  neighboring  countries.  

ANCAP  -­‐  African  Network  for  the  Chemical  Analysis  of  Pesticides,  with  the  objective  to  safeguarding  public  health  and  the  environment,  and  ensuring  the  safety  of  African  agricultural  and  aquatic  products,  making  them  competitive  on  the  world  market,  and  thereby  contributing  to  the  continent’s  poverty  eradication  endeavors.    

ANEC  -­‐  African  Network  of  Electroanalytical  Chemists  with  the  objective  to  foster  research  activities  in  the  field  of  electroanalytical  chemistry  among  African  scientists,  and  to  promote  and  encourage  the  use  of  electrochemical  approaches  in  African  basic  science  as  well  as  applications  in  for  example  environmental  sciences  and  food  security.  The  network  had  its  first  year  of  support  in  2013  although  its  original  application  was  positively  evaluated  already  in  2011.  

ANFEC  -­‐  Asian  Network  of  Research  on  Food  and  Environment  Contaminants.  In  order  to  build  upon  the  progress  facilitated  by  the  ISP  support  to  environmental  chemistry  in  the  region,  and  to  further  develop  the  capacity  for  reliable  trace  analysis  of  pollutants,  this  scientific  network  was  proposed  in  2011  by  researchers  from  NUOL  in  Laos,  Dhaka  University  in  Bangladesh  and  RUPP  in  Cambodia.  In  2012,  the  network  was  funded  using  the  contribution  to  ISP  from  Stockholm  University.  The  network  had  its  first  year  of  Sida-­‐funded  support  in  2013  although  its  original  application  was  positively  evaluated  already  in  2011.  The  network  has  the  following  main  objectives:  • Common  training  regarding  analytical  skills  and  quality  assurance.  • Exchange  of  staff  for  training  and  development  purposes.  • An  annual  thematic  workshop.  • Mutual  verification  of  analytical  results  and  development  of  quality  assurance.    ANRAP  -­‐  Asian  Network  of  Research  on  Antidiabetic  Plants,  with  the  objective  to  develop  cooperation  between  scientists  working  in  the  field  of  antidiabetic  plant  research.    

                                                                                                                         14  For  more  details  of  ISP’s  support  to  scientific  networks,  see  Kiselman,  C.  (2011);  http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:393463&rvn=1;  see  also  http://www.isp.uu.se  

 17  

LANBIO  -­‐  Latin  American  Network  for  Research  in  Bioactive  Natural  Compounds,  with  the  objective  to  promote  natural  product  research  in  South  America.    

NABSA  -­‐  Network  for  Analytical  and  Bioassay  Services  in  Africa,  with  the  objective  to  give  other  African  scientists  access  to  the  analytical  and  laboratory  facilities  and  equipment  that  exists  in  the  Dept.  Chem.,  Univ.  Botswana.  

NAPRECA  -­‐  Natural  Products  Research  Network  for  Eastern  and  Central  Africa,  with  the  objective  to  initiate,  develop  and  promote  research  in  the  area  of  natural  products  chemistry  in  Eastern  and  Central  Africa.  

NITUB  -­‐  Network  of  Instrument  Technical  Personnel  and  User  Scientists  of  Bangladesh,  with  the  objective  to  improve  the  capabilities  in  handling,  maintaining,  trouble-­‐shooting  and  repairing  scientific  instruments  in  Bangladesh.    

RABiotech  -­‐  West  African  Biotechnology  Network,  with  the  objective  to  ensure  and  reinforce  research  training  in  biotechnology,  and  to  share  research  on  local  challenges.  The  network  aims  at  limiting  the  brain  drain  of  the  South  towards  North.  

RAFPE  -­‐  Research  Network  in  Africa  on  Pollution  of  the  Environment,  with  the  objective  to  share  knowledge  and  pursue  a  joint  program  with  the  aim  of  reducing  the  risks  with  pesticides  and  other  water  pollutants  in  Western  Africa.  

SEANAC  -­‐  Southern  and  Eastern  Africa  Network  for  Analytical  Chemists,  with  the  objective  to  promote  analytical  chemistry  in  the  region  by  research  collaboration,  training,  and  information  sharing,  to  facilitate  inventory,  access,  operation,  maintenance  and  repair  of  analytical  equipment,  and  to  collaborate  with  organizations  of  similar  aims.  

Scientific  networks  in  the  field  of  mathematics  

BURK:01  -­‐  PDE,  Modeling  and  Control,  aiming  at  applications  of  mathematics,  but  also  to  strengthen  other  areas  of  mathematics.  The  network  includes  joint  research,  with  links  to  mathematicians  in  the  West  African  region  and  the  international  scientific  community.  The  network  consists  of  researchers  in  mathematics  at  Univ.  Ouagadougou  (Burkina  Faso),  at  Gaston  Berger  Univ.  (Senegal),  at  Univ.  Nouakchott  (Mauritania),  at  Univ.  Cocody-­‐Abidjan  (Ivory  Coast),  and  at  Université  des  Sciences,  des  Techniques  et  des  Technologies  de  Bamako  (Mali).  

EAUMP  -­‐  Eastern  African  Universities  Mathematics  Programme,  with  the  objective  to  enhance  postgraduate,  and  particularly  PhD,  training  to  build  capacity  in  universities  in  the  region,  and  training  advanced  mathematics  researchers  needed  in  other  socio-­‐economic  sectors.  The  network  consists  of  the  departments  of  mathematics  at  Makerere  Univ.  (Uganda),  National  Univ.  Rwanda  and  Kigali  Institute  of  Science  and  Technology  (Rwanda),  Univ.  Dar  es  Salaam  (Tanzania),  Univ.  Nairobi  (Kenya),  and  Univ.  Zambia  (Zambia)).  

Scientific  Networks  in  the  field  of  physics    

AFSIN  -­‐  African  Spectral  Imaging  Network,  with  the  objective  to  bring  the  network's  research  groups  to  international  standard  in  the  field  of  spectroscopy  and  spectral  imaging,  with  application  in  medicine,  environment  and  agriculture.  

ESARSWG  -­‐  Eastern  and  Southern  Africa  Regional  Seismological  Working  Group,  with  the  objective  to  monitor  seismic  activities  of  the  East  Africa  Rift  System  through  operation  of  seismic  stations  in  nine  countries  and  collectively  analyse  data.  This  will  promote  building  regional  capacity  with  regard  to  both  equipment  and  personnel  to  enable  seismology  related  research  to  be  carried  out.  

 18  

LAM  -­‐  African  Laser,  Atomic,  Molecular  and  Optical  Sciences  Network,  with  the  objective  to  promote  the  physics  of  lasers,  atoms  and  molecules,  and  their  applications,  as  well  as  to  develop  scientific  cooperation  in  these  fields  in  Africa.  

MSSEESA  -­‐  Materials  Science  and  Solar  Energy  Network  for  Eastern  and  Southern  Africa,  with  the  aim  to  make  use  of  more  costly  equipment  in  an  efficient  way  and  to  strengthen  the  quality  of  physics  education  and  to  harmonize  the  MSc  and  PhD  programs  in  the  region.  

NADMICA  -­‐  Nature  Induced  Disaster  Mitigation  in  Central  America,  with  the  objective  to  enhance  research  in  Natural  Disaster  Mitigation  in  Central  America.  This  was  originally  a  regional  Sida  project  coordinated  by  ISP  (on  the  Swedish  side)  and  the  Consejo  Superior  de  Universitario  Centroamericano  (CSUCA,  in  Guatemala,  on  the  Central  American  side).  From  1  January  2012,  after  the  termination  of  the  Sida  regional  agreement,  ISP  continued  to  support  the  network  to  allow  the  students  from  Guatemala,  El  Salvador,  Honduras,  Nicaragua,  Costa  Rica  and  Panamá  to  conclude  their  studies.    

5.1.3   Sida  Assignments    This  report  generally  regards  only  the  operation  of  ISP  according  to  Sida  Agreement  75000514  /  2008-­‐001272.  The  collaboration  with  Sida  in  2013,  however,  included  the  following  commissioned  assignments,  specified  by  separate  agreements.  Any  results  of  these  programs  are  accounted  for  separately,  and  are  not  given  in  detail  in  this  annual  report.  

Mozambique.  The  current  Sida  bilateral  agreement  with  Universidad  Eduardo  Mondlane  (UEM),  Maputo  Mozambique,  was  signed  in  2011.  In  October  2011  ISP  was  assigned  to  manage  the  Swedish  coordination  of  the  programme,  comprising  12  subprogrammes  with  collaborating  partners  in  Sweden.  The  original  agreement  for  this  coordination,  between  Sida  and  ISP,  covered  the  years  2011-­‐2013,  and  in  December  2013  it  was  extended  to  the  period  2014  –  2015.  The  number  of  students  to  be  trained  in  Sweden  is  approximately  100.  The  Swedish  institutions  involved  in  2013  were  Chalmers,  Gothenburg  University,  Karolinska  Institute,  Luleå  Technical  University,  Lund  University,  Mälardalen  University,  Örebro  University,  the  Royal  Instiute  of  Technology  (KTH),  Stockholm  University,  the  Swedish  Institute  for  Food  and  Biotechnology  (SIK),  the  Swedish  Institute  for  Communicable  Disease  Control  (SMI),  the  Swedish  University  of  Agricultural  Sciences  (SLU),  Umeå  University,  and  Uppsala  University.    

In  2013,  ISP  hosted  a  UEM-­‐ISP  workshop  in  Lund,  11-­‐12  November.  The  focus  of  the  workshop  was  postgraduate  training  at  UEM.  The  workshop  gathered  UEM-­‐students  on  training  in  Sweden,  their  Swedish  supervisors,  and  Sida  and  UEM  representatives.15  

Beside  this  engagement  with  UEM,  ISP  is  also  coordinating  the  activites  in  Sweden  of  the  subprogramme  in  mathematics,  under  the  overall  bilateral  programme.  

Tanzania.  ISP  continued  to  coordinate  the  Swedish  side  of  the  Sida  bilateral  program  with  the  Faculty  of  Science  at  University  of  Dar  es  Salaam  (UDSM),  with  respect  to  the  Department  of  Geology.    

Uganda.  At  Makerere  University,  Kampala,  Uganda,  ISP  continued  to  coordinate  the  subprograms  with  DICTS,  Library,  and  the  College  of  Natural  Sciences.  

Payment  of  subsistence  allowances  to  Sida  bilateral  students.  ISP  continued  the  Sida  assignment  to  administer  the  payment  of  PhD  student  allowances  and  insurance  costs  for  PhD  students  who  receive  support  from  Sida  in  Swedish  bilateral  agreements  on  research  cooperation  with  Rwanda,  Tanzania,  Uganda  and  Bolivia.    

                                                                                                                         15  See  http://www.isp.uu.se/bilateral-programs/Mozambique/mozambique-news-and-events/workshop2013/  

 19  

5.1.4   Other  Activities    Collaboration    Al  Baha  University:  In  2013,  ISP  continued  cooperation  under  the  “Service  Contract  of  Academic  Support  between  Al  Baha  University  (ABU),  Saudi  Arabia,  and  Uppsala  University,  International  Science  Programme  (ISP),  Sweden”,  2012-­‐2014.    

The  main  activities  were  to  initiate  a  four-­‐year  project  aiming  at  developing  the  computer  science  education  at  ABU  (Al  Baha  Optimizing  Teaching  and  Learning;  ABOLT).  For  this  purpose,  UU  staff  visited  ABU  twice  during  the  year,  in  February  and  in  June.  A  third  joint  planning  meeting  for  UU  and  ABU  was  held  in  Macau  at  the  First  International  Conference  on  Learning  and  Teaching  in  Computing  and  Engineering  (LaTiCE)  in  March.  The  ABOLT  project  started  during  with  first  two  meetings  at  ABU,  in  September  and  November,  on  a  yearlong  staff  development  course:  A  scholarly  approach  to  learning  and  teaching  computer  science.  

In  October,  an  ABU  staff  member,  Mrs.  Azza  Alghamdi,  was  admitted  to  PhD  studies  in  mathematics  at  Uppsala  University.    

The  expenditures  2013  were  distributed  to  ISP  coordination  (26%),  and  to  development  of  programs  in  computer  science  (53%).  Indirect  costs  (“overhead”)  amounted  to  21%.    

Linköping  University  (LiU)  and  University  of  Rwanda  (UR):  The  new  Sida  bilateral  programme  phase  in  Rwanda  started  1  July  2013.  Following  successful  participation  in  the  new  sida  “Open  Call  Process”,  ISP  is  engaged  in  the  subprogramme  on  Research  Management,  with  Linköping  Univ.  in  Sweden  and  the  Directorate  for  Planning  and  Development  at  Univ.  Rwanda.  

Hossein  Aminaey  and  Leif  Abrahamsson  participated  in  the  program  startup  meeting  in  Butare,  Rwanda,  in  August.  Leif  Abrahamsson  and  Peter  Sundin  hosted  a  project-­‐planning  meeting  in  Uppsala  in  September,  focusing  on  the  development  of  training  programs  at  UR.    National  Mathematical  Centre  (NMC),  Abuja,  Nigeria:  One  NMC  staff  member,  Mr.  Olufunminiyi  Abiri,  continued  PhD  training  at  Luleå  Univ.  Technology  (LTU),  Luleå,  Sweden.      Royal  Swedish  Academy  of  Sciences  (KVA):  ISP,  in  collaboration  with  KVA,  the  Swedish  Secretariat  for  Environmental  Earth  System  Science  (SSEESS)  and  the  European  Academies  of  Science  Advisory  Council  (AESAC)  continued  the  preparation  of  a  series  of  workshop  on  the  theme  “Energy  at  the  Village  Level”,  in  a  meeting  hosted  at  Uppsala  University  in  August.  

The  first  workshop  will  be  held  in  Arusha,  Tanzania,  in  2014,  and  subsequent  workshops  are  planned  2015-­‐2016  in  Southeast  Asia  (Malaysia),  West  Africa  (Ghana),  Latin  America  (Mexico),  as  well  as  a  final  round-­‐up  meeting  in  the  UK.  More  information  is  available  on  the  Smart  Villages  initiative’s  website  at e4sv.org.    Stockholm  University  (SU):  Following  an  agreement  signed  in  December  2010,  the  Faculty  of  Science  at  SU,  Sweden,  provides  a  yearly  contribution  2011-­‐2015.    

The  expenditures  2013  were  distributed  to  the  continued  development  of  Pan  African  Centre  for  Mathematics  (26%),  to  other  mathematics  related  activities  (22%),  to  research  groups  in  Laos  (40%),  and  to  service  costs  of  mass  spectrometry  at  Addis  Ababa  University  (3%).  Indirect  costs  (“overhead”)  amounted  to  9%.  A  meeting  with  the  steering  group  was  held  12  June  2013.    Thailand  Research  Fund  (TRF):  The  conditions  for  renewing  the  former  TRF-­‐ISP  agreement  was  further  explored.  In  April  2013,  Peter  Sundin  participated  in  a  meeting  hosted  by  TRF  in  Bangkok,  Thailand,  with  representatives  of  Thailand  International  Development  Cooperation  

 20  

Agency  (TICA)  and  the  Development  Cooperation  Section  of  the  Swedish  Embassy  in  Bangkok,  where  the  expected  forms  of  cooperation  were  further  settled.      In  September,  TICA  representatives  Ms  Angsana  Sihapitak  (Deputy  Director-­‐General),  Ms  Prapassorn  Thanusingha  (Chief  of  European  Countries  Cooperation),  and  Ms  Chachsaran  Lertkiattiwong  (Thai  -­‐  Swedish  Cooperation  Officer),  together  with  Royal  Thai  Embassy  representative  Ms  Pachongwat  Yuckpan  (First  Secretary),  visited  Sweden.  Peter  Sundin  participated  in  the  delegation’s  meeting  with  Sida,  and  hosted  a  program  at  UU  where  the  delegation  met  Vice  Chancellor  Eva  Åkesson,  and  had  a  seminar  at  the  Ångström  Laboratory  with  Swedish  supervisors  of  Thai  students  trained  in  Sweden.  Peter  Sundin  gave  a  talk,  “The  International  Science  Programme  at  Uppsala  University,  Sweden  –  Experience,  Results,  Opportunities,  and  a  History  of  Cooperation  with  the  Scientific  Community  in  Thailand”.    Fellow  evenings    ISP  hosted  fellow  evenings  7  March  (at  ISP  premises),  23  April  (at  Restaurant  Korfu,  Uppsala),  and  7  November  (at  ISP  premises),  each  with  20-­‐30  participants.  On  7  Nov.,  a  representative  of  Uppsala  Association  of  International  Affairs  presented  the  organization  and  its  activities.    Meetings,  conference  participation,  presentations,  and  other  such  activities  of  ISP  staff    19  February:  Peter  Sundin  gave  an  invited  talk  “The  International  Science  Programme  at  Upp-­‐sala  University  –  More  than  50  years  experience  of  capacity  building  in  basic  sciences  in  low-­‐income  countries”,  at  Uppsala  University  Diplomatic  Forum,  “Swedish  International  Develop-­‐ment  Cooperation  and  Sida  –  Current  Chenges  and  Future  Challenges”,  Sida,  Stockholm  Sweden.    4-­‐6  April:  Peter  Sundin  participated  in  the  Royal  Golden  Jubilee  Ph.D.  Congress  XIV,  The  Thailand  Research  Fund,  Pattaya,  Thailand,  and  gave  an  invited  talk,  “The  International  Science  Programme  at  Uppsala  University  –  Experiences  and  Opportunities”.    19-­‐21  April:  Leif  Abrahamsson  participated  in  the  annual  meeting  of  the  EMS-­‐CDC  (European  Mathematical  Society,  Commission  for  Developing  Countries)  held  in  Linköping.    3  May:  Linnéa  Sjöblom,  Peter  Roth  and  Peter  Sundin  arranged  and  participated  in  an  ISP-­‐SLU  seminar  on  “Zinc  and  Phosphorus  availability  in  soils  in  Mali”  at  the  Dept.  Soil  and  Environment,  SLU,  Uppsala,  Sweden,  where  two  visiting  Mali  student’s  presented  and  discussed  their  research  with  SLU  soil  scientists.  (IPICS  MAL:01)    6-­‐7  May:  ISP  and  SLU  arranged  the  workhop  “Collaboration  with  Developing  Countries  as  a  Strategic  Component  in  the  Internationalisation  of  Higher  Education”  at  the  “Program  Days  for  Higher  Education”,  organized  by  the  Swedish  Council  for  Higher  Education.  Carla  Puglia  gave  a  talk  “Uppsala  University  International  policy  and  activities  -­‐  Activities  and  projects  with  developing  countries:  International  Office,  International  Science  Programme”.      6-­‐9  May:  Peter  Sundin  participated  in  the  19th  Conference  of  the  Islamic  World  Academy  of  Science,  Dhaka;  Bangladesh,  and  gave  an  invited  talk  “The  International  Science  Programme  in  Bangladesh:  Self  Interest  or  Empowerment?”  co-­‐authored  with  Ms.  Tatjana  Kuhn,  who  also  contributed  with  a  poster.    12-­‐13  May:  Carla  Puglia  and  Ernst  van  Groningen  visited  the  Abdus  Salam  International  Centre  for  Theoretical  Physics  (ICTP),  Trieste,  Italy,  to  discuss  continued  collaboration  and  coordination  between  ISP  and  ICTP.      

 21  

15  May:  Ernst  van  Groningen  was  elected  as  member  (ex-­‐officio)  of  the  board  of  the  “Physics  for  Development”  group  of  the  European  Physical  Society.  He  attended  the  board  meeting  at  the  École  Polytechnique  Fédérale  in  Lausanne,  Switzerland.    2-­‐3  September:  Peter  Sundin  participated  in  the  6th  SETAC  Africa  Conference,  Lusaka,  Zambia,  and  gave  a  talk,  “ISP  and  Environmental  Chemistry  in  Africa”.      25  September:  Peter  Sundin  participated  in  the  conference  Agricultural  Research  for  Development,  SLU,  Uppsala,  Sweden,  and  gave  a  talk,  “Capacity  Development  in  Environmental  Chemistry  in  Low-­‐Income  Countries”.      1  October:  The  Sida-­‐ISP  Annual  Review  Meeting  was  held  at  Sida,  Stockholm.    4  October:  Ernst  van  Groningen  and  Peter  Sundin  met  Professor  John  Mathiason,  Syracuse  University,  USA,  together  with  Sida  staff,  at  Sida  Stockholm,  to  discuss  the  refinement  of  ISP’s  RBM  logical  framework.    1-­‐3  November:  Leif  Abrahamsson  participated  in  the  6th  International  Conference  on  Science  and  Mathematics  Education  in  Developing  Countries,  Mandalay,  Myanmar,  and  gave  a  talk  “Support  to  Basic  Sciences  in  Developing  Countries”.    11-­‐15  November:  Ernst  van  Groningen  participated  in  the  3rd  Academic  Conference  on  Natural  Science  for  Master  and  PhD  Students  from  Asean  Countries,  Phnom  Penh  Cambodia.  He  gave  two  talks:  one  scientific  presentation  “Exoplanets”  and  one  on  ISP,  about  in  particular  ISP’s  past  and  present  activities  in  Southeast  Asia.    24-­‐26  November:  Leif  Abrahamsson  participated  in  the  SAMSA  (Southern  Africa  Mathematical  Sciences  Association)  meeting  held  in  Cape  Town,  South  Africa.    1-­‐4  December:  Peter  Sundin  participated  in  the  SANORD  4th  Biennial  International  Conference,  Lilongwe,  Malawi,  and  contributed  to  a  presentation  of  Uppsala  University  with  a  talk  “Does  ISP  make  the  world  a  better  place  by  support  to  Basic  Sciences  in  Low-­‐Income  Countries?”.        Minor  Field  Studies  program    In  2013,  for  the  second  year,  ISP  offered  Swedish  students  stipends  in  the  Sida-­‐financed  Minor  Field  Study  (MFS)  program,  to  carry  out  thesis  work  at  institutions  in  eligible  countries  (www.isp.uu.se/minor-field-studies).  Thirteen  students  were  awarded  MFS  stipends,  and  in  two  cases  support  for  co-­‐applicants  were  arranged  through  ISP  funding  to  the  host  group  (Table  6).    Publications,  etc.    P.  Sundin  (2013).  The  International  Programme  in  the  Chemical  Sciences  (IPICS):  40  Years  of  Support  to  Chemistry  in  Africa.  In:  A.  Gurib-­‐Fakim  and  J.N.Eloff  (Eds.),  Chemistry  for  Sustainable  Development  in  Africa.  Springer-­‐Verlag  Berlin  Heidelberg.    Ernst  van  Groningen  was  a  guest  editor  for  a  special  issue  of  the  Wiley  journal:  Geografiska  Annaler  A,  Physical  Geology.  Many  of  the  PhD  students  on  the  IPPS  NADMICA  activity  have  submitted  manuscripts  to  the  special  issue.  It  will  be  published  in  print  early  2015,  but  some  of  the  articles  will  appear  on-­‐line  as  open  access  already  in  2014.      ISP’s  Strategic  Plan  2013-­‐20171  was  published  at  ISP’s  website  in  July  2013.          

 22  

Table  6.  Minor  field  studies  students  receiving  support  through  ISP  in  2013.  (67%  F,  33%  M)  Host Country

Student, affiliation

Gender

Study level

Supervisor, affiliation in Sweden in Host Country

Bangladesh   Anna  Landahl  Linköping  Univ.

F MSc Henrik  Kylin,  Linköping  Univ

Nilufar  Nahar,  Univ.  Dhaka  (IPICS  BAN:04)

Bangladesh   Jennie  Haag  Linköping  Univ.

F MSc Henrik  Kylin,    Linköping  Univ.

Nilufar  Nahar,  Univ.  Dhaka  (IPICS  BAN:04)

Burkina  Faso   Emma  Lundin,  SLU,  Uppsala

F MSc Ingmar  Persson,    SLU,  Uppsala  

B.  Guel/S.Pare,  Univ.  Ouagadougou  (IPICS  BUF:02)

Burkina  Faso   Hans  Öckerman,  SLU,  Uppsala

M MSc Ingmar  Persson,    SLU,  Uppsala

B.  Guel/S.Pare,  Univ.  Ouagadougou  (IPICS  BUF:02)

Burkina  Faso   Staffan  Persson  Uppsala  Univ.

M BSc Patrice  Godonou,  Uppsala  Univ

Moussa  Sogouti,  Univ.  Ouagadougou  (IPPS  BUF:01)

Costa  Rica   Freja  Söderberg,  Uppsala  Univ.

F MSc Anna  Rutgersson,  Uppsala  Univ.

Eric  Alfaro,  Univ.  Costa  Rica  (IPPS  NADMICA)

Kenya   Jill  Wellholm  Uppsala  Univ.

F BSc Uwe  Zimmermann,  Uppsala  Univ

Justus  Simiyu,  Univ.  Nairobi  (IPPS  KEN:02)

Kenya   Karin  Rosén16  Uppsala  Univ.

F BSc Uwe  Zimmermann,  Uppsala  Univ.    

Justus  Simiyu,  Univ.  Nairobi  (IPPS  KEN:02)

Kenya   Moa  Mackegård  Uppsala  Univ.

F BSc Uwe  Zimmermann,  Uppsala  Univ

Justus  Simiyu,  Univ.  Nairobi  (IPPS  KEN:02)

Kenya   C.C.  Kirchmann16  Uppsala  Univ.

M BSc Annica  Nilsson,  Uppsala  Univ

K.  Kaduki,  Univ.  Nairobi  (IPPS  KEN:04)

Kenya   Elin  Lundin  Uppsala  Univ.

F BSc Annica  Nilsson,  Uppsala  Univ

K.  Kaduki,  Univ.  Nairobi  (IPPS  KEN:04)

Kenya   Jacob  Andrén  Uppsala  Univ.

M BSc Annica  Nilsson,  Uppsala  Univ

K.  Kaduki,  Univ.  Nairobi  (IPPS  KEN:04)

Malawi   Hanna  Jansson  Uppsala  Univ.

F MSc Jan  E.S.  Bergman,  Swed.  Inst.  Space  Phys.

Chomora  Mikeka,  Univ.  Malawi

Malawi   Mikael  Gidstedt,  Uppsala  Univ.

M MSc Jan  E.S.  Bergman,  Swed.  Inst.  Space  Phys.  

Chomora  Mikeka,  Univ.  Malawi

Uganda   Anita  Nakagulire  Uppsala  Univ.

F MSc Lars  Oestreicher,  Uppsala  Univ  

Frank  Kitumba,  Makerere  Univ.  (Sida  bilateral)

 Results  Based  Management    Applicants  in  the  year’s  IPICS  reference  group  meetings  were  introduced  to  the  RBM  requirements  and  to  strengthened  financial  management  and  reporting  routines  at  ISP.      Visiting  Persons  and  Delegations    ISP  received  or  participated  in  the  reception  of  the  following  guests  and  delegations.17    17  April:  Prof.  Pamela  Mbabazi,  Deputy  Vice-­‐Chancellor  of  Mbarara  University  of  Science  and  Technology  (MUST),  visited  ISP  to  discuss  current  and  future  collaboration.    2-­‐23  October:  Ms  Janet  Mwania  visited  Uppsala  University  for  discussing  the  implementation  of  a  Master  programme  in  renewable  Energy  at  INST,  Univ.  Nairobi.  Kenya.   (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    26  November:  Prof.  Salah  Arafa,  American  University  in  Cairo,  Egypt,  a  former  fellow  of  the  International  Seminar  in  Physics  (1967-­‐1968)  visited  ISP.      

                                                                                                                         16  These  students  were  supported  from  the  host  group’s  local  ISP  funds  instead  of  by  an  MFS  stipend.  17  See  also  http://www.isp.uu.se/visits/  

 23  

5.2   Achieved  Outcomes  and  Outputs  

In  2013,  ISP  supported  35  research  groups  and  19  scientific  networks,  spending  in  total  24,197  kSEK  (Table  7).  There  were  294  PhD  students  engaged,  and  344  postgraduate  students  training  for  MSc,  MPhil  or  Licentiate’s  degrees,  benefiting  directly  or  indirectly  from  ISP  support.  About  half  of  the  PhD  students,  and  6%  of  the  Master  students,  we’re  trained  in  sandwich  programs.  On  average,  23%  of  the  students  were  female.  The  research  groups  and  networks  graduated  76  MScs  and  35  PhDs,  disseminated  540  scientific  contributions  as  publications  or  at  conferences,  and  arranged  67  meetings  attended  by  totally  at  least  4,000  participants.    Table  7.  Expenditures  and  number  of  ISP  supported  activities  2013,  students  registered,  and  outcome  in  terms  of  student  graduations  and  dissemination  (L.Am.  =  Latin  America)     Africa   Asia   L.Am.   Total  Expenditures  by  research  groups  and  networks  (kSEK)*  -­‐  Shorter  term  training,  visits  and  travels  -­‐  Development  of  technical  resources;  local  events.  -­‐  Regional  activities  and  training  -­‐  Longer-­‐term,  mostly  “Sandwich”  type  training  Total  expenditures    

 1,809  6,595  3,487  4,886  

16,778  

 

614  1,572  513  913  

3,612  

 0  0  

300  3,507  3,807  

 

2,424  8,167  4,300  9,307  

24,197  

Number  of  Supported  Activities  Research  Groups  in  Swedish  Focus  Countries  Research  Groups  in  Non-­‐Focus  Countries  Regional  Scientific  Networks  Total  number  of  activities  

 22  4  14  40  

 7  2  3  12  

 0  0  2  2  

 29  6  19  54  

Students    Students  registered  for  PhD  (sandwich  type)  Students  registered  for  PhD  (local)  Percentage  of  PhD  students  that  are  female      Students  registered  for  MSc  or  MPhil  (sandwich  type)  Students  registered  for  MSc  or  MPhil  (local)  Percentage  of  MSc  students  that  are  female      Total  number  of  postgraduate  students  Percentage  of  postgraduate  students  that  are  female      PhD  graduations  (“sandwich”/local)  Lic.,  MSc  and  MPhil  graduations  (“sandwich”/local)  

 119  135  18    9  

264  26    

527  22    

15/15  1/62  

 10  30  28    8  68  20    

116  22    

0/    4  0/12  

 12  0  33    4  1  60    

17  41    

1/0  1/0  

 141  165  20    

21  333  25    

660  23    

16/19  2/74  

Dissemination    Publications  in  International  J.  (with  TR  impact  factors)**  Publications  in  International  Journals  (“TR  unlisted”)**  Books,  Chapters,  Popular  Publ.,  Technical  Reports,  etc.      International  Conference  Contributions  Regional  Conference  Contributions  National  Conference  Contributions    Total  dissemination    Conferences/Workshops/Courses  arranged    Number  of  participants  

 66  114  18    

85  103  26    

412    

44  ≈2,000  

 11  20  3    

29  10  30    

103    

19  ≈1,700  

 6  0  0    4  6  9    

25    4  

≈300  

 83  134  21    

118  119  65    

540    

67  ≈4,000  

*Only  Sida-­‐funded  expenditures  are  listed.  Explanation  to  expenditure  categories  is  given  in  Section  5.2.1  **See  Section  5.4.      

 24  

5.2.1     Expenditures  by  Supported  Activities    Research  groups  (Table  8)  accounted  for  51%  and  scientific  networks  (Table  9)  for  49%  of  the  total  Sida-­‐funded  expenditures,  using  88%  of  financial  resources  made  available  (including  balances  carried  over  from  2012).  The  balances  made  up  11%  of  available  funding.      Table  8.  Research  groups,  start  of  support,  allocations  and  expenditures  2013  (Sida-­‐financed  only).  New  groups  having  their  first  year  of  support  in  2013  are  highlighted.  (BCF  –  balance  carried  forward;  RG  –  research  group)  Region Country ISP Code Start BCF Allocation Expenditure Africa Burkina Faso IPICS BUF:01 2008 0 220 220 Africa Burkina Faso IPICS BUF:02 2008 0 450 426 Africa Ethiopia IPICS ETH:01 2002 500 900 1299 Africa Ethiopia IPICS ETH:02 2013 0 400 77 Africa Ethiopia IPICS ETH:04 2013 0 500 279 Africa Kenya IPICS KEN:01 2011 170 330 146 Africa Kenya IPICS KEN:02 2011 0 450 450 Africa Mali IPICS MAL:01 2002 100 324 465 Africa Zambia IPICS ZAM:01 2011 0 350 0 Africa Zimbabwe IPICS ZIM:AiBST 2008 0 400 400 Africa Zimbabwe IPICS ZIM:01 2006 0 298 330 Africa Zimbabwe IPICS ZIM:02 1999 100 400 478 Africa IPICS RG, Total 870 5,022 4,570 Africa Ethiopia IPMS ETH:01 2005 74 1,065 492 Africa IPMS RG, Total 74 1,065 492 Africa Burkina Faso IPPS BUF:01 2013 0 450 501 Africa Ethiopia IPPS ETH:01 1990 0 497 298 Africa Ethiopia IPPS ETH:02 2005 150 200 295 Africa Kenya IPPS KEN:01/2 1991 173 870 986 Africa Kenya IPPS KEN:02 1998 150 556 359 Africa Kenya IPPS KEN:03 1998 0 480 141 Africa Kenya IPPS KEN:04 2005 301 595 607 Africa Kenya IPPS KEN:05 2010 150 581 175 Africa Mali IPPS MAL:01 2011 0 400 148 Africa Uganda IPPS UGA:01/2 1989 62 125 14 Africa Uganda IPPS UGA:02 2013 0 400 327 Africa Zambia IPPS ZAM:01 1988 0 380 250 Africa Zimbabwe IPPS ZIM:01 2013 0 350 264 Africa IPPS RG, Total 986 5,884 4,365 Asia Bangladesh IPICS BAN:04 2003 0 435 397 Asia Bangladesh IPICS BAN:05 2013 0 155 155 Asia Cambodia IPICS CAB:01 2010 120 417 529 Asia Laos IPICS LAO:01* 2005 Asia IPICS RG; Total 120 1,007 1,081 Asia Cambodia IPMS CAB:01 2010 15 500 34 Asia IPMS RG, Total 15 500 34 Asia Bangladesh IPPS BAN:02 1980 45 855 609 Asia Bangladesh IPPS BAN:04 2011 45 500 629 Asia Cambodia IPPS CAM:01 2007 0 650 518 Asia Laos IPPS LAO:01* 2005 0 150 153 Asia IPPS RG, Total 90 2,155 1,909 Grand Total, RG 2,155 15,633 12,451 *  IPICS  LAO:01  was  fully,  and  IPPS  LAO:01  additionally,  supported  by  SU  funding  (155  and  100  kSEK,  respectively).  

 25  

Table  9.  Networks,  start  of  support,  allocations  and  expenditures  2013  (Sida-­‐financed  only).  (BCF  –  balance  carried  forward;  NW  –  scientific  network)  Region ISP Code Country Start BCF Allocation Expenditure Africa IPICS ALNAP Ethiopia 1996 0 250 266 Africa IPICS ANCAP Tanzania 2001 0 260 260 Africa IPICS ANEC Burkina Faso 2013 0 130 130 Africa IPICS NABSA Botswana 1995 0 500 263 Africa IPICS NAPRECA Kenya 1988 0 320 320 Africa IPICS RABiotech Burkina Faso 2008 0 650 650 Africa IPICS RAFPE Burkina Faso 2013 0 300 300 Africa IPICS SEANAC Botswana 2005 0 350 350 Africa IPICS NW, Total 0 2,760 2,539 Africa IPMS BURK:01 Burkina Faso 2003 187 1,100 415 Africa IPMS EAUMP Uganda 2002 0 2,724 2,646 Africa IPMS NW, Total 187 3,824 3,061 Africa IPPS AFSIN Ivory Coast 2011 0 570 575 Africa IPPS ESARSWG Zimbabwe 1997 410 350 560 Africa IPPS LAM Senegal 1996 188 0 188 Africa IPPS MSSEESA Zambia 2009 120 300 428 Africa IPPS NW, Total 718 1,220 1,751 Asia IPICS ANFEC Laos 2013 0 200 73 Asia IPICS ANRAP Bangladesh 1994 0 230 230 Asia IPICS NITUB Bangladesh 1995 0 285 285 Asia IPICS NW; Total 0 715 588 Lat.Am. IPICS LANBIO Chile 1986 0 300 300 Lat.Am. IPICS NW, Total 0 300 300 Lat.Am. IPPS NADMICA Guatemala 2012 N/A N/A 3,507 Lat.Am. IPPS NW, Total N/A N/A 3,507 Grand Total, NW 905 8,819 11,746  In  all,  the  supported  activities  in  Africa  accounted  for  68%  of  the  expenditures,  those  in  Asia  for  16%,  and  those  in  Latin  America  for  17%.  The  research  groups  in  Africa  accounted  for  74%,  and  those  in  Asia  for  26%  of  the  total  research  group  expenditures  (Figure  1).  The  scientific  networks  in  Africa  accounted  for  62%,  those  in  Asia  for  5%  and  those  in  Latin  America  for  33%  of  the  total  network  expenditures  (Figure  2).  The  increased  network  expenditures  in  the  Latin  American  region  (compared  to  previous  years  is  due  to  the  adoption  of  the  new  network  IPPS  NADMICA.    The  expenditures  could  be  attributed  to  four  different  kinds  of  categories  of  activities:    • Exchange:  Costs  for  shorter-­‐term  visitors  (sent  or  received),  participation  in  and  

contribution  in  the  arrangement  of  conferences  and  workshops  • Development:  Costs  for  purchase  of  equipment,  consumables,  spare  parts,  literature  and  

other  items  used  locally,  maintainence  costs,  publication  costs,  and  costs  for  fieldwork  and  for  arranging  local  training,  courses,  workshops  and  conferences.  

• Regional:  Costs  for  regional  activities  within  networks,  and  between  research  groups,  mainly  training,  arranging  workshops/summer  schools,  and  use  of  advanced  equipment.  

• Training:  Costs  for  longer-­‐term  training  outside  the  region,  mostly  sandwich  programs.    The  largest  category  of  expenditures  of  research  groups  was  on  development  costs  (Figure  3),  while  networks  spent  most  on  training  (Figure  4).    

 26  

       Figure  1.  Distribution  of  expenditures     Figure  2.  Distribution  of  expenditures  (%)  of  research  groups  2013,  by  region.     (%)  of  scientific  networks  2013,  by  region.  (Sida-­‐financed  only)         (Sida-­‐financed  only)    Research  groups  spent  54%  of  their  financial  resources  on  development  (Figure  3),  while  networks  spent  only  12%  (Figure  4).  Development  costs  made  up  73%  of  the  expenditures  of  chemistry  groups,  and  38%  and  29%  in  physics  and  mathematics  groups,  respectively  (Figure  5).  Among  networks,  only  those  in  chemistry  spent  substantial  amounts  on  development  costs,  27%  of  funds,  while  both  mathematics  and  physics  networks  spent  less  than  10%  (Figure  6).      The  share  of  training  expenditures  among  networks  was  highest  in  mathematics  (76%)  and  in  physics  (67%),  while  chemistry  networks  used  no  funds  on  training  (Figure  4).  Among  research  groups,  those  in  mathematics  used  71%  of  their  expenditures  on  training,  those  in  physics  39%  and  those  in  chemistry  12%  (Figure  3).    Among  research  groups  16%  of  expenditures  were  on  exchange  and  2%  on  regional  activities  (Figure  3),  while  networks  spent  34%  of  regional  activities  and  4%  on  exchange  (Figure  4).    

   Figure  3.  Distribution  of  expenditures    (%)   Figure  4.  Distribution  of  expenditures  (%)  of  research  groups  2013,  by  activity.  (Sida-­‐   of  networks  2013,  by  activity.  (Sida-­‐financed    financed  only)           only)    The  expenditures  on  exchange  were  most  pronounced  in  physics  (18%)  and  chemistry  (16%)  research  groups,  while  mathematics  research  groups  spent  nothing  on  this  (Figure  5).  Physics  networks  used  6%  of  expenditures  on  exchange,  while  chemistry  networks  used  3%  and  mathematics  networks  1%  (Figure  6).    

Chemistry  networks  used  most  of  their  expenditures  on  regional  activities  (70%),  while  physics  networks  used  23%  and  those  in  mathematics  14%  (Figure  6).  Chemistry  and  mathematics  research  groups  did  not  spend  any  funds  on  regional  activities,  while  physics  research  groups  spent  5%  (Figure  5).  

In  conclusion,  chemistry  research  groups  were  more  development  oriented  than  mathematics  and  physics  groups,  which  were  instead  more  training  oriented,  their  second  largest  expenditures  share  being  development  (Figure  5).  Chemistry  networks,  on  the  other  hand,  were  

Africa,  74%  

Asia,  26%  

Africa,  62%  Asia,  5%  

Lat.Am.,  33%  

Exchange,  16%  Develop.,  54%  Regional,  2%  Training,  28%  

Exchange,  4%  Develop.,  12%  Regional,  34%  Training,  50%  

 27  

mostly  oriented  towards  regional  activitities,  while  mathematics  and  physics  networks  were  mostly  oriented  towards  training,  regional  activities  being  the  second  largest  share  of  expenditures.  Chemistry  networks  spend  their  second  largest  share  on  development.    

 Figure  5.  Distribution  of  expenditures  (kSEK)  by  research  groups  on  categories  of  activities  2013,  per  subject  program.  (Sida-­‐financed  only)    

 Figure  6.  Distribution  of  expenditures  (kSEK)  by  scientific  networks  on  categories  of  activities  2013,  per  subject  program.  (Sida-­‐financed  only)  

Research  groups’  Sida-­‐financed  expenditures  were  to  87%  in  Swedish  focus  countries  (see  Section  3.4.2,  The  New  Development  Policy  2007),  and  53%  were  in  Swedish  focus  countries  not  having  a  Sida  bilateral  agreement  on  research  development  cooperation  (Table  10).  Research  groups  in  non-­‐focus  countries  (Laos  and  Zimbabwe)  accounted  for  13%  of  research  group  expenditures.  In  addition,  research  groups  in  Laos  had  expenditures  financed  by  Stockholm  University  funding  (Table  8).  Mathematics  research  groups  were  in  focus  contries  only,  with  most  of  expenditures  (94%)  in  Ethiopia  (Table  8,  Table  10,  Figure  7).  Expenditures  of  physics  research  groups  were  to  93%  in  focus  countries,  and  70%  in  countries  without  Sida  support  to  research  development.  Expenditures  of  chemistry  groups  were  to  79%  in  focus  countries,  about  half  of  that  in  countries  without  Sida  support  to  researcg  development.  

0  

1000  

2000  

3000  

4000  

5000  

6000  

7000  

IPICS   IPMS   IPPS  

Training  

Regional  

Develop.  

Exchange  

0  

1000  

2000  

3000  

4000  

5000  

6000  

IPICS   IPMS   IPPS  

Training  

Regional  

Develop.  

Exchange  

 28  

Table  10.  Distribution  of  Research  Group  expenditures  (kSEK  and  %)  in  2013,  to  Swedish  focus  countries  (FC)  with  or  without  (w/o)  Sida  (current  or  earlier)  bilateral  research  development  programs  (Bil.  Prg.),  and  to  other  countries,  for  IPICS,  IPMS  and  IPPS.  (Sida-­‐financed  only)  Country  Category   IPICS   IPMS   IPPS   Total     kSEK   %   kSEK   %   kSEK   %   kSEK   %  FC  with  Sida  Bil.  Prg.   2,301   41   492   94   1,435   23   4,228   34  FC,  w/o  Sida  Bil.  Prg.   2,142   38   34   6   4,422   70   6,598   53  Other  Countries   1,208   21   0   0   417   7   1,625   13  TOTAL     5,651   100   526   100   6,274   100   12,451   100    

 Figure  7.  Distribution  of  Research  Group  expenditures  (%)  in  2013,  in  Swedish  focus  countries  (FC)  with  or  without  (w/o)  Sida  (current  or  earlier)  bilateral  research  development  programs  (Sida  Bilat.),  and  in  other  countries,  for  IPICS,  IPMS  and  IPPS.  (Sida-­‐financed  only)    5.2.2     Students  and  Staff    In  2013,  totally  660  postgraduate  students  were  reported  to  be  active  in  research  groups  and  networks,  benefitting  directly  or  indirectly  from  ISP  support  (Table  7).  Female  students  made  up  23%  of  all  reported  students  and  22%  of  those  in  Africa  and  Asia.  In  Latin  America,  41%  of  the  few  participating  students  were  female.    There  were  306  PhD  students  (20%  of  which  female)  active  in  ISP-­‐supported  research  groups  and  scientific  networks  (Table  7).  Out  of  these,  46%  were  training  on  a  “sandwich”  basis.  During  the  year  35  PhD  students  graduated.  Of  these,  16  were  on  sandwich  programs  (3  of  them  female),  and  19  were  on  local  programs  (4  of  them  female).  In  total,  20%  of  the  graduated  PhD  students  were  female  (details  in  Section  5.5).      The  number  of  students  on  Master’s  level  was  354  (25%  of  which  were  female),  and  in  all  only  6%  on  a  “sandwich”  basis  (Table  7).  During  the  year  76  Master’s  students  graduated,  of  which  17%  were  female  (details  in  Section  5.5).    The  gender  proportions  of  students  were  generally  higher  in  the  chemistry  program,  than  in  the  mathematics  and  physics  programs  (Table  11),  although  among  Master  students  in  Asia  there  was  a  slightly  higher  proportion  of  females  in  the  physics  than  in  the  chemistry  groups.  In  chemistry  and  mathematics  research  groups  and  networks  the  proportions  of  female  PhD  students  were  higher  in  Asia  than  in  Africa,  while  the  opposite  was  the  case  in  the  physics  program.  Differences  in  the  proportion  of  female  master  students  in  Africa  and  Asia  were  less  

0  

1000  

2000  

3000  

4000  

5000  

6000  

7000  

IPICS   IPMS   IPPS  

FC  with  Sida  Bilat.  

FC  w/o  Sida  Bilat.  

Other  Countries  

 29  

pronounced,  but  in  both  regions  it  was  about  four  times  higher  in  the  chemistry  and  physics  programs  (23-­‐32%)  than  in  the  mathematics  program  (7-­‐8%).    Table  11.  Proportion  of  female  students  (%)  2013  of  all  postgraduate  students  in  activities  supported  by  IPICS,  IPMS  and  IPPS,  by  region  Students  and  region   IPICS   IPMS   IPPS   Total  PhD  students     Africa   39   5   16   18  PhD  students     Asia   67   20      9   28  PhD  students     Latin  America   0   N/A   36   33  Master  students   Africa   32   8   23   26  Master  students   Asia   27   7   29   20  Master  students   Latin  America   60   N/A   N/A   60    The  proportions  of  female  staff  engaged  in  research  groups  and  scientific  networks  were  on  average  16%  in  African  and  23%  in  Asian  activities  (Table  12).  In  all  5%  of  group  leaders  and  network  coordinators  of  African  activities  were  female,  and  23%  of  those  in  the  Asian  region.    Table  12.  Proportion  of  female  research  group  leaders  and  scientific  network  coordinators  (Leader),  and  staff  members,  in  activities  supported  by  IPICS,  IPMS  and  IPPS,  and  in  all  activities  (Total),  in  Africa  and  Asia  2013  (%)  Region   IPICS  

Leader/Staff  IPMS  

Leader/Staff  IPPS  

Leader/Staff  Total  

Leader/Staff  Africa   10   24   0   14   0   11   5   16  Asia   43   34   0   0   12   20   20   23    ISP  is  actively  working  for  a  more  equal  proportion  of  female  and  male  scientists  and  students,  but  there  have  been  few  improvements  over  the  latest  decades.  This  is  addressed  in  more  detail  in  ISP’s  Strategic  Plan  2013-­‐2017.1  To  promote  gender  equality,  there  will  be  increased  focus  on  gender  equality  issues.  According  to  the  plan,  a  working  group  with  expertise  also  from  social  sciences  will  be  set  up  to  elaborate  a  comprehensive  gender  strategy.  In  the  forms  used  to  collect  yearly  activity  reports  from  research  groups  and  network,  questions  have  already  been  introduced  about  measures  planned  or  carried  out  to  increase  gender  equality  among  staff  and  students.  The  reporting  will  be  evaluated  in  more  detail  in  connection  with  the  development  of  the  gender  strategy.      5.2.3   Dissemination      In  2013,  62%  of  the  217  publications  in  scientific  journals  (Table  7)  were  in  journals  listed  with  Thomson  Reuter  impact  factors  (see  Section  5.4).  In  addition,  21  publications  were  book  chapters,  etc.  See  Sections  5.4.1  (chemistry),  5.4.2  (mathematics,),  and  5.4.3  (physics).    

Besides  publications,  302  contributions  were  made  to  scientific  conferences,  39%  at  the  international,  39%  at  the  regional,  and  22%  at  the  national  level  (see  Section  6.4.1).  In  addition,  67  scientific  meetings  were  arranged  (see  Section  6.4.2).  

     

 30  

5.3     Outputs  and  Outcomes  that  were  not  achieved    

 This  section  briefly  describes  the  few  challenges  encountered,  gives  a  short  account  for  influencing  factors  and  issues,  as  well  as  opportunities  and  lessons  learnt  

5.3.1   Annual  Report  2012    The  publication  of  ISP’s  Annual  Report  2012  was  delayed  to  November  2013.  

The  main  factor  influencing  the  delay  was  the  time-­‐consuming  work  at  ISP  to  put  a  new  Strategy  Plan  in  place.  It  was  completed  in  June  2013.  Other  competing  activities  given  priority  was  to  update  and  complement  the  proposal  to  Sida,  in  particular  during  the  intense  assessmen  period  in  the  later  part  of  the  year.  In  addition,  the  quality  control  of  data  in  the  Annual  Report  took  longer  time  than  expected.  

It  is  important  to  start  the  work  to  draft  the  Annual  Report  as  early  as  possible  in  the  year,  once  the  activity  reports  from  groups  and  networks  start  to  be  received  at  ISP.    

5.3.2   Proposal  to  Sida    The  assessment  of  the  proposal  for  continued  Sida  support  to  ISP,  submitted  on  30  March  2012  to  Sida’s  Unit  for  Research  Cooperation,  was  delayed  to  the  later  part  of  2013,  and  no  decision  was  taken  by  Sida  before  the  end  of  the  year.  

The  delays  in  handling  the  ISP  proposal  to  Sida  were  partly  due  to  circumstantially  determined  priorities  at  Sida’s  Unit  for  Research  Cooperation.  In  September  2013  the  Unit  appointed  a  new  ISP-­‐responsible  officer  and  gave  higher  priority  to  conducting  the  assessment.  However,  circulation  of  staff  at  the  Unit,  and  formal  requirements  related  to  Sida’s  strategy  as  decided  by  the  government,  introduced  additional  delays.  

For  2013,  Sida  took  the  decision  to  support  ISP  essentially  according  to  the  budget  request  in  the  proposal,  which  very  much  facilitated  operating  the  program.  This  also  implied  that  support  to  a  number  of  research  groups  and  scientific  networks  put  “on  hold”  in  2011  and  2012  –  awaiting  a  new  cooperation  agreement  with  Sida  –  could  commence.  

5.3.4   Difficulties  in  finding  PhD-­‐candidates  in  mathematics  in  Cambodia    The  difficulties  to  find  PhD  candidates  in  mathematics  in  Cambodia  impaired  the  development  of  the  support  to  the  Dept.  Mathematics  at  the  Royal  University  of  Phnom  Penh  (RUPP).  

The  difficulties  were  mainly  related  to  the  fact  that  the  best  master  graduates  do  not  necessarily  have  positions  at  RUPP,  and  are  therefore  not  available  for  reqruitment.  

The  possibility  to  strengthen  the  development  of  support  to  the  Dept.  Mathematics  at  RUPP  by  forming  a  regional  network  in  mathematics  in  South  East  Asia,  including  the  RUPP  department,  is  suggested.  

       

 31  

5.4     Publications    

 Totally  242  publications  were  reported  2013  (Table  13),  91%  in  scientific  journals  and  9%  other  publications.  Regarding  articles  in  scientific  journals,  39%  were  in  “high  impact”  journals,  (see  below).  

Table  13.  Program  wise  summary  of  publication  data  for  2013,  per  category  and  program.  The  number  (No)  of  publications  (Publ.)  in  scientific  journals  is  specified  to  those  with  and  without  Thomson  Reuters  (TR)  impact  factors,  and  the  proportions  (%)  between  these  are  indicated.  Publication  category   IPICS  

No  /  %  IPMS  No  /  %  

IPPS  No  /  %  

       Total      No  /  %  

 Publ.  in  Scientific  Journals  (with  TR  Impact  Factors)  Publ.  in  Scientific  Journals  (“TR  unlisted”)  Books,  Chapters,  Popular  Publ.,  Techn.  Reports,  etc.      Total  number  of  publications  

 41  40  11    

92  

 51  49  

 15  60  7    

82  

 20  80    

 27  34  3    

64  

 44  56  

 83  134  21    

238  

 39  61  

 In  Sections  5.4.1,  5.4.2  and  5.4.3,  publications  are  detailed  for  each  program,  chemistry,  mathematics  and  physics,  and  summarized  in  Tables  14,  15  and  16.  The  bibliographic  data  given  is  obtained  directly  from  the  reporting  of  the  supported  activities,  with  only  minor  editing.  The  code  of  the  ISP-­‐supported  activity  reporting  the  publication  is  given  after  each  entry.    

The  publications  are  sorted  by  scientific  journal,  and  where  available  the  Thomson  Reuters  (TR)  Impact  Factor  (IF)  2012  is  given  (with  the  5-­‐year  Impact  Factor  within  brackets).18  Journals  listed  with  TR  IF  are  here  considered  to  be  “high  quality”.  In  cases  where  the  Digital  Object  Identifier  (DOI)  code  is  given,  information  can  be  accessed  by  adding  the  code  to  http://dx.doi.org/  in  a  web  browser.  

5.4.1   Chemistry    Table  14.  Summary  by  region  of  number  of  Chemistry  publications  (L.Am.  =  Latin  America)  Publication  category   Africa   Asia   L.Am.   Total    Publications  in  Scientific  Journals  (with  TR  Impact  Factors)  Publications  in  Scientific  Journals  (“TR  unlisted”)  Books,  Chapters,  Popular  Publ.,  Technical  Reports,  etc.      Total  number  of  publications  

 41  32  9    

82  

 0  8  2    

10  

 0  0  0    0  

 41  40  11    

92  

 Publications  in  Scientific  Journals    

Advances  in  Analytical  Chemistry  Kennedy  Olale,  Ramni  Jamnadass,  Shepherd  Keith,  Ermias  Betemariam,  Shem  Kuyah,  Andrew  M.  Sila,  Kehlenbeck,  Katja,  Abiy  Yenisew  (2013).  Limitations  to  Use  of  Infrared  Spectroscopy  for  Rapid  Determination  of  Carbon-­‐Nitrogen  and  Wood  Density  for  Tropical  Species.  Adv.  Anal.  Chem.,  3(3)21-­‐28.                     (IPICS  KEN:02)      

                                                                                                                         182012  Journal  Citation  Reports®  Thomson  Reuters,  2013,  http://thomsonreuters.com/journal-­‐citation-­‐reports/;  see  also  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_factor    

 32  

African  Journal  of  Biotechnology  Milcah  Dhoro,  Charles  Nhachi  and  Collen  Masimirembwa  (2013).  Technological  and  cost  comparison  of  cytochrome  P450  2B6  (516G>T)  genotyping  methods  in  routine  clinical  practice.  African  J.  Biotech.,  12(19)2706-­‐2710.  DOI:10.5897/AJB2013.12043           (IPICS  AiBST)    African  Journal  of  Pure  and  Applied  Chemistry  Mahugija,  J.A.M.  (2013).  Status  and  distributions  of  pesticides  buried  at  five  sites  in  Arusha  and  Mbeya  regions,  Tanz.  Afr.  J.  Pure  Appl.  Chem.,  7(12)382-­‐393.         (IPICS  ANCAP)  DOI:  10.5897/AJPAC2013.0531    Ambio                 2.295  (3.248)  Stadlinger  N.,  Mmochi  A.  J.  and  Kumblad  L.  (2013).  Weak  governmental  institutions  impair  the  management  of  pesticide  import  and  sales  in  Zanzibar.  Ambio,  42(1)72-­‐82.     (IPICS  ANCAP)    Analytica  Chimica  Acta             4.387(4.344)  Dezzline  A.  Ondigo  and  Zenixole  R.  Tshentu  (2013).  Electrospun  nanofiber  based  colorimetric  probe  for  rapid  detection  of  Fe2+  in  water.  Anal.  Chim.  Acta.,  804:228-­‐234.  DOI:  10.1016/j.aca.2013.09.051.                       (IPICS  SEANAC)          Analytical  and  Bioanalytical  Chemistry         3.659  (3.756)  Jobst,  K.J.,  Shen,  L.,  Reiner,  E.J.,  Taguchi,  V.Y.,  Helm,  A.P.,  McCrindle,  R.  and  Backus,  S.  (2013).  The  use  of  mass  defects  plots  for  the  identification  of  halogenated  contaminants  in  the  environment.  Anal.  Bioanal.  Chem.,  405:3289-­‐3297.  DOI:10.107/s00216.013.6735.2         (IPICS  ANCAP)    Analytical  Methods             1.855  (1.854)  Akinsehinwa  Akinlua,  Nelson  Torto  and  Robert  I.  McCrindle  (2013).  A  new  approach  of  sample  preparation  for  determination  of  trace  metals  in  petroleum  source  rocks.  Anal.  Methods,  5:4929-­‐4934.  DOI:10.1039/C3AY40278A               (IPICS  SEANAC)    BioMed  Central  Complementary  and  Alternative  Medicine  Trizah  K.  Milugo,  Leonidah  K.  Omosa,  James  O.  Ochanda,  Bethwell  O.  Owuor,  Fred  A.  Wamunyokoli,  Julius  O.  Oyugi  and  Joel  W.  Ochieng  (2013).  Antagonistic  effect  of  alkaloids  and  saponins  on  bioactivity  in  the  quinine  tree  (Rauvolfia  caffra  sond.):  further  evidence  to  support  biotechnology  in  traditional  medicinal  plants.  BioMed  Centr.  Compl.  Alt.  Med.,  13:285.  DOI:  10.1186/1472-­‐6882-­‐13-­‐285   (IPICS  KEN:02)    BMC  Pediatrics               1.982  I.J.O  Bonkoungou,  K.  Haukka,  M.  Österblad,  A.J.  Hakanen,  A.S.  Traoré,  N.  Barro  and  A.  Siitonen  (2013).  Bacterial  and  viral  etiology  of  childhood  diarrhea  in  Ouagadougou,  Burkina  Faso.  BMC  Pediatrics,  13:36(6  pp.).  DOI:  10.1186/1471-­‐2431-­‐13-­‐36             (IPICS  RABiotech)    British  Journal  of  Pharmaceutical  Research  A.  Parvin,  Md.M.  Alam,  Md.  A.  Haque,  A.Bhowmik,  L.Ali  and  B.  Rokeya  (2013).  Study  of  the  Hypoglycemic  Effect  of  Tamarindus  indica  Linn.  Seeds  on  Non-­‐Diabetic  and  Diabetic  Model  Rats.  Br.  J.  Pharm.  Res.,  3(4)1094-­‐1105.                   (IPICS  ANRAP)    Bulletin  of  Cambodian  Chemical  Society      Neau  C.  and  SO  V.  (2013).  Determination  of  Mercury  in  13  species  of  fish  in  Tonle  Sap  River  (Kampong  Chhnang)  and  7  species  of  farmed  fish.  Bull.  Camb.  Chem.  Soc.,  4(1).       (IPICS  CAB:01)    You  A.  and  Cheng  K.  (2013).  Determination  of  iron  in  fish  from  four  villages  at  Kampong  Chhnang  Province,  Kandal  market  and  farmed  fish  in  Phnom  Penh.  Bull.  Camb.  Chem.  Soc.,  4(1).                         (IPICS  CAB:01)    Tith  S.  and  Chey  T.  (2013).  Qualitative  and  Quantitative  Study  of  Cyanide  in  Bamboo  shoot  (Bamboosa  multiplex)  in  Kandal  and  Kampong  Cham  provinces,  Cambodia.  Bull.  Camb.  Chem.  Soc.,  4(1).                         (IPICS  CAB:01)    

 33  

Heng  S.  and  Chunn  T.  (2013).  Identification  and  quantification  some  of  the  main  volatile  compounds  in  rice  spirit  at  Svay  Chrum  (Svay  Rieng)  and  some  markets  in  Phnom  Penh.  Bull.  Camb.  Chem.  Soc.,  4(1).                     (IPICS  CAB:01)    Thin  R.  and  Long  S.  (2013).  Determination  of  Mercury  in  Marine  Fishes.  Bull.  Camb.  Chem.  Soc.,  4(1).                       (IPICS  CAB:01)    Bulletin  of  the  Chemical  Society  of  Ethiopia       0.417  (0.452)      J.C.W.  Ouedraogo,  I.  Tapsoba,  B.  Guel,  F.S.  Sib  &  Y.L.Bonzi/Coulibaly  (2013).  Cyclic  voltammetry  studies  and  mechanistic  investigation  of  styrylpyrylium  perchlorates.  Bull.  Chem.  Soc.  Ethiop.,  27(1)117-­‐124.  DOI:  10.4314/bcse.v27i1.12               (IPICS  BUF:01)    Hailemariam  Kassa,  Alemnew  Geto  and  Shimelis  Admassie  (2013).  Voltammetric  Determination  of  Nicotine  in  Cigarette  Tobacco  at  Electrochemically  Activated  Glassy  Carbon  Electrode.  Bull.  Chem.  Soc.  Ethiop.,  27(3)321-­‐328.  DOI:  10.4314/bcse.v27i3.1           (IPICS  ETH:01)    M.  Atlabachew,  Bhagnan  Singh  Chandravanshi,  Mesfin  Redi,  B  O.  Pule,  S  Chigome  Nelson  Torto  (2013).  Evaluation  of  the  effect  of  various  drying  techniques  on  the  composition  of  the  physical  composition  of  the  psychoactive  phenylamino  alkaloids  of  Khat  (Catha  Edulis  Forski)  Chewing  leaves;  Bull.  Chem.  Soc.  Ethiop.,  27(3):347-­‐358.  DOI:  10.4314/bcse.v27i3.3         (IPICS  SEANAC)    Chemical  Communications           6.378  (6.226)  Dongfeng  Dang,  Weichao  Chen,  Renqiang  Yang,  Weiguo  Zhu,  Wendimagegn  Mammo  and  Ergang  Wang  (2013).  Fluorine  Substitution  Enhanced  Photovoltaic  Performance  of  a  D-­‐A1-­‐D-­‐A2  Copolymer,  Chem.  Commun.  49:9335-­‐933.  DOI:  10.1039/C3CC44931A           (IPICS  ETH:01)      Chemistry  of  Natural  Compounds         0.599  (0.745)  Tchoukoua,  Abdou;  Sandjo,  Louis  Pergaud;  Keumedjio,  Felix;  Ngadjui,  Bonaventure  Tchaleu;  Kirsch,  Gilbert.  (2013).  Triumfettamide  B,  a  New  Ceramide  from  the  Twigs  of  Triumfetta  rhomboidea.  Chem.  Nat.  Comp.,  49:  811-­‐814                 (IPICS  NABSA)    Chemosphere               3.137  (3.634)  Ssebugere,  P.,  Kiremire,  B.T.,  Henkelmann,  B.  Bernhöft,  S.  Kasozi,  G.  N.  Wasswa,  J.  Schramm,  K.  (2013).  PCDD/Fs  and  dioxin-­‐like  PCBs  in  fish  species  from  Lake  Victoria,  East  Africa.  Chemosphere,  92:317-­‐321.  DOI:  10.1016/j.chemosphere.2013.03.033             (IPICS  ANCAP)    Gebremichael,  S.,  Birhanu,  T.  and  Tessema,  D.A.  (2013).  Analysis  of  organochlorine  pesticide  residues  in  human  and  cow’s  milk  in  the  towns  of  Asendabo,  Serbo  and  Jimma  in  South-­‐Western  Ethiopia.  Chemosphere,  90(5)1652-­‐1657.  DOI:  10.1016/j.chemosphere.2012.09.008     (IPICS  ANCAP)    ChemSusChem               7.475  (7.951)  Berhanu  W.  Zewde,  Shimelis  Admassie,  Jutta  Zimmermann,  Christian  Schulze  Isfort,  Bruno  Scrosati  and  Jusef  Hassoun  (2013).  Enhanced  performances  of  lithium  polymer  battery  using  polyethylene  oxide-­‐based  electrolyte  added  by  silane  treated,  Al2O3  ceramic  filler.  ChemSusChem,  6:1400-­‐1405.  DOI:  10.1002/cssc.201300296               (IPICS  ETH:01)    Chromatographia             1.437  (1.283)  M.  Atlabachew,  Nelson  Torto,  Bhagnan  Singh  Chandravanshi  and  Mesfin  Red,  (2013).  Matrix  Solid-­‐Phase  Dispersion  for  the  HPLC-­‐DAD  Determination  of  Psychoactive  Phenylpropylamino  Alkaloids  from  Khat  (Catha  Edulis  Forsk)  Chewing  Leaves.  Chromatographia,  76:401-­‐408     (IPICS  SEANAC)    CPT  Pharmacometrics  &  Systems  Pharmacology  C.  Masimirembwa  and  J.A.  Hasler  (2013).  Pharmacogenetics  in  Africa,  an  Opportunity  for  Appropriate  Drug  Dosage  Regimens:  on  the  Road  to  Personalized  Healthcare.  CPT  Pharmacometrics  Syst.  Pharmacol.  2,  e45(4  pp.).  DOI:10.1038/psp.2013.17             (IPICS  AiBST)        

 34  

Current  Research  in  Microbiology  and  Biotechnology  E.  Taale,  A.  Savadogo,  C.  Zongo,  A.J.  Ilboudo  and  A.S.  Traoré  (2013).  Bioactive  molecules  from  bacteria  strains:  case  of  bacteriocins  producing  bacteria  isolated  from  foods.  Curr.  Res.  Microbiol.  Biotechnol.,  1(3)80-­‐88.                   (IPICS  RABiotech)    Electrochimica  Acta             3.777  (4.088)  W.  Geremedhin,  M.  Amare  (2013).  Electrochemically  pretreated  glassy  carbon  electrode  for  electrochemical  detection  of  fenitrothion  in  tap  water  and  human  urine.  Electrochimica  Acta,  87:749–755.                         (IPICS  ETH:01)    Food  and  Nutrition  Sciences  B.  Kayalto,  C.  Zongo,  R.W.  Compaore,  A.  Savadogo,  B.O.  Brahim,  A.S.  Traore,  (2013).  Study  of  the  Nutritional  Value  and  Hygienic  Quality  of  Local  Infant  Flours  from  Chad,  with  the  Aim  of  Their  Use  for  Improved  Infant  Flours  Preparation.  Food  Nutr.  Sci.,  4:59-­‐68.       (IPICS  RABiotech)    U.  Zongo,  S.L.  Zoungrana,  A.  Savadogo,  A.S.  Traoré  (2013).  Nutritional  and  clinical  rehabilitation  of  severely  malnourished  children  with  Moringa  oleifera  Lam.  leaf  powder  in  Ouagadougou  (Burkina  Faso).  Food  Nutr.  Sci.,  4:991-­‐997.               (IPICS  RABiotech)    Industrial  Crops  and  Products           2.468  (2.829)        Wennd  Kouni  Igor  Ouedraogo;  Julien  De  Winter;  Pascal  Gerbaux;  Yvonne  L  Bonzi-­‐Coulibaly  (2013).  Volatility  profiles  of  monoterpenes  loaded  onto  cellulosic-­‐based  materials.  Ind.  Crop  Prod.,  51:100-­‐106.                     (IPICS  BUF:01)    Inorganic  Chemistry  Communications         2.016  (1.886)  Abebe,  A.,  Admassie,  S.,  Villar-­‐Garcia,  I.J.,  Chebude,  Y.  (2013).  4,4-­‐Bipyridinium  ionic  liquids  exhibiting  excellent  solubility  for  metal  salts:  Potential  solvents  for  electrodeposition.  Inorg.  Chem.  Comm.,  29:210-­‐212.  DOI:10.1016/j.inoche.2012.11.034.             (IPICS  ETH:01)      International  Journal  of  Biological  and  Chemical  Sciences    Bessimbaye,  N.,  Tidjani,  A.,  Gamougame,  K.,  Brahim  B.O.,  Ndoutamia,  G.,  Sangare,  L.,  Barro,  N.  &  Traoré.  A  (2013).  Gastro-­‐entérites  en  milieux  des  réfugiés  au  Tchad.  Int.  J.  Biol.  Chem.  Sci.,  7(2)468-­‐478.                       (IPICS  RABiotech)    International  Journal  of  Pest  Management       0.718  (0.757)  O.  Gnankiné,  L.  Mouton,  A.  Savadogo,  T.  Martin,  A.  Sanon,  R.K.  Dabire,  F.  Vavre,  F.  Fleury  (2013).  Biotype  status  and  resistance  to  neonicotinoids  and  carbosulfan  in  Bemisia  tabaci  (Hemiptera:  Aleyrodidae)  in  Burkina  Faso,  West  Africa.  Int.  J.  Pest  Manag.,  59(2).         (IPICS  RABiotech)    International  Journal  of  Research  in  Chemistry  and  Environment  Njuguna,  D.G.,  Wanyoko,  J.K.,  Kinyanjui,  T.  &  Wachira,  F.N.  (2013).  Polyphenols  and  free  radical  scaveng-­‐ing  properties  of  Kenyan  tea  seed  oil  cake.  Int.  J.  Res.  Chem.Environ.,  3(2):86-­‐92.   (IPICS  ANCAP)    International  Research  Journal  of  Environment  Sciences          Pare  Samuel,  Persson  Ingmar,  Guel  Boubié,  Lundberg  Daniel  (2013).  Trivalent  Chromium  removal  from  Aqueous  solution  using  Raw  Natural  Mixed  Clays  from  BURKINA  FASO.  Int.  Res.  J.  Environ.  Sci.,  2(2)30-­‐37                     (IPICS  BUF:02)    International  Scholarly  Reseach  Notices  Soil  Science  A.A.  Okoya,  A.O.  Ogunfowokan,  O.I.  Asubiojo,  N.  Torto,  (2013).  Organochlorine  Pesticide  Residues  in  Sediments  and  Waters  from  Cocoa  Producing  Areas  of  Ondo  State,  Southwestern  Nigeria.  ISRN  Soil  Sci.,  Vol.  2013,  Art.  ID  131647  (12  pp.)  DOI:  10.1155/2013/131647       (IPICS  SEANAC)                Journal  of  Agricultural  and  Food  Chemistry       2.906  (3.288)  Song,  Y.,  Wang,  F.,  Kengara  F.O.,  Yang,  X.,  Gu,  C.  &  Jiang,  X.  (2013).  Immobilization  of  chlorobenzenes  in  soil  using  wheat  straw  biochar.  J.  Agric.  Food  Chem.,  61(18)4210-­‐7.  (8  pp.)  DOI:  10.1021/jf400412p                       (IPICS  ANCAP)      

 35  

Journal  of  AIDS  &  Clinical  Research      T.  Nemaura,  M.  Dhoro,  C.  Nhachi,  G.  Kadzirange,  P.  Chonzi  and  C.  Masimirembwa  (2013).  Evaluation  of  the  Prevalence,  Progression  and  Severity  of  Common  Adverse  Reactions  (Lipodystrophy,  CNS,  Peripheral  Neuropathy,  and  Hypersensitivity  Reactions)  Associated  with  Anti-­‐Retroviral  Therapy  (ART)  and  Anti-­‐Tuberculosis  Treatment  in  Outpatients  in  Zimbabwe.  J.  AIDS  Clin.  Res.  4(4.4):203.  DOI:  10.4172/2155-­‐6113.1000203                   (IPICS  AiBST)      Journal  of  Applied  Biology  &  Biotechnology  Bessimbaye  N,  Tidjani  A,  Moussa  AM,  Brahim  BO,  Mbanga  D,  Ndoutamia  G,  Sangare  L,  Barro  N,  Traore  AS,  (2013).  Gastroenteritis  with  Eschericha  coli  in  pediatric  hospital  in  N’Djamena-­‐Chad.  J.  Appl.  Biol.  Biotechnol.,  1(02)013-­‐017               (IPICS  RABiotech)    Journal  of  Applied  Pharmaceutical  Science    Rubaiat  Nazneen  Akhand,  Sohel  Ahmed,  Amrita  Bhowmik  and  Begum  Rokeya  (2013).  Sub-­‐chronic  oral  administration  of  the  ethanolic  extracts  of  dried  Terminalia  chebula  mature  fruits  in  streptozotocin  (STZ)-­‐induced  type  2  diabetes  mellitus  (T2DM)  model  of  Long-­‐Evans  (L-­‐E)  rats  improve  glycemic,  lipidemic  and  anti-­‐oxidative  status.  J.  Appl.  Pharm.  Sci.,  3(5)27-­‐32.  DOI:  10.7324/JAPS.2013.3506   (IPICS  ANRAP)      Journal  of  Biologically  Active  Products  from  Nature  Munodawafa,  T.,  Chagonda,  L.S  and  Moyo,  S.R.  (2013).  Antimicrobial  and  phytochemical  screening  of  some  Zimbabwean  medicinal  plants.  J.  Biol.  Active  Prod.  Nat.,  3(5-­‐6)323-­‐330.   (IPICS  ANCAP)    Journal  of  Biosciences             1.759  (2.225)  J.L  Nantchouang  Ouete,  L.P.  Sandjo,  I.K.  Simo,  D.W.F.G  Kapche,  J.C.  Liermann,  T.  Opatz,  B.T.  Ngadjui  (2013).  A  new  flavone  from  the  roots  of  Milicia  excelsa  (Moraceae).  Zeitschrift  für  Naturforschung.  C,  J.  Biosci.,  68(7-­‐8)259-­‐263                   (IPICS  NABSA)    Journal  of  Chemical  Engineering  and  Materials    G.  Kalonga,  G.K.  Chinyama,  O.  Munyati,  M.  Maaza  (2013).  Characterization  and  optimization  of  poly  (3-­‐hexylthiophene-­‐2,  5-­‐diyl)  (P3HT)  and  [6,  6]  phenyl-­‐C61-­‐  butyric  acid  methyl  ester  (PCBM)  blends  for  optical  absorption.  J.  Chem.  Eng.  Mat.,  4(7)93–102.  DOI:10.5897/JCEMS2013.0148   (IPICS  ZAM:01)      Journal  of  Chemistry  B.S.  Batlokwa,  J.  Mokgadi,  R.  Majors,  C.  Turner,  N.  Torto  (2013).  A  Novel  Molecularly  Imprinted  Polymer  for  the  Selective  Removal  of  Chlorophyll  from  Heavily  Pigmented  Green  Plant  Extracts  prior  to  Instrumental  Analysis.  J.  Chem.,  Vol.  2013,  Article  ID  540240.  (4  pp.)  DOI:  10.1155/2013/540240                       (IPICS  SEANAC)      Journal  of  Chromatography  A  Mubiru,  E.  Kshitij  S.,  Papastergiadis,  A.  and  De  Meulenaer,  D.  (2013).  Improved  gas  chromatography-­‐flame  ionization  detector  analytical  method  for  the  analysis  of  epoxy  fatty  acids.  J.  Chrom.  A,  1318:217–225.  DOI:  10.1016/j.chroma.2013.10.025             (IPICS  ANCAP)    Journal  of  Crystal  Growth           1.552  (1.603)  M.  Bougouma,  A.  Batan,  B.  Guel,  T.  Segato,  J.B.Legma,  F.  Reniers,  M.-­‐P.  Delplancke-­‐Ogletree,  C.  Buess-­‐Herman,  T.  Doneux  (2013).  Growth  and  Characterization  of  large,  high  quality  of  MoSe2  single  crystals.  J.  Crystal  Growth,  (363)122-­‐127.  DOI:  10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2012.10.026       (IPICS  BUF:02)    Journal  of  Environmental  Protection  Léon  W.  Nitiema,  Savadogo  Boubacar,  Zongo  Dramane,  Aminata  Kabore,  Poda  Jean  Noël,  Alfred  S.  Traoré  &  Dayéri  Dianou  (2013).  Microbial  quality  of  wastewater  used  in  urban  truck  farming  and  health  risks  issues  in  developing  countries:  Case  study  of  Ouagadougou  in  Burkina  Faso.  J.  Environ.  Prot.,  4:575-­‐584.  DOI:  10.4236/jep.2013.46067               (IPICS  RABiotech)    Savadogo  Boubacar,  Kaboré  Aminata,  Zongo  Dramane,  Poda  Jean  Noel,  Bado  Hortense,  Rosillon  Francis  and  Dayeri  Dianou  (2013).  Problematic  of  drinking  water  access  in  rural  area:  Case  study  of  the  Sourou  valley  in  Burkina  Faso.  J.  Environ.  Prot.,  4:31-­‐50.  DOI:  10.4236/jep.2013.41004   (IPICS  RA  Biotech)    

 36  

Journal  of  Essential  Oil  Bearing  Plants         0.172  (0.283)  Nanyonga,  S.K.,  Opoku,  A.R.,  Lewu,  F.B.  and  Oyedeji,  A.O.  (2013).  The  Chemical  Composition,  Larvicidal  and  Antibacterial  Activities  of  the  Essential  Oil  of  Tarchonanthus  trilobus  var  galpinii.  Journal  of  Essential  Oil  Bearing  Plants,  16(4)524-­‐530.    DOI:  10.1080/0972060X.2013.831572     (IPICS  ALNAP)    Journal  of  Institute  of  Medicine  Bharati  L,  Amatya  S,  Rokeya  B,  Bhoumik  A,  Gharti  KP  (2013).  Study  on  hypoglycemic  effect  of  Berberis  aristata  on  type  2  diabetic  model  rats.  J.  Inst.  Med.,  35(2)58-­‐64       (IPICS  ANRAP)    Journal  of  Natural  Products           3.285  (3.267)  F.N.  Njayou,  E.C.E.  Aboudi,  M.K.  Tandjang,  A.K.  Tchana,  B.T.  Ngadjui,  P.F.  Moundipa  (2013).  Hepatoprotective  and  antioxidant  activities  of  stem  bark  extract  of  Khaya  grandifoliola  (Welw)  CDC  and  Entada  africana  Guill.  et  Perr.  J.  Nat.  Prod.,  6:73-­‐80           (IPICS  NABSA)    Journal  of  Pharmacopuncture  T.E.  Kwape,  P.  Chaturvedi,  M.  Kamau,  R  .R.  T.  Majinda  (2013).  Antioxidant  and  hepatoprotective  activities  of  Ziziphus  mucronata  fruit  extract  againstdimethoate-­‐induced  toxicity.  J.  Pharmaco-­‐punct.,  16:021-­‐029.                     (IPICS  NABSA)    Journal  of  Polymer  Science  K  Awokoya,  BA  Moronkola,  S.  Chigome,  D.  Ondigo  (2013).  Molecularly  Imprinted  Electrospun  Nanofibers  for  Adsorption  of  Nickel-­‐5,10,15,20-­‐Tetraphenylporphine  (NTPP)  in  Organic  media.  J.  Polymer  Sci.,  20(148).  (9  pp.)  DOI:  10.1007/s10965-­‐013-­‐0148-­‐y         (IPICS  SEANAC)    Journal  of  Photochemistry  and  Photobiology  A:  Chemistry  C.M.  Wawirea,  D.  Jouvenot,  F.  Loiseau,  P.  Baudin,  S.  Liatard,  L.  Njenga,  G.N.  Kamau,  M.E.  Casida  (2013).  Density-­‐functional  study  of  luminescence  in  polypyridine  ruthenium  complexes.  J.  Photochem.  Photobiol.  A:  Chem.,  276:  8–15.  DOI:  10.1016/j.jphotochem.2013.10.018       (IPICS  KEN:01)    Journal  of  Separation  Science           2.591  (2.638)  Tolcha,  T.,  Merdassa,  Y.,  Megersa,  N.  (2013).  Low-­‐density  extraction  solvent  based  solvent-­‐terminated  dispersive  liquid–liquid  microextraction  for  quantitative  determination  of  ionizable  pesticides  in  environmental  waters.  J.  Sep.  Sci.,  36(6)1119-­‐1127.         (IPICS  ANCAP)    Journal  of  the  Cameroon  Academy  of  Science  Igor  W.  K.  Ouédraogo,  Carole  Tranchant  and  Yvonne  L.  Bonzi-­‐Coulibaly  (2013).  Evaluation  of  mineral  contents  in  Cleome  gynandra  leaves  and  stalks  from  Burkina  Faso.  J.  Cameroon  Acad.  Sci.,  11(1)43-­‐47.                       (IPICS  BUF:01)    Journal  of  Water  Resource  and  Protection  A.  Kabore,  B.  Savadogo,  F.  Rosillon,  A.S.  Traoré  &  D.  Dianou  (2013).  Effectiveness  of  Moringa  oleifera  defatted  cake  versus  seed  in  the  treatment  of  unsafe  drinking  water:  case  study  of  surface  and  well  waters  in  Burkina  Faso.  J.  Water  Res.  Protec.,  5(11)1076-­‐1086.  DOI:  0.4236/jwarp.2013.511113                         (IPICS  RABiotech)            Journal  of  Water  Sciences  A.  Kabore,  B.  Savadogo,  F.  Rosillon,  A.S.  Traoré  &  D.  Dianou  (2013).  Optimisation  de  l’efficacité  des  graines  de  Moringa  Oleifera  dans  le  traitement  des  eaux  de  consommation  en  Afrique  subsaharienne:  cas  des  eaux  du  Burkina  Faso.  J.  Water  Sci.,  26(3)209-­‐220.     DOI:  10.7202/1018786ar     (IPICS  RABiotech)      Malaysian  Journal  of  Pharmaceutical  Sciences  Mohammad  Mizanur  Rahman,  Begum  Rokeya,  Md  Shahjahan,  Tofail  Ahmed,  Sudhangshu  Kumar  Roy  and  Liaquat  Ali  (2013).  Hypoglycemic  effect  of  Nyctanthes  arbortristis  Linn.  extracts  in  normal  and  streptozotocin  induced  diabetic  rats.  Malaysian  Journal  of  Pharmaceutical  Sciences,  11(1)21-­‐31.                       (IPICS  ANCAP)        

 37  

Materials  and  Structures           1.184  (1.653)  B.  Sorgho,  L.  Zerbo,  I.  Keita,  C.  Dembele,  M.  Plea,  V.  Sol,  M.  Gomina,  P.  Blanchart  (2013).  Strength  and  creep  behavior  of  geomaterials  for  building  with  tannin  addition.  Mater.  Struct.,  47(6)937-­‐946.    DOI  10.1617/s11527-­‐013-­‐0104-­‐7             (IPICS  BUF:02)                         (IPICS  MAL:01)    Medicinal  Chemistry             1.373  (1.362)  Ngameni  B,  Kuete  V,  Ambassa  P,  kamga  J,  Moungang  LM,  Tchoukoua  A,  Roy  R,  Ngadjui  BT,  Tetsuya  M  (2013).  Synthesis  and  evaluation  of  anticancer  activity  of  O-­‐allylchalcone  derivatives.  Med.  Chem.,  3(3)233-­‐237.  DOI:  10.4172/2161-­‐0444.1000144           (IPICS  NABSA)    Molecular  Imprinting  J.  Mokgadi,  S.  Batlokwa,  K.  Mosepele,  V.  Obuseng,  N.  Torto  (2013).  Pressurized  hot  water  extraction  coupled  to  molecularly  imprinted  polymers  for  simultaneous  extraction  and  clean-­‐up  of  pesticides  residues  in  edible  and  medicinal  plants  of  the  Okavango  Delta,  Botswana.  Molec.  Imprint.,1:55–64.  DOI:  10.2478/molim-­‐2013-­‐0003               (IPICS  SEANAC)    Molecules               2.428  (2.679  Endale,  M.,  Ekberg,  Alao,  J.P.,  A.  Akala,  H.M.,  Ndakala,  A.,  Sunnerhagen,  P.,  Erdelyi,  M.,  Yenesew,  A.,  (2013).  Anthraquinones  of  the  roots  of  Pentas  micrantha.  Molecules,  18:311-­‐321.       (IPICS  KEN:02)    Natural  Product  Communications         0.956  (0.913)  Francis  Machumi,  Jacob  O  Midiwo,  Melissa  R.  Jacob,  Shabana  I  Khan,  Babu  L.  Tekwani,  Jin  Zhang,  Larry  Walker,  Ilias  Muhammad  (2013).  Phytochemical,  antimicrobial,  antiplasmodial  investigations  of  Terminalia  brownii.  Nat.  Prod.  Comm.,  8(6):761-­‐764.         (IPICS  KEN:02)    L.O.  Kerubo,  J.O.  Midiwo,  S.  Derese,  M.K.  Langat,  H.M.  Akala,  N.C.  Waters,  M.  Peter  and  M.  Heydenreich  (2013).  Antiplasmodial  activity  of  compounds  from  the  surface  exudates  of  Senecio  roseiflorus.  Nat.  Prod.  Comm.,  8:175-­‐176.                 (IPICS  KEN:02)    Induli,  M.G.,  N.  Abdissa,  H.  Akala,  I.  Wekesa,  R.  Byamukama,  M.  Heydenreich,  S.  Murunga,  E.  Dagne  and  A.  Yenesew  (2013).  Antiplasmodial  Quinones  from  the  Rhizomes  of  Kniphofia  foliosa.  Nat.  Prod.  Comm.,  8:1261-­‐1264.                   (IPICS  ALNAP)                       (IPICS  KEN:02)    Oriental  Pharmacy  and  Experimental  Medicine    SJ  Hossain,  MH  Basar,  B  Rokeya,  KMT  Arif,  MS  Sultana  and  MH  Rahman  (2013).  Evaluation  of  antioxidant,  antidiabetic  and  antibacterial  activities  of  the  fruit  of  Sonneratia  apetala  (Buch.-­‐Ham.).  Orient.  Pharm.  Exp.  Med.,  13(2)95-­‐102.  DOI:  10.1007/s13596-­‐012-­‐0064-­‐4       (IPICS  ANCAP)    Phosphorus,  Sulfur,  Silicon,  and  the  Related  Elements  T.  Singh,  G.  S.  Singh  &  R.  Lakhan  (2013).  Chemoselective  reaction  of  benzoylisothiocyanates  with  hydroxyl  group  of  salicylamide:  A  new  and  convenient  entry  into  2-­‐aryl-­‐4H-­‐benzo[e][1,3]oxazin-­‐4-­‐ones.  P  S  Si  Related  Elements,  188:1442-­‐1448.             (IPICS  NABSA)    Phytochemistry  Letters             1.179  (1.1353)  P.  Mutai,  M.  Heydenreich,  G.  Thoithi,  G.  Mugumbate,  K.  Chibale  and  A.  Yenesew  (2013).  3-­‐Hydroxyisofla-­‐vanones  from  the  stem  bark  of  Dalbergia  melanoxylon:  Isolation,  antimycobacterial  evaluation  and  molec-­‐ular  docking  studies.  Phytochem.  Lett.,  6:671-­‐675.           (IPICS  KEN:02)      Abdissa,  N.,  Induli,  M.,  Akala,  H.M.,  Heydenrich,  M.,  Midiwo,  J.O.,  Albert  Ndakala,  A.,  Yenesew,  A.  (2013).  Knipholone  cyclooxanthrone  and  an  anthraquinone  dimer  with  antiplasmodial  activities  from  the  roots  of  Kniphofia  foliosa.  Phytochem.  Lett.,  6:241-­‐245.             (IPICS  KEN:02)    C.G.  Fru,  L.P.  Sandjo,  V.  Kuete,  J.C.  Liermann,  D.  Schollmeyer,  S.O.  Yeboah,  R.  Mapitse,  B.M.  Abegaz,  B.T.  Ngadjui,  T.Opatz  (2013).  Omphalocarpoidone,  a  new  lanostane-­‐type  furano-­‐spiro-­‐γ-­‐lactone  from  the  wood  of  Tridesmostemon  omphalocarpoides  Engl.  (Sapotaceae).  Phytochem.  Lett.,  6:676-­‐680.                           (IPICS  NABSA)    

 38  

E.M.O.  Yeboah,  R  .R.  T.  Majinda  (2013).  Five  new  agarofuran  sesquiterpene  esters  from  Osyris  lanceolata.  Phytochem.Lett.,  6:531-­‐535.               (IPICS  NABSA)    Polymer  International             2.125  (2.311)  D.A.  Gedefaw,  Y.  Zhou,  Z.  Ma,  Z.  Genene,  S.  Hellström,  F.  Zhang,  W.  Mammo,  O.  Inganäs,  M.R.  Andersson,  (2013).  Conjugated  polymers  with  polar  side  chains  in  bulk-­‐heterojunction  solar  cell  devices.  Polymer  International,  63:22-­‐30.  DOI:  10.1002/pi.4600           (IPICS  ETH:01)    Science  of  the  Total  Environment         3.258  (3.789)  Hellar-­‐Kihampa,  H.,  De  Wael,  K.,  Lugwisha,  E.  Malarvannan,  G.  and  Covaci,  A.  (2013).  Spatial  monitoring  of  organohalogen  compounds  in  surface  water  and  sediments  of  a  rural–urban  river  basin  in  Tanzania.  Sci.  Total  Environ.,  447:186–197.               (IPICS  ANCAP)    Sensors  and  Actuators  B:  Chemical         3.535  (3.668)  Alemnew  Geto,  Marcos  Pita,  Antonio  L.  De  Lacey,  Merid  Tessema,  Shimelis  Admassie  (2013).  Electrochemical  determination  of  berberine  at  a  multi-­‐walled  carbon  nanotubes  modified  glassy  carbon  electrode,  Sensor.  Actuat.  B-­‐Chem.,  183:  96-­‐101.           (IPICS  ETH:01)        Signpost  Open  Access  Journal  of  Organic  and  Biomolecular  Chemistry  E.  M.  Yeboah,  L.  L.  Masutlha,  T.  H.  Tabane  &  G.  S.  Singh  (2013).  Evaluation  of  the  DPPH  radical  scavenging  activity  of  N-­‐salicylideneanilines  and  their  reduction  products  synthesized  by  a  green  protocol.  SOAJ  Org.  Biomolec.  Chem.,  1:201-­‐210               (IPICS  NABSA)    South  African  Journal  of  Chemistry  VC  Obuseng,  BM  Mookantsa,  H  Okatch,  K.  Mosepele,  N.  Torto  (2013).  Extraction  of  pesticides  from  plants  using  SPME  and  QuEChERS,  S.  Afr.  J.  Chem.,  66:183-­‐188         (IPICS  SEANAC)    South  African  Journal  of  Botany           1.409  (1.495)  S.O.  Famuyiwa,  A.N.  Ntumy,  K.  Andrae-­‐Marobela,  S.O.  Yeboah  (2013).  A  new  homoisoflavonoid  and  the  bioactivities  of  some  selected  homoisoflavonoids  from  the  interbulb  surfaces  of  Scilla  nervosa  subsp.  rigidifolia.  S.  Afr.  J.  Bot.,  88:17-­‐22.  DOI:  10.1016/j.sajb.2013.04.009       (IPICS  NABSA)      Talanta                 3.498  (3.733)  Merdassa,  Y.,  Liu,  J.  And  Megersa,  N.  (2013).  Development  of  a  one-­‐step  microwave-­‐assisted  extraction  method  for  simultaneous  determination  of  organophosphorus  pesticides  and  fungicides  in  soils  by  gas  chromatography–mass  spectrometry.  Talanta  114(30):227-­‐234.       (IPICS  ANCAP)    Textile  Research  Journal           1.135  (1.458)  M.V.  Limaye,  Z.  Bacsik,  C.  Schütz,  A.  Dembelé,  M.  Pléa,  L.  Andersson,  G.  Salazar-­‐Alvarez,  L.  Bergström  

(2013).  On  the  role  of  tannins  and  iron  in  the  Bogolan  or  mud  cloth  dyeing  process.  Text.  Res.  J.,  82(18)1888–1896.                 (IPICS  MAL:01)    Water  SA               0.876  (1.009)  G.  Darko,  S.  Chigome,  S.  Lillywhite,  Z.  Tshentu,  J.  Darkwa  and  N.  Torto,  (2013).  Sorption  of  toxic  metal  ions  in  aqueous  environment  using  electrospun  polystyrene  fibres  incorporating  diazole  ligands.  Water  SA,  39:39-­‐46.  DOI:  http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/wsa.v39i1.6         (IPICS  SEANAC)      Books,  Book  Chapters,  Popular  Publications,  Technical  Reports,  etc.      AiBST  Newsletter  Vol.  19,  December  2013.  http://www.aibst.com/images/downloads/10-­‐years_of_Visionary_Endeavour/A.pdf             (IPICS  AiBST)    A.  Bhowmik,  L.A.  Khan  &  B.  Rokeya  (2013).  Antidiabetic  effects  of  Mangifera  Indica  on  Diabetic  rat  models.  LAMBERT  Academic  publications,  Saarbrücken,  Germany.  (136  pp.)     (IPICS  ANRAP)    Ermias  Dagne  (2013).  Honey.  What’s  Out!  Addis,  August.         (IPICS  ALNAP)    

 39  

Ermias  Dagne  (2013).  Tazma.  What’s  Out!  Addis,  October.         (IPICS  ALNAP)    Ermias  Dagne  (2013).  Gum  Arabica,  a  multipurpose  natural  product.  What’s  Out!  Addis,  December.                       (IPICS  ALNAP)    C.  Masimirembwa  (2013).  The  metabolism  of  antiparasitic  drugs  and  pharmacogenetics  in  African  populations:  From  molecular  mechanisms  to  clinical  applications,  pp.  195-­‐213.  In:  Ameenah  Gurib-­‐Fakim,  Jacobus  Nicolaas  Eloff  (Eds.),  Chemistry  for  Sustainable  Development  in  Africa.  Springer-­‐Verlag,  Heidelberg.  17-­‐31.                 (IPICS  AiBST)    B.  Ngameni,  Ghislain.  W.  Fotso,  J.  Kamga,  P.  Ambassa,  A.  Tchoukoua,  A.G.  Fankam,  I.K.  Voukeng,  B.T.  Ngadjui,  B.M.  Abegaz,  V.  Kuete  (2013).  Flavonoids  and  Related  Compounds  from  the  Medicinal  Plants  of  Africa.  In:  V.  Kuete  (Ed.)  Medicinal  Plant  Research  in  Africa,  1st  Edition,  Pharmacology  and  Chemistry,  pp.  301-­‐350.  Elsevier,  London,  UK.                                                         (IPICS  NABSA)          W.  Mammo  (2013).  The  role  of  IPICS  in  enhancing  research  on  the  synthesis  and  characterization  of  conducting  polymers  at  Addis  Ababa  University.  In:  Ameenah  Gurib-­‐Fakim,  Jacobus  Nicolaas  Eloff  (Eds.),  Chemistry  for  Sustainable  Development  in  Africa,  pp.  195-­‐213.  Springer-­‐Verlag,  Berlin,  Heidelberg.                       (IPICS  ETH:01)    Begum  Rokeya,  M  Mosihuzzaman,  Nilufar  Nahar,  Liaquat  Ali,  AK  Azad  Khan  (2013).  Use  of  plant  materials  in  the  treatment  of  diabetes.  (2nd  Edition)             (IPICS  ANRAP)    S.O.  Wandiga  (2013).  Rivers  in  Africa  are  in  jeopardy.  In:  Satinder  (Sut)  Ahuja  (Ed.),  Water  quality,  pollution  assessment,  and  remediation  to  assure  sustainability,  pp.  59-­‐79.  Elsevier  B.V.                         (IPICS  ANCAP)    Two  flyers  (of  four  pp.  each)  were  produced  and  disseminated  for  information  and  pedagogical  purposes,  one  on  biopesticides  and  one  on  flavanoids.           (IPICS  BUF:01)              

                       

Zambian  MSc  students  using  the  Shimadzu  UV/Vis  Spectrophotometer  purchased  using  ISP  funds.  (Courtesy  of  IPICS  ZAM:01,  Department  of  Chemistry,  University  of  Zambia,  Lusaka).          

 40  

5.4.2   Mathematics    Table  15.  Summary  by  region  of  number  of  Mathematics  publications.  (L.  Am.  =  Latin  America;  N/A  =  Not  Applicable)     Africa   Asia   L.  Am.   Total  

 Publications  in  Scientific  Journals  (with  TR  Impact  Factors)  Publications  in  Scientific  Journals  (“TR  unlisted”)  Books,  Chapters,  Popular  Publ.,  Technical  Reports,  etc.      Total  number  of  publications  

 15  60  7    

82  

 0  0  0    0  

 N/A  N/A  N/A  

 N/A  

 15  60  7    

82  

 Publications  in  Scientific  Journals  

Acta  Mathematica  Hungarica  Groenwald  N.J  and  Ssevviiri  D.  (2013).  Kothe’s  upper  nil  radical  for  modules.  Acta  Math.  Hung.,  138(4)295-­‐306.                   (IPMS  EAUMP)    Advances  and  Applications  in  Statistics  I.  Kipchirchir  (2013).  Comparative  Analysis  of  Dispersion  Models.  Adv.  Appl.  Stat.,  37(1)13  -­‐35.                         (IPMS  EAUMP)    Advances  in  Computer  Science  :  an  International  Journal  Ibrahima  Diop,  Moussa  Lo,  (2013).  An  Ontology  Design  Pattern  of  the  Multidisciplinary  and  Complex  Field  of  Climate  Change.  ACSIJ,  2(5)6.               (IPMS  BURK:01)    Advances  in  Difference  Equations         0.760  (0.744)  A.  Guiro,  S.  Ouaro  and  A.  Traoré  (2013).  Stability  analysis  of  a  schistosomiasis  model  with  delays.  Adv  Differ  Equ,  303,  15pp.  DOI:  10.1186/1687-­‐1847-­‐2013-­‐303         (IPMS  BURK:01)    Afrika  Matematika  C.  Goudjo,  B.  Lèye,  M.  Sy.  (2013)  Convergence  analysis  of  a  parabolic  nonlinear  system  arising  in  biology.  Afr.  Matem.,  24(2)179-­‐194,  DOI:  10.1007/s13370-­‐011-­‐0052-­‐8     (IPMS  BURK:01)    African  Diaspora  Journal  of  Mathematics  K.  Ezzinbi,  B.A.  Kyelem  and  S.  Ouaro  (2013).  Periodicity  in  the  Alpha-­‐Norm  for  some  partial  functional  differential  equations  with  infinite  delay.  Afr.  Diaspora  J.  Math,  15(1)43-­‐72.     (IPMS  BURK:01)    K.  Ezzinbi,  B.  A.  Kyelem,  S.  Ouaro  (2013).  Periodic  solutions  in  Alpha-­‐Norm  for  some  neutral  partial  func-­‐tional  differential  equations  with  finite  delay.  Afr.  Diaspora  J.  Math.,  24(4)625-­‐645.   (IPMS  BURK:01)    I.  Nonkane  (2013).  The  Weyl  algebra  and  Noetherian  Operators.  Afr.  Diaspora  J.  Math.,  16(1)59-­‐69.                       (IPMS  BURK:01)    Annals  of  the  University  of  Craiova  -­‐  Mathematics  and  Computer  Science  Series  E.  Azroul,  A.  Barbara,  M.  B.  Benboubker  and  S.  Ouaro  (2013).  Renormalized  solutions  for  a  p(x)-­‐Laplacian  equation  with  Neumann  nonhomogeneous  boundary  conditions  and  L1-­‐data.  Ann.  Univ.  Craiova  Math.  Comp.  Sci.  Ser.,  40(1)  9-­‐22               (IPMS  BURK:01)    I.  Nyanquini,  S.  Ouaro  and  S.  Soma  (2013).  Entropy  solution  to  nonlinear  multivalued  elliptic  problem  with  variable  exponents  and  measure  data.  Ann.  Univ.  Craiova.  Math.  Comp.  Sci.  Ser.,  40(2)174-­‐198.                       (IPMS  BURK:01)    Gilbert  Bayili,  Abdoulaye  Sene,  and  Mary  Tew  Niane  (2013).  Control  of  singularities  for  the  Laplace  equation.  Ann.  Univ.  Craiova.  Math.  Comp.  Sci.  Ser.,  40(2)  226-­‐236.       (IPMS  BURK:01)        

 41  

Applied  Mathematical  Sciences  Patrick  Weke  and  Caroline  Ratemo  (2013).  Estimating  IBNR  Claim  Reserves  for  General  Insurance  Using  Archimedean  Copulas.  App.l  Math.  Sci.,  7(25)1223-­‐1237.         (IPMS  EAUMP)    Applied  Mathematics  S.  Ouaro,  A.  Traoré  (2013).  Deterministic  and  stochastic  schistosomiasis  model  with  general  incidence.  Appl.  Math.,  4(12)1682-­‐1693.               (IPMS  BURK:01)    Onyango,  N.O.,  Muller,  J  and  Moindi,  S.  K.  (2013).  Optimal  Vaccination  Strategies  in  an  SIR  Epidemic  Model  with  Time  Scales.  Appl.  Math.,  4(10B)1-­‐14.           (IPMS  EAUMP)    J.  Wairimu  and  W.  Ogana  (2013).  The  dynamics  of  vector-­‐host  feeding  contact  rate  with  saturation:  A  case  of  malaria  in  Western  Kenya.  Appl.  Math.,  4(10)1381-­‐1391.         (IPMS  EAUMP)    Applied  Mathematics  and  Computation  Mervis  Kikonko,  Angelo  B.  Mingarelli  (2013).  On  non-­‐definite  Sturm-­‐Liouville  problems  with  two  turning  points.  Appl.  Math.  Comput.  219:  9508-­‐9515.           (IPMS  EAUMP)    Bulletin  des  Sciences  Mathématiques         0.569  (0.600)  K.  Bahlali,  M.A.Diop,  A.Eouaflin,  A.Said  (2013).  Probabilistic  approach  to  homogenization  of  a  non-­‐divergence  form  semilinear  PDE  with  non-­‐periodic  coefficients.  Bull.  Sci.  Mathémat.  [Online].    DOI:  10.1016/j.bulsci.2013.07.001             (IPMS  BURK:01)    Combinatorics,  Probability  &  Computing  Zelealem  Belaineh,  D.  Krail,  C.H.  Lin,  J.S.  Sereni,  and  P.  Whalen  (2013).  A  new  bound  for  the  2/3  conjecture.  Combin.  Prob.  Comput.,  22:384-­‐393           (IPMS  ETH:01)    Comptes  Rendus  de  l'Académie  des  Sciences,  Ser.  I.  Mathematics   0.477  (0.538)        Christophe  Le  Potier,  Amadou  Mahamane  (2013).  A  nonlinear  correction  and  maximum  principle  for  diffusion  operators  with  hybrid  scheme.  C.  R.  Acad.  Sci.  Paris,  Ser.  I.,  350:101–106.   (IPMS  BURK:01)    Discussiones  Mathematicae  Graph  Theory  Zelealem  B.  Yilma  and  J.S.  Sereni  (2013).  A  tight  bound  on  the  set  chromatic  number.  Disc.  Math.  Graph  Theory,  33:461-­‐465.                 (IPMS  ETH:01)    Electronic  Communications  in  Probability       0.492  (0.629)  Aman,  Auguste,  Abouo  Elouaflin,  &  Mamadou  Abdoul  Diop  (2013).  Representation  theorems  for  SPDEs  via  backward  doubly.  ECP  [Online],  18:1-­‐15             (IPMS  BURK:01)      Electronic  Journal  of  Combinatorics         0.532  (0.599)  Zelealem  Belaineh,  T.  Kaiser,  and  J.S.  Sereni  (2013).  Multiple  Peterson  subdivisions  in  permutation  graphs.  Electron  J  Comb,  20:37.               (IPMS  ETH:01)    Electronic  Journal  of  Differential  Equations       0.426  Guiro,  B.  Koné  and  S.  Ouaro  (2013).  Weak  heteroclinic  solutions  of  anisotropic  difference  equations  with  variable  exponent.  EJDA,  225:1-­‐9.  DOI:  10.1214/ECP.v18-­‐2223       (IPMS  BURK:01)      Expert  Systems  with  Applications         1.854  (2.339)  Luukka  P,  Kurama  O  (2013).  Similarity  classifier  with  ordered  weighed  averaging  operators.  Expert  Syst  Appl,  40(4)  95-­‐1002.                 (IPMS  EAUMP)    Far  East  Journal  of  Applied  Mathematics  J.  Kasozi  and  W.C.  Mahera  (2013).  Dividend  payouts  in  a  perturbed  risk  process  compounded  by  Investment  of  the  Black-­‐Scholes  type.  Far  East  J.  Appl.  Math.,  82(1)1-­‐16.     (IPMS  EAUMP)    Far  East  Journal  of  Mathematical  Sciences  B.  M.  Nzimbi,  G.  P.  Pokhariyal  and  S.  K.  Moindi  (2013).  A  note  on  metric  equivalence  of  some  operators.  Far  East  J.  Math.  Sci.,  75(2)301-­‐318.               (IPMS  EAUMP)    

 42  

Frontiers  of  Mathematics  in  China         0.323  Caraballo,  T.,  Diop,  M.A.  (2013).  Neutral  stochastic  delay  partial  functional  integro-­‐differential  equations  driven  by  a  fractional  Brownian  motion.  Front.  Math.  China,  8(4)745–760.     (IPMS  BURK:01)    iCASTOR  Journal  of  Mathematical  Sciences  Egbert  Mujuni  (2013).  Connected  Dominating  Set  Problem  for  Hypercubes  and  Grid  Graphs.  iCASTOR  J.  Math.  Sci.,  7(2)81-­‐89.                   (IPMS  EAUMP)    International  Electronic  Journal  of  Algebra  Groenwald  N.J  and  Ssevviiri  D.  (2013).  Completely  prime  modules.  Int.  Elec.  J.  Algebra,  13:1-­‐14.                       (IPMS  EAUMP)    International  Electronic  Journal  of  Pure  and  Applied  Mathematics  Waema  R.  Mbogo,  Livingstone  S.  Luboobi  and  John  W.  Odhiambo  (2013).  Mathematical  Model  for  HIV  and  CD4+  Cells  Dynamics  in  Vivo.  IEJPAM,  6(2)83-­‐103.           (IPMS  EAUMP)    International  Journal  of  Adaptive,  Resilient  and  Autonomic  Systems  C.  Niang,  B.  Bouchou,  Y.  Sam,  M.  Lo  (2013).  A  Semi-­‐Automatic  approach  For  Global-­‐Schema  Construction  in  Data  Integration  Systems.  IJARAS  4(2)19  pp.             (IPMS  BURK:01)    International  Journal  of  Advanced  Research  in  Computer  Science  Mushi  A.  R.,  Chacha  S.  (2013).  Optimal  Solution  Strategy  for  University  Course  Timetabling  Problem.  IJARCS,  4(2)35-­‐40.                 (IPMS  EAUMP)    Mushi  A.  R.,  Marwa  Y.  (2013).  Late  Acceptance  Heuristic  for  University’s  Course  Timetabling  Problem.  IJARCS,  4(2)  88-­‐92.                 (IPMS  EAUMP)    International  Journal  of  Advances  in  Computer  Science  and  Technology  Mushi  A.  R.,  Kahebo  M.,  Mujuni  E.  (2013).  Optimization  of  Municipal  Solid  Waste  Management  Problem  with  Composting  Plants  –  The  case  of  Ilala  Municipality,  IJACST,  2(8)165-­‐169.   (IPMS  EAUMP)      International  Journal  of  Algebra  Ssevviiri  D.  (2013).  Characterisation  of  non-­‐nilpotent  elements  of  the  Z-­‐module  Z/(pk1  ×  ·  ·  ·  ×  pkn)Z.  IJA,  7(15)699-­‐702.                   (IPMS  EAUMP)    International  Journal  of  Applied  Mathematics  and  Statistics  Sangare,  B.,  Diallo,  O.,  Some,  L.  (2013).  An  analysis  of  stability  and  convergence  of  a  finite-­‐difference  methods  for  one-­‐dimensional  partial  integro-­‐differential  equation  using  a  moving  mesh.  IJAMAS,  50(20)1-­‐13.                   (IPMS  BURK:01)    Kasozi  J.,  Mayambala  F.,  Mahera  C.W.  (2013).  Controlling  ultimate  ruin  probability  by  quota-­‐share  reinsurance  arrangements.  IJAMAS,  49(19)1-­‐15.           (IPMS  EAUMP)    International  Journal  of  Computer  Engineering  and  Applications  M.A.  Selemani,  E  Mujuni  and  A.  Mushi  (2013).  An  examination  scheduling  algorithm  using  graph  coloring  –  the  case  of  Sokoine  University  of  Agriculture.  IJCEA,  III(I)116-­‐127.     (IPMS  EAUMP)    International  Journal  of  Differential  Equations  B.  K.  Bonzi,  S.  Ouaro  and  F  D.  Zongo  (2013).  Entropy  solutions  for  nonlinear  elliptic  anisotropic  homogeneous  Neumann  problem.  Int.  J.  Differ.  Equ.  2013,  Article  ID  476781,  14  pp.   (IPMS  BURK:01)    International  Journal  of  Dynamics  and  Control  Sène,  M.  S.  Goudiaby  et  G.  Kreiss  (2013).  A  delayed  feedback  control  for  network  of  open  canals,  Int.  J.  Dynam.  Control.  DOI  10.1007/s40435-­‐013-­‐0028-­‐7         (IPMS  BURK:01)    International  Journal  of  Ecological  Economics  and  Statistics  Ahmada  O.  Ali,  W.M.Charles,  N.Mtega  (2013).  Advection  Diffusion  model  for  atmospheric  pollutants  dispersion,  IJEES,  3(30).                 (IPMS  EAUMP)    

 43  

International  Journal  of  Mathematical  Archive  Yibeltal  Yitayew,  B.  Bekele,  K.  Venkateswarlu  (2013).  On  certain  kinds  of  characterizations  of  Almost  Primary  Ideals  in  Boolean  like  semi  rings.  IJMA  4(06)  202-­‐207.       (IPMS  ETH:01)    International  Journal  of  Mathematical  Research  K.K.  Said,  E.  Luvanda,  E.S.  Massawe  (2013).  Mathematical  analysis  of  the  impact  of  real  exchange  rate  on  output  growth  and  inflation:  The  case  of  Tanzania  Zanzibar.  Int.  J.  Math.  Res.,  2(4):23-­‐36.                         (IPMS  EAUMP)      International  Journal  of  Optimization  and  Control:  Theories  &  Applications  A.M.  Kassa  and  S.M.  Kassa  (2013).  A  multi-­‐parametric  programming  algorithm  for  special  classes  of  non-­‐convex  multilevel  optimization  problems.  IJOCTA,  3:133-­‐144.       (IPMS  ETH:01)    International  Journal  of  Research  and  Reviews  in  Applicable  Mathematics  and  Computer  Science  Monica  Kung’aro,  E.  S.  Massawe,  O.  D.  Makinde  (2013).  Transmission  Dynamics  OF  HIV/AIDS  with  Screening  and  Non-­‐linear  Incidence,  RRAMCS,  3(1)28-­‐43.             (IPMS  EAUMP)    S.  Chibaya,  M.  Kgosimore,  E.S.  Massawe  (2013).  Mathematical  Analysis  of  Vertical  Transmission  model  of  HIV/AIDS  with  Treatment,  RRAMCS,  3(2)57-­‐73.           (IPMS  EAUMP)    International  Journal  of  Scientific  and  Innovative  Mathematical  Research  Jean  Marie  Ntaganda  (2013).  Matlab  Design  for  Solving  an  Orthostatic  Stress  Optimal  Control  Problem  of  Cardiovascular-­‐Respiratory  System.  IJSIMR,  1(2)103-­‐116.         (IPMS  EAUMP)    Jean  Marie  Ntaganda  (2013).  MATLAB  Design  for  Solving  a  Mathematical  Model  of  Insulin  Dynamic.  IJSIMR,  1(3)225-­‐233.                 (IPMS  EAUMP)    ISRN  Biomathematics  Waema  R.  Mbogo,  Livingstone  S.  Luboobi  and  John  W.  Odhiambo  (2013).  Stochastic  Model  for  In-­‐Host  HIV  Dynamics  with  Therapeutic  Intervention.  ISRN  Biomathematics  2013,  ID  103708,  11  pp.  DOI:  10.1155/2013/103708                 (IPMS  EAUMP)    Journal  of  Algebra  and  Its  Applications         0.342  (0.410)  Groenwald  N.J  and  Ssevviiri  D.  (2013)  2-­‐primal  modules.  J.  Algebra  Applic,  12:1250226.  DOI:10.1142/S021949881250226X             (IPMS  EAUMP)      Journal  of  Applied  Analysis  and  Computation  E.  Azroul,  M.  B.  Benboubker  and  S.  Ouaro  (2013).  Entropy  solutions  for  nonlinear  nonhomogeneous  Neumann  problems  involving  the  generalized  p(x)-­‐Laplace  operator.  J.  Appl.  Anal.  Comput.  3(2)105-­‐121                     (IPMS  BURK:01)    Journal  of  Applied  Mathematics  and  Statistics  Juma  Kasozi,  Charles  Wilson  Mahera  and  Fred  Mayambala  (2013).  Controlling  Ultimate  Ruin  Probability  by  Quota-­‐Share  Reinsurance  Arrangements.,  IJAMAS,  49(19).       (IPMS  EAUMP)    Journal  of  Graph  Theory           0.626  (0.702)  Zelealem  Belaineh  (2013).  Antimagic  properties  of  Graphs  with  large  maximum  Degree,  J  Graph  Theor,  72:367-­‐373.                   (IPMS  ETH:01)    Journal  of  Mathematical  Biology         2.366  (2.733)  Onyango,  N.O.,  and  Muller,  J.  (2013).  Determination  of  optimal  vaccination  strategies  using  an  orbital  stability  threshold  from  periodically  driven  systems.  J.  Math.  Biol.,  4:3-­‐24.     (IPMS  EAUMP)  DOI:  10.1007/s00285-­‐013-­‐0648-­‐8                Journal  of  Mathematical  Finance  Fredrick  Mayanja,  Sure  Mataramvura,  Wilson  Mahera  Charles  (2013).  A  Mathematical  Approach  To  A  Stocks  Portfolio  Selection:  The  Case  of  Uganda  Securities  Exchange  (USE).  J.  Math.  Finance.  3(4).                       (IPMS  EAUMP)    

 44  

Journal  of  Mathematics  Research  Guiro  ,  A.  Iggidr  and  D.  Ngom  (2013).  On  the  Dynamic  Regulation  of  a  Non  Linear  Model  Fish  Population.  J.  Math.  Res.,  5(2)84-­‐93.                 (IPMS  BURK:01)    Journal  of  Pipeline  Systems  B.  Toumbou,  J.-­‐P.  Villeneuve,  G.  Beardsell  and  S.  Duchesne  (2013)  Development  of  a  general  model  for  water  distribution  pipe  breaks:  Methodology  and  application  to  a  small  city  in  Quebec,  Canada.  J.  Pipeline  Syst.  DOI:10.1061/(ASCE)PS.1949-­‐1204.0000135.           (IPMS  BURK:01)    Le  Matematiche  B.  K.  Bonzi,  S.  Ouaro  and  F  D.  Zongo  (2013).  Entropy  solutions  to  nonlinear  elliptic  anisotropic  problems  with  Robin  type  boundary  conditions.  Le  Matemat.  68(2)53-­‐76.       (IPMS  BURK:01)            Lecture  Notes  of  the  Institute  for  Computer  Sciences,  Social  Informatics  and  Telecommunications  Engineering  P.  A.  Cisse,  J.  M.  Dembele,  M.  Lo,  C.  Cambier  (2013).  Assessing  the  Spatial  Impact  on  an  Agent-­‐Based  Modeling  of  Epidemic  Control:  Case  of  Schistosomiasis.  Lecture  Notes  Inst.  Comp.  Sci.,  Social  Inform.  Telecom.  Eng.,  126:58-­‐69.               (IPMS  BURK:01)    Mathematical  Population  Studies         0.957  (0.790)  Mureith  EW,  Anguelov  R,  Dumont  Y,  Lubuma  JM-­‐S  (2013).  Stability  Analysis  and  Dynamics  preserving  NSFD  schemes  for  a  malaria  model.  Math.  Pop.  Stud.,  20(2).  DOI:10.1080/08898480.2013.777240                         (IPMS  EAUMP)            Mediterranean  Journal  of  Mathematics  A.  OUEDRAOGO  and  J.D.D.  ZABSONRE  (2014).  Continuous  dependence  of  renormalized  solution  for  nonlinear  degenerate  parabolic  problems  in  the  whole  space.  MedJM.  (Publ.  online  5  July  2013)    DOI  10.1007/s00009-­‐013-­‐0328-­‐3             (IPMS  BURK:01)                        Nonlinear  Analysis:  Real  World  Applications    J.D.D.  Zabsonre  C.  Lucas  and  A.  Ouedraogo  (2013).  Strong  solutions  for  a  1D  viscous  bilayer  Shallow  Water  model.  Nonlin.  Anal.  Real  World  Appl.,  14(2)1216-­‐1224.       (IPMS  BURK:01)    B.  Toumbou  and  A.  Mohammadian  (2013).  Existence  and  smoothness  of  continuous  and  discrete  solutions  of  a  two-­‐dimensional  shallow  water  problem  over  movable  beds  with  nonlinear  sediment  transport  relationship.  Nonlin.  Anal.  Real  World  Appl.,  14(1)246-­‐263  DOI:10.1016/j.nonrwa.2012.06.002                     (IPMS  BURK:01)    Nonlinear  Analysis:  Theory,  Methods  &  Applications  B.  Toumbou  and  A.  Mohammadian  (2013).  Existence  and  smoothness  of  continuous  and  discrete  solutions  of  a  two-­‐dimensional  shallow  water  problem  over  movable  beds.  Nonlin.  Anal.  Real  World  Appl.,  76:244–256.  DOI:10.1016/j.na.2012.08.021             (IPMS  BURK:01)    Open  Journal  of  Applied  Sciences  J.M.  Ntaganda,  and  B.  Mampassi  (2013).  An  optimal  control  problem  for  hypoxemic  hypoxia  tissue-­‐blood  carbon  dioxid  exchange  during  physical  activity.  Open  J.  Appl.  Sci.,  3(1)56-­‐61.   (IPMS  EAUMP)    Jean  Marie  Ntaganda  (2013).  Fuzzy  Logic  Strategy  for  Solving  an  Optimal  Control  problem  of  Glucose  and  Insulin  in  Diabetic  Human.  Open  J.  Appl.  Sci.,  3(7)421-­‐429.         (IPMS  EAUMP)    Open  Journal  of  Epidemiology  S.  Chibaya,  M.  Kgosimore,  E.S.  Massawe  (2013).  Mathematical  Analysis  of  Drug  Resistance  in  Vertical  Transmission  of  HIV/AIDS.  Open  J.  Epidemiol.,  3:139-­‐148.         (IPMS  EAUMP)    Open  Journal  of  Fluid  Dynamics  Mureithi,  EW,  Mwaonanji,  JJ,  Makinde,  OD  (2013).  On  the  boundary  layer  flow  past  a  continuously  moving  flat  surface  with  temperature  dependent  viscosity.  Open  J.  Fluid  Dyn.,  3:135-­‐140.   (IPMS  EAUMP)        

 45  

Physical  Review  E             2.313  (2.307)  D.  Sangaré,  V.V.  Mourzenko,  J.-­‐F.  Thovert  and  P.  M.  Adler  (2013).  Interaction  between  a  fracture  network  and  a  cubic  cavity,  Phys.  Rev.  E,  88:033015.           (IPMS  BURK:01)    Pioneer  Journal  of  Mathematics  and  Mathematical  Sciences  B.  M.  Nzimbi,  G.  P.  Pokhariyal  and  S.  K.  Moindi  (2013).  A  note  on  A-­‐self-­‐adjoint  and  A-­‐skew-­‐adjoint  operators  and  their  extensions.  Pioneer  J.  Math.  Math.  Sci.,  7(1)1-­‐36.     (IPMS  EAUMP)    Scottish  Journal  of  Arts,  Social  Sciences  and  Scientific  Studies  Alphonce  C.  B.  (2013).  Industrial  Applications  of  the  Analytic  Hierarchy  Process  in  Developing  Countries.  Scottish  J.  Arts  Soc.  Sci.  Sci.  Stud.,  16(1)30-­‐37.           (IPMS  EAUMP)    K.  Chuncky,  D.O.  Makinde,  E.S.  Massawe  (2013).  Transmission  Dynamics  of  HIV-­‐Malaria  Co-­‐infection  with  Treatment.  Scottish  J.  Arts  Soc.  Sci.  Sci.  Stud.,  12(2)108-­‐132.       (IPMS  EAUMP)    Semigroup  Forum             0.455  (0.542)    Mamadou  Abdoul  Diop,  Khalil  Ezzinbi,  Modou  Lo  (2013).  Exponential  stability  for  some  stochastic  neutral  partial  functional  integrodifferential  equations  with  delays  and  Poisson  jumps.  Semigroup  Forum  (published  online  4  Dec.).  DOI  10.1007/S00233-­‐013-­‐9555-­‐y       (IPMS  BURK:01)  

SIAM  Journal  on  Applied  Mathematics         1.577  (1.635)  T.  Goudon,  M.  Sy  et  L.  M.  Tine  (2013).  A  fluid-­‐kinetic  model  for  particulate  flows  with  coagulation  and  break-­‐up:  stationary  solutions,  stability  and  hydrodynamic  regimes.  SIAM  J.  Appl.  Math.  73(1)401-­‐421.  DOI:  10.1137/120861515.               (IPMS  BURK:01)    Universal  Journal  of  Mathematics  and  Mathematical  Sciences  Porkhariyal  GP,  Moindi  SK,  Nzimbi  BM  (2013).  W2-­‐Recurrent  LP-­‐Sasakian  Manifold.  Univ.  J.  Math.  Math.  Sci.,  3(2)119-­‐128.                 (IPMS  EAUMP)      Books,  Book  Chapters,  Popular  Publications,  Technical  Reports,  etc.      G.  Camara,  S.  Despres,  R.  Djedidi,  M.  Lo  (2013).  Design  of  schistosomiasis  ontology  (IDOSCHISTO)  extending  the  Infectious  Disease  Ontology.  In:  Proceedings  of  the  14th  World  Congress  on  Medical  and  Health  Informatics,  19-­‐23  August  2013,  Copenhagen,  Denmark.         (IPMS  BURK:01)    G.  Camara,  S.  Despres,  R.  Djedidi,  M.  Lo  (2013)  Vers  un  système  de  veille  épidémiologique  fondé  sur  une  ontologie:  Application  à  la  bilharziose  au  Sénégal.  Actes  du  5e  Colloque  National  sur  la  Recherche  en  Informatique  et  ses  applications  (CNRIA’13),  24-­‐27  April  2013,  Ziguinchor,  Sénégal.   (IPMS  BURK:01)    Diop,  M.  Lo,  J.  M.  Dembele,  P.  A.  Cisse  (2013).  Architecture  d’un  système  multi-­‐agents  sémantique:  Application  au  domaine  changement  climatique  et  vulnérabilité  urbaine.  Actes  du  5e  Colloque  National  sur  la  Recherche  en  Informatique  et  ses  Applications  (CNRIA’13),  24-­‐27  April  2013,  Ziguinchor,  Sénégal.                     (IPMS  BURK:01)    Ndanguza  Denis  (2013).  Numerical  and  Nonlinear  Analysis  –  Applicatrion  to  real  life  problems.  Lambert  Academic  Publishing.                 (IPMS  EAUMP)    Charles  Wilson  Mahera  and  Anton  Mtega  Narsis  (2013)  Modelling  of  Sediment  Transport  in  Shallow  Waters  by  Stochastic  and  Partial  Differential  Equations.  In:  Andrew  J.  Manning  (ed.),  Earth  and  Planetary  Sciences.  Sediment  Transport  Processes  and  Their  Modelling  Applications,  pp.  309  –  328.  ISBN  978-­‐953-­‐51-­‐1039-­‐2                   (IPMS  EAUMP)    Patrick  Weke  and  Matthieu  Dufour  (2013).  Basic  Actuarial  Techniques  for  Insurance  Professionals.  World  Bank  Publication.                 (IPMS  EAUMP)    Josephine  Wairimu,  Gauthier  Sallet  and  Wandera  Ogana  (2013).  Mathematical  Modeling  of  Highland  Malaria  in  Western  Kenya.  Lambert  Academic  Publishing.         (IPMS  EAUMP)    

 46  

5.4.3   Physics    Table  16.  Summary  by  region  of  number  of  Physics  publications  (L.  Am.  =  Latin  America)     Africa   Asia   L.  Am.   Total  

 Publications  in  Scientific  Journals  (with  TR  Impact  Factors)  Publications  in  Scientific  Journals  (“TR  unlisted”)  Books,  Chapters,  Popular  Publ.,  Technical  Reports,  etc.      Total  number  of  publications  

 10  22  2    

34  

 11  12  1    

24  

 6  0  0    6  

 27  34  3    

64  

 Publications  in  Scientific  Journals    Advanced  Chemistry  Letters      M.K.  Das,  M.M.  Rahman,  B.M.  Sonia,  F.  Ahmed,  Md.A.  Hossain,  M.  Rahman,  M.S.  Bashar,  T.  Hossain,  D.  K.  Saha,  S.  Akhter  (2013).  Dielectric  and  Electrical  Properties  of  Lithium-­‐Magnesium  Ferrites.  Adv.  Chem.  Lett.,  1(2)  04-­‐110.  DOI:  10.1166/acl.2013.1022           (IPPS  BAN:02)    Z.H.  Khan,  M.  M.  Rahman,  S.S.  Sikder,  M.A.  Hakim,  S.  Akhter,  H.  N.  Das  and  B.  Anjuman  (2013).  Thermal  Hysteresis  of  Permeability  and  Transport  Properties  of  Cu  Substituted  Ni0.28Cu0.10+xZn0.62-­‐xFe1.98O4  Ferrites.  Adv.  Chem.  Lett.,  1(2)104-­‐110.  DOI:  10.1166/acl.2013.1016       (IPPS  BAN:02)    Advanced  Materials  Letters    C.O.  Chey,  H.  K.  Patra,  M.  Tengdelius,  M.  Golabi,  O.P.,  R.  Imani,  S.A.  .  Elhag,  W.  Yandi,  and  A.  Tiwari  (2013).  Impact  of  nanotoxicology  towards  technologists  to  end  users.  Adv.  Mat.  Lett.,  4(8)591–597.    DOI:  10.5185/amlett.2013.8002               (IPPS  CAM:01)    Advances  in  Remote  Sensing    C.  Chuma,  D.J.  Hlatywayo,  O.O.I.  Orimoogunje,  J.O.  Akinyede  (2013).  Application  of  Remote  Sensing  and  Geographical  Information  Systems  in  Determining  the  Groundwater  Potential  in  the  Crystalline  Basement  of  Bulawayo  Metropolitan  Area,  Zimbabwe.  Adv.  Remote  Sensing,  2(2)  49-­‐161.     (IPPS  ZIM:01)  DOI:  10.4236/ars.2013.22019              Aerosol  &  Air  Quality  Research        Makokha  J.W.  and  Angeyo  K.H.  (2013).  Investigation  of  the  Radiative  Characteristics  of  the  Kenyan  Atmosphere  due  to  Aerosols  Using  Sun  Spectrophotometry  Measurements  and  the  COART  Model.  Aerosol  Air  Qual.  Res.,  13:201-­‐208.               (IPPS  KEN:04)    American  Journal  of  Material  Science  B.V.  Odari,  R.J.  Musembi,  M.J.  Mageto,  H.  Othieno,  F.  Gaitho,  M.  Mghendi,  V.  Muramba  (2013).  Optoelectronic  properties  of  F-­‐co-­‐doped  PTO  Thin  Films  Deposited  by  Spray  Pyrolysis.  Am.  J.  Mat.  Sci.,  3(4)91–99.  DOI:10.5923/j.materials.20130304.05           (IPPS  KEN:02)                         (IPPS  KEN:03)    Applied  Surface  Science             2.112  (2.099)  K.  Khun,  Z.  H.  Ibupoto,  C.O.  Chey,  J.  Lu,  O.  Nur,  M.  Willander  (2013).  Comparative  study  of  ZnO  nanorods  and  thin  films  for  chemical  and  biosensing  applications  and  the  development  of  ZnO  nanorods  based  potentiometric  strontium  ion  sensor.  Appl.  Surface  Sci.,  268:37–43.  DOI:10.1016/j.apsusc.2012.11.141                     (IPPS  CAM:01)    Australian  Journal  of  Basic  and  Applied  Sciences  B.V.  Odari,  M.  Mageto,  R.J.  Musembi,  H.  Othieno,  F.  Gaitho,  V.  Muramba  (2013).  Optical  and  Electrical  Properties  of  Pd  Doped  SnO2  Thin  Films  Deposited  by  Spray  Pyrolysis.  Aust.  J.  Basic  Appl.  Sci.,  7(2)89–98.                     (IPPS  KEN:02)  

  (IPPS  KEN:03)        

 47  

Bangladesh  Journal  of  Physics  P.  Bala,  R.  Karim.  M.  N.  Hossan  and  D.  K.  Saha  (2013).  Crystallite  Thickness  Distributions  on  Thermal  Transformation  of  Octadecylalkylammonium  Intercalated  Na-­‐Montmorillonite.  Bangl.  J.  Phys.,  13:7-­‐14.                     (IPPS  BAN:02)    S.  Shahanur,  M.  Hasan,  Q.  Ahsan  and  D.K.  Saha  (2013).  Effect  of  Fire  Retardant  Treatment  on  Thermal  Properties  of  Jute  Fiber.  Bangl.  J.  Phys.,  13:45-­‐50.             (IPPS  BAN:02)    S.  Karimunnesa,  D.P.  Paul,  S.  Akhter,  Shireen  Akhter,  D.K.  Saha  and  H.N.  Das  (2013).  Investigations  on  the  Structural,  Magnetic  and  Electrical  Properties  of  Li0.5-­‐x/2CdxBi0.02Fe2.48-­‐x/2O4  Ferrites  with  the  Variation  of  Cd  Concentration.  Bangl.  J.  Phys.,  13:99-­‐106.           (IPPS  BAN:02)    Chemical  Communications           6.378  (6.226)  P.J.  Thomas,  E.B.  Mubofu,  P.  O’Brien  (2013).  Thin  films  of  metals,  metal  chalcogenides  and  oxides  deposited  at  the  water–oil  interface  using  molecular  precursors.  Chem.  Comm.,  49:118-­‐127.  DOI:10.1039/C2CC37146D               (IPPS  MSSEESA)    East  African  Journal  of  Engineering,  Science  and  Technology  M.J.  Mageto,  V.  Muramba,  M.  Mwamburi  (2013).  Preparation  and  Characterization  of  Transparent  and  Conducting  Aluminum  doped  Tin  Oxide  thin  films  prepared  by  Spray  Pyrolysis  Technique.  E.  Afr.  J.  Eng.  Sci.  Technol.,  1(2)30-­‐39.                 (IPPS  KEN:03)    Elixir  Thin  Film  Technology    L.K.  Munguti,  R.J.  Musembi,  W.K.  Njoroge  (2013).  ZnO:Sn  deposition  by  reactive  evaporation:  effects  of  doping  on  the  electrical  and  optical  properties.  Elixir  Thin  Film  Technol.,  6:17162-­‐17165.                         (IPPS  KEN:02)    Energy  and  Environmental  Science         11.653  (12.462)  C.  Lin,  L.A.  Pfaltzgraff,  L.  Herrero-­‐Davila,  E.B.  Mubofu,  A.  Solhy,  J.  Clark,  A.  Koutinas,  N.  Kopsahelis,  K.  Stamatelatou,  F.  Dickson,  S.  Thankappan,  M.  Zahouily,  R.  Brocklesby  and  R.  Luque  (2013).  Food  waste  as  a  valuable  resource  for  the  production  of  chemicals,  materials  and  fuels.  Current  situation  and  global  perspective.  Energy  Environ.  Sci.,  6:426-­‐464.     (IPPS  MSSEESA)  DOI:10.1039/C2EE23440H                        European  Physical  Journal  Applied  Physics       0.710  (0.766)  M.  Karimipour,  M.  Mageto,  R.  Etefagh,  E.  Azhir,  M.  Mwamburi  and  Z.  Topalian  (2013).  Room  Temperature  Magnetization  in  Co  doped  Anatase  phase  of  TiO2.  Eur.  Phys.  J.  Appl.  Phys.  61(1)10601(6  pp.),    DOI:  10.1051/epjap/2012120243             (IPPS  KEN:03)    Geology                 4.087  (4.660)  Hammond,  J.O.S.,  J-­‐M.  Kendall,  G.W.  Stuart,  C.J.  Ebinger,  I.D.  Bastow,  D.  Keir,  A.  Ayele,  M.  Belachew,  B.  Goitom,  G.  Ogubazghi,  T.  Wright  (2013).  Small-­‐scale  upwelling  and  buoyancy  driven  flow  under  Afar  at  onset  of  seafloor  spreading.  Geology,  41(6)  635–638.  DOI:10.1130/G33925.1   (IPPS  ESARSWG)    Global  Advanced  Research  Journal  of  Physical  and  Applied  Sciences  Mulwa,  J.K.,  Mwega  B.W.,  Kiura  M.K.  (2013).  Hydrogeochemical  analysis  and  evaluation  of  water  quality  in  Lake  Chala  catchment  area,  Kenya.  Glob.  Adv.  Res.  J.  Phys.  Appl.  Sci.,  2(1)1-­‐7.     (IPPS  KEN:05)    Global  Journal  of  Pure  and  Applied  Sciences  B.  Korgo,  J.C  Roger  and  J.  Bathiebo  (2013).  Climatology  of  air  mass  trajectories  and  aerosol  optical  thickness  over  Ouagadougou.  Glob.  J.  Pure  Appl.  Sci.,  19:169–181.         (IPPS  BUF:01)  DOI:  10.4314/gjpas.v19i1.1.22                              Hydrological  Processes             2.497  (2.805)  Juston,  J.M.,  Kauffeldt,  A.,  Montano,  B.Q.,  Seibert,  J.,  Beven,  K.J.  and  Westerberg,  I.K.  (2013).  Smiling  in  the  rain:  Seven  reasons  to  be  positive  about  uncertainty  in  hydrological  modelling.  Hydrol.  Proc.,  27(7)1117-­‐1122.  DOI:10.1002/hyp.9625               (IPPS  NADMICA)        

 48  

Hydrology  Research             1.156  (1.181)  Kizza,  M.,  Guerrero,  J-­‐L.,  Rodhe,  A.,  Xu,  C.Y.,Ntale,  H.K.  (2013).  Modelling  catchment  inflows  into  Lake  Victoria:  regionalisation  of  the  parameters  of  a  conceptual  water  balance  model.  Hydrol.  Res.,  44(5)789-­‐808.  DOI:  10.2166/nh.2012.152               (IPPS  NADMICA)    IEEE  Transactions  on  Nanobioscience         1.286  (1.750)  S.  Manjura  Hoque,  C.  Srivastava,  N.  Srivastava,  N.  Venkateshan  and  K.  Chattopadhyay  (2013).  Synthesis,  Characterization,  and  Nuclear  Magnetic  Resonance  Study  of  Chitosan-­‐Coated  Mn1-­‐xZnxFe2O4  Nanocrystals.  IEEE  Trans.  Nanobiosci.,  12:298  –  303.  DOI:10.1109/TNB.2013.2279845     (IPPS  BAN:02)                          Indian  Journal  of  Physics           1.785  (1.070)  K.M.A.  Hussain,  J.  Podder  and  D.K.  Saha  (2013).  Synthesis  of  CuInS2  Thin  Films  by  Spray  Pyrolysis  Deposition  System.  Ind.  J.  Phys.,  87(2):141-­‐146.  DOI:  10.1007/s12648-­‐012-­‐0196-­‐x   (IPPS  BAN:02)                      International  Journal  of  Applied  Earth  Observation  and  Geoinformation                     2.176  (2.557)  Fusilli  L.,  Collins  M.O.,  Laneve  G,  Palombo  A.,  Pignatti  S.  and  Santini  F.  (2013).  Assessment  of  the  abnormal  growth  of  floating  macrophytes  in  Winam  Gulf  (Kenya)  by  using  MODIS  imagery  time  series.  Int.  J.  Appl.  Earth  Obs.  Geoinform.,  20:33–41.    DOI:10.1016/j.jag.2011.09.002       (IPPS  KEN:04)                        International  Journal  of  Computer  Science  and  Security  J.  Opoku-­‐Ansah,  B.  Anderson,  M.J.  Eghan,  J.N.  Boampong,  P.  Osei-­‐Wusu  Adueming,  C.L.Y.  Amuah  and  A.G.  Akyea  (2013).  Automated  Protocol  for  Counting  Malaria  Parasites  (P.  falciparum)  from  Digital  Microscopic  Image  Based  on  L*a*b*  Colour  Model  and  K-­‐Means  Clustering.  Int.  J.  Comp.  Sci.  Secur.,  7(4)149–158.                   (IPPS  AFSIN)    International  Journal  of  Earth  Sciences         2.261  (2.532)  Conde  V,  Bredemeyer  S,  Duarte  E,  Pacheco  J,  Miranda  S,  Galle  B,  Hansteen  T  (2013).  SO2  degassing  fromTurrialba  Volcano  linked  to  seismic  signatures  during  the  period  2008–2012.  Int.  J.  Earth  Sci.,  102:1-­‐16.  DOI:10.1007/s00531-­‐013-­‐0958-­‐5.             (IPPS  NADMICA)      International  Journal  of  Emerging  Technology  and  Advanced  Engineering  Otakwa  R.V.M.,  Simiyu  J.,  Mwabora,  J.M.  (2013).  Dye-­‐Sensitized  and  Amorphous  Silicon  Photovoltaic  (PV)  Devices’  Outdoor  Performance:  A  Comparative  Study.  Int.  J.  Emerg.  Technol.  Adv.  Eng.,  3:532–538.                       (IPPS  KEN:02)    International  Journal  of  Energy  Engineering  R.  Musembi,  B.  Aduda,  J.  Mwabora,  M.  Rusu,  K.  Fostiropoulos,  M.  Lux-­‐Steiner  (2013).  Effect  of  Recombination  on  Series  Resistance  in  eta  Solar  Cell  Modified  with  In(OH)xSy  Buffer  Layer.  Int.  J.  Energy  Eng.,  3(3)183–189.  DOI:10.5923/j.ijee.20130303.09         (IPPS  KEN:02)    International  Journal  of  Fundamental  Physical  Sciences  Mulwa  B.M.,  Maina  D.M.,  Patel  J.  P.  (2013).  Radiological  analysis  of  suitability  of  Kitui  South  Limestone  for  use  as  building  material.  Int.  J.  Fund.  Phys.  Sci.,  3(2)  32-­‐35.  DOI:10.14331/ijfps.2013.330051.                         (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    International  Journal  of  Material  Science  C.O.  Ayieko,  R.J.  Musembi,  S.M.  Waita,  B.O.  Aduda,  P.K.  Jain  (2013).  Performance  of  TiO2/In(OH)iSj/  Pb(OH)xSy  Composite  ETA  Solar  Cell  Fabricated  from  Nitrogen  Doped  TiO2  Thin  Film  Window  Layer.  Int.  J.  Mat.  Eng.,  3(2)11-­‐16.  DOI:10.5923/j.ijme.20130302.01         (IPPS  KEN:02)                        International  Journal  of  Physics  M.M.  Rahman,  B.M.  Sonia,  M.K.  Das,  F.  Ahmed,  Md.  A.  Hossain,  D.  K.  Saha,  S.  Akhter  (2013).  Structural  and  Magnetization  Behaviors  of  Ni  Substituted  Li-­‐Mg  Ferrites.  Int.  J.  Phys.,  1(5)128-­‐132.   (IPPS  BAN:02)  DOI:10.12691/ijp-­‐1-­‐5-­‐6                              

 49  

Journal  of  Alloys  and  Compounds         2.390  (2.161)  Z.H.  Khan,  M.M.  Rahman,  S.S.  Sikder,  M.A.  Hakim,  D.K.  Saha  (2013).  Complex  Permeability  of  Fe-­‐Deficient  Ni-­‐Cu-­‐Zn  Ferrites,  Journal  of  Alloys  and  Compounds.  J  Alloys  Comp.,  548,  208-­‐215.     (IPPS  BAN:02)  DOI:10.1016/j.jallcom.2012.09.037                Journal  of  Bangladesh  Academy  of  Sciences  A.  Khan,  M.A.  Bhuiyan,  G.D.  Al-­‐Quaderi,  K.H.  Maria,  S.  Choudhury,  K.A.  Hossain,  S.  Akhter,  D.K.  Saha  (2013).  Dielectric  and  Transport  Properties  of  Zn-­‐Substituted  Cobalt  Ferrites.  J.  Bangl.  Acad.  Sci.,  37(1)73-­‐82.                       (IPPS  BAN:02)    Journal  of  Biomedical  Optics           2.881  (3.145)  Merdasa,  A.,  Brydegaard,  M.,  Svanberg,  S.,  Zoueu,  J.T.  (2013).  Staining-­‐free  malaria  diagnostics  by  multispectral  and  multimodality  light-­‐emitting-­‐diode  microscopy.  J.  Biomed.  Opt.,  18(3)1-­‐10.  DOI:  10.1117/1.JBO.18.3.036002               (IPPS  AFSIN)    Journal  of  Chemical  Engineering  and  Materials    G.  Kalonga,  G.K.  Chinyama,  O.  Munyati,  M.  Maaza  (2013).  Characterization  and  optimization  of  poly  (3-­‐hexylthiophene-­‐2,  5-­‐diyl)  (P3HT)  and  [6,  6]  phenyl-­‐C61-­‐  butyric  acid  methyl  ester  (PCBM)  blends  for  optical  absorption.  J.  Chem.  Eng.  Mat.,  4(7)93–102.  DOI:10.5897/JCEMS2013.0148   (IPPS  ZAM:01)    Journal  of  Cleaner  Production             3.398  (3.587)  Wamsler,  C.,  Brink,  E.,  Rivera,  C.  (2013).  Planning  for  climate  change  in  urban  areas:  from  theory  to  practice.  J.  Cleaner  Prod.,  50:68–81.  DOI:10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.12.008     (IPPS  NADMICA)    Journal  of  Crystal  Growth           1.552  (1.603)  C.O.  Chey,  O.  Nur,  M.  Willander  (2013).  Low  temperature  aqueous  chemical  growth,  structural,  and  optical  properties  of  Mn-­‐doped  ZnO  nanowires.  J.  Cryst.  Growth,  375:125–130.       (IPPS  CAM:01)  DOI:  10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2013.04.015                M.  Rahaman  and  D.K.  Saha  (2013).  Mineralogical  Investigation  of  Ancient  Morter  in  Bangladesh,  Achia  Khanom.  J.  Dept.  Archaeol.,  Jahangirnagar  Univ.,  18:103-­‐109.       (IPPS  BAN:02)    Journal  of  Environmental  Engineering  Yakub,  A.  Plappaly,  M.  Leftwich,  K.  Malatesta,  K.  C.  Friedman,  S.  Obwoya,  F.  Nyongesa,  A.  H.  Maiga  (2013).  Porosity,  flow  and  filtration  characteristics  of  frustrum-­‐shaped  ceramic  water  filters.  J.  Environ.  Eng.,  139:986–994.  DOI:  10.1061/(ASCE)EE.1943-­‐7870.0000669       (IPPS  KEN:02)    Journal  of  Geography  and  Geology  C.  Chuma,  D.J.  Hlatywayo,  J.  Zulu,  I.  Muchingami,  R.T.  Mashingaidze,  V.  Midzi  (2013).  Modelling  the  Sub-­‐surface  Geology  and  Groundwater  Occurrence  of  the  Matsheumhlope  Low  Yielding  Aquifer  in  Bulawayo  Urban,  Zimbabwe.  J.  Geogr.  Geol.,  5(3)158-­‐175.  DOI:  10.5539/jgg.v5n3p158     (IPPS  ZIM:01)    Journal  of  Hydrology             2.964  (3.654)  Hidalgo,  H.G.,  Amador,  J.A.,  Alfaro,  E.  &  Quesada,  B.  (2013).  Hydrological  Climate  Change  Projections  for  Central  America.  J.  Hydrol.,  495:94-­‐112.  DOI:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2013.05.004     (IPPS  NADMICA)    Journal  of  Materials  Science           2.163  (2.100)  D.S.  Manjura  Hoque,  C.  Srivastava,  N.  Venkatesha,  P.S.A.  Kumar,  K.  Chattopadhaya  (2013).  Synthesis  and  Characterization  of  Fe-­‐  and  Co-­‐Based  Ferrite  nanoparticles  and  Study  of  the  T1  and  T2  Relaxivity  of  Chit-­‐osan-­‐Coated  Particle.  J.  Mat.  Sci.,  48(2)812-­‐818.  DOI:  10.1007/s10853-­‐012-­‐6800-­‐9   (IPPS  BAN:02)    Journal  of  Physics:  Conference  Series  R.  Abir,  F.J.  Pettersen,  O.G.  Martinsen,  K.S.  Rabbani  (2013).  Effect  of  a  spherical  object  in  4  electrode  Focused  Impedance  Method  (FIM):  measurement  and  simulation.  J.  Phys.  Conf.  Ser.,  434(012009)1-­‐4.  DOI:  10.1088/1742-­‐6596/434/1/012009             (IPPS  BAN:04)    Journal  of  Scientific  Research  M.F.  Huq,  D.K.  Saha,  R.  Ahmed  and  Z.H.  Mahmood  (2013).  Ni-­‐Cu-­‐Zn  Ferrite  Research:  A  Brief  Review.  J.  Sci.  Res.,  5(2)215–233.  DOI:  10.3329/jsr.v5i212434           (IPPS  BAN:02)  

 50  

Journal  of  the  Department  of  Archaeology,  Jahangirnagar  University  A.  Khanom,  S.M.  Rahaman  and  D.K.  Saha  (2013).  Mineralogical  Investigation  of  Ancient  Morter  in  Bangladesh.  J.  Dept.  Archaeol.  Jahangirnagar  Univ.,  18:103-­‐109.       (IPPS  BAN:02)                        Journal  of  the  Ghana  Science  Association  H.H.E.  Jayaweera,  B.  Anderson,  M.J.  Eghan  (2013).  A  simple  polarized-­‐based  diffused  reflectance  colour  imaging  system,  J.  Ghana  Sci.  Assoc.,  14(1)82–93.           (IPPS  AFSIN)    Materials               2.247  (2.338)  K.  Khun,  Z.H.  Ibupoto,  M.S.  AlSalhi,  M.  Atif,  A.A.  Ansari  and  M.  Willander  (2013).  Fabrication  of  well-­‐aligned  ZnO  nanorods  using  a  composite  seed  layer  of  ZnO  nanoparticles  and  chitosan  polymer.  Materials,  6:4361–4374.  DOI:  10.3390/ma6104361             (IPPS  CAM:01)    Materials  Research  Bulletin             1.913  (2.141)  S.  Manjura  Hoque,  C.  Srivastava,  V.  Kumar,  N.  Venkatesha,  H.N.  Das,  D.K.  Saha  and  K.  Chattopadhaya  (2013).  Exchange-­‐Spring  Mechanism  of  Soft  and  Hard  Ferrite  Nanoparticles.  Mat.  Res.  Bull.  48:2871-­‐2877.  DOI:10.1016/j.materresbull.2013.04.009             (IPPS  BAN:02)    Materials  Sciences  and  Applications    R.  Musembi,  B.  Aduda,  J.  Mwabora,  M.  Rusu,  K.  Fostiropoulos,  M.  Lux-­‐Steiner  (2013).  Light  Soaking  Induced  Increase  in  Conversion  Efficiency  of  eta  Solar  Cell  Based  on  In(OH)xSy/Pb  (OH)xSy.  Mat.  Sci.  Appl.,  4:718–722.  DOI:10.4236/msa.2013.411090           (IPPS  KEN:02)    Materials  Sciences  in  Semiconductor  Processing       1.338  (1.264)  S.  Mlowe,  A.A.  Nejo,  V.S.R.  Rajasekhar  Pullabhotla,  E.B.  Mubofu,  F.N.  Ngassapa,  P.  O’Brien,  N.  Revaprasadu  (2013).  Lead  chalcogenides  stabilized  by  anacardic  acid.  Mat.  Sci.  Semiconduct.  Proc.,  16(2)263–268.  DOI:10.1016/j.mssp.2012.10.017               (IPPS  MSSEESA)    Microscopy    Md.M.  Haque,  Y.  Sato,  M.  Terauchi,  T.  Okazaki,  Y.  Iizumi  (2013).  Electron  diffraction  and  electron  energy-­‐loss  spectroscopy  studies  of  a  hybrid  material  composed  of  coronene  molecules  encapsulated  in  single-­‐walled  carbon  nanotubes.  Microscopy,  63:111-­‐117.  DOI:10.1093/jmicro/dft049   (IPPS  BAN:02)    Open  Journal  of  Clicinal  Diagnostics  Memeu  D.M.,  Kaduki  K.A.  Mjomba  A.C.K,  Muriuki  N.S.,  Gitonga  L.  (2013).  Detection  of  plasmodium  parasites  from  images  of  thin  blood  smears.  Open  J.  Clin.Diagn.,  3:183-­‐194.  DOI:10.4236/ojcd.2013.34034         (IPPS  KEN:04)           (IPPS  AFSIN)    Philosophical  Magazine             1.596  (1.173)  S.  Manjura  Hoque,  C.  Srivastava,  N.  Venkatesha,  P.  S.  A.  Kumar  and  K.  Chattopadhaya  (2013).  Super  Paramagnetic  Behaviour  and  T1,  T2  Relaxivity  of  ZnFe2O4  Nanoparticles  for  Magnetic  Resonance  Imaging.  Phil.  Magazine,  93(14)1771-­‐1783.  DOI:10.1080/14786435.2012.755271     (IPPS  BAN:02)    Radiation  Effects  and  Defects  in  Solids         0.502  (0.497)  Angeyo  K.H.  and  Golloch  A.  (2013).  Characterization  of  Sliding  Spark  Plasma  Source  for  Direct  Trace  Spectroanalysis.  Rad.  Eff.  Def.  Sol.,  168:176–187.           (IPPS  KEN:04)      Scholarly  Journal  of  Scientific  Research  and  Essay  Mulwa,  J.K.,  Mariita  N.O.  (2013).  A  comparative  analysis  of  gravity  and  microseismic  results  from  Arus-­‐Bogoria  geothermal  prospect,  Kenya.  Schol.  J.  Sci.  Res.  Ess.,  2(6)77-­‐84.     (IPPS  KEN:05)    Sensors                 1.953  (2.395)  Z.H.  Ibupoto,  K.  Khun,  V.Beni,  X.  Liu  and  M.  Willander  (2013).  Synthesis  of  novel  CuO  nanosheets  and  their  non-­‐enzymatic  glucose  sensing  applications.  Sensors,  13:7926–7938.  DOI:10.3390/s130607926      (IPPS  CAM:01)              

 51  

Solid  State  Ionics             2.046  (2.564)  Haro-­‐González  P.,  Karlsson  M.,  Gaita  S.  M.,  Knee  C.S.,  Bettinelli  M.  (2013).  Eu3+  as  a  luminescent  probe  for  the  local  structure  of  trivalent  dopant  ions  in  barium  zirconate-­‐based  proton  conductors.  Solid  State  Ionics,  247–248:94–97.  DOI:  10.1016/j.ssi.2013.06.008         (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Spectrochimica  Acta  B             3.141  (3.047)  Mukhono  P.M.,  Angeyo  K.H.,  Dahayem-­‐Massop  A.  and  Kaduki  A.K.  (2013).  Laser  Induced  Breakdown  Spectroanalysis  and  Characterization  of  Environmental  Matrices  Utilizing  Multivariate  Chemometrics.  Spectrochim.  Acta  B,  87:81–85.  DOI:10.1016/j.sab.2013.05.031.   (IPPS  KEN:04)    Tanzania  Journal  of  Earth  Science  Lupogo,  K.,  Ferdinand,  R.W.,  Bujulu,  P.  (2013).  Qualitative  Microzonation  -­‐  A  case  study  for  Dodoma  urban  area,  Central  Tanzania.  Tanz.  J.  Earth  Sci.,  2:55-­‐62.           (IPPS  ESARSWG)    Ferdinand,  R.W.,  Arvidson,  R.  (2013).  The  influence  of  local  topographic  relief  on  regional  stress:  an  example  from  the  Rukwa  rift.  Tanz.  J.  Earth  Sci.,  2:91-­‐107.         (IPPS  ESARSWG)    Water  Resources  Research           3.149  (3.448)  Guerrero,  J-­‐L.,  Westerberg,  I.K.,  Halldin,  S.,  Lundin,  L.C.,  Xu,  C.Y.  (2013).  Exploring  the  hydrological  robustness  of  model-­‐parameter  values  with  alpha  shapes.  Wat.  Res.  Res.,  49(10)6700-­‐6715.  DOI:  10.1002/wrcr.20533               (IPPS  NADMICA)        Books,  Book  Chapters,  Popular  Publications,  Technical  Reports,  etc.      K.S.  Rabbani  and  I.  Lechner  (2013).  Cleaning  water  with  a  copper  plate.  Rural  21.  The  International  Journal  for  Rural  Development,  epublication  6  May.           (IPPS  BAN:04)  www.rural21.com/english/news/detail/article/cleaning-­‐water-­‐with-­‐a-­‐copper-­‐plate-­‐0000697    Mulwa  J.K.,  Kimata  F.,  Duong  N.A.  (2013).  Chapter  19  –  Seismic  hazard.  In:  P.  Paron,  D.O.  Olago  and  C.T.  Omuto  (Eds.),  Developments  in  Earth  Surface  Processes.  Volume  16.  Kenya:  A  Natural  Outlook  Geo-­‐Environmental  Resources  and  Hazards,  pp.  267-­‐292.  Amsterdam:  Elsevier  B.V.,  ISBN  13:  978-­‐0-­‐444-­‐59559-­‐1.                   (IPPS  KEN:05)                        S.  Waita,  J.  Simiyi,  R.  Misembi  A.  Ogacho  (2013).  Promoting  photovoltaic  energy  in  Kenya  through  training.  e-­‐EPS,  Facts  and  info  from  the  European  Physcal  Society  News,  epublication  25  May.  www.epsnews.eu/2013/03/photovoltaic-­‐energy-­‐in-­‐kenya/           (IPPS  KEN:02)        

                                   The  physics  research  group  BAN:04,  at  the  Department  of  Biomedical  Physics  &  Technology,  University  of  Dhaka,  Bangladesh.  (Courtesy  of  IPPS  BAN:04)  

 52  

5.5     Academic  theses    

The  entries  are  given  essentially  as  reported  to  ISP.  “Sandwich”  (Sandw.)  theses  are  by  student  with  intermittent  visits  to  a  collaborating  supervisor  in  another  country.  “Local“  theses  are  by  students  being  trained  at  the  home  university.  (F  =  female;  M=  male).  Summary  in  Table  17.  

Table  17.  Summary  of  the  111  academic  thesis  examined  in  2013,  for  PhD  (35)  and  other  graduates  (76;  MSc/MPhil/Licentiate)  in  chemistry  (IPICS),  mathematics  (IPMS)  and  physics  (IPPS).  Sandwich  type  training  (Sandw.)  or  Local  training  is  indicated,  and  gender  of  graduates.  (F  =  female;  M  =  male).     Africa   Asia   L.  Am.   Total  

Sandw.   Local   Sandw.   Local   Sandw.   Local   Sandw.   Local  F   M   F   M   F   M   F   M   F   M   F   M   F   M   F   M  

PhD                                    IPICS   2   2   4   9         1           2   2   4   10  IPMS   1   9     1                   1   9     1  IPPS     1     1         3     1         2     4  Total   3   12   4   11         4     1       3   13   4   15  

 

Other                                  IPICS   1     7   23         7           1     7   30  IPMS       4   16                       4   16  IPPS       1   11         5     1         1   1   16  Total   1     12   50         12     1       1   1   12   62      5.5.1     PhD  Theses    Bangladesh  Md  Jahangir  Alam  (M).  Calculation  the  accuracy  and  quality  assurance  of  computer  aided  radiation  therapy  planning.                 (IPPS  BAN:04,  Local)    Pankoj  Kumar  Sarkar  (M).  Isolation  of  antidiabetic  and  other  bioactive  components  from  some  medicinal  plants  available  in  northern  part  of  Bangladesh.         (IPICS  ANRAP,  Local)    Robiul  Islam  (M).  Effect  of  annealing  temperature  on  complex  permeability  and  structural  preperties  of  Nanocrystalline  alloy.                 (IPPS  BAN:02,  Local)    Zakir  Hossain  (M).  Electromagnetic  properties  of  iron  deficient  Ni-­‐Cu-­‐Zn  ferrites  and  the  influence  of  additives  as  sintering  aid.             (IPPS  BAN:02,  Local)                Botswana  Samson  Famuyiwa  (M).  Homoisoflavonoids  from  the  inter-­‐bulb  surfaces  of  Scilla  nervosa  subsp.  rigidifolia.                   (IPICS  NABSA,  Local)    Burkina  Faso  Bénéwindé  Joseph  Sawadogo  (M).  Contribution  des  termites  dans  l’émission  des  gaz  a  effet  de  serre  (méthane  et  gaz  carbonique)  en  zone  sahélienne:  cas  du  Burkina  Faso.                       (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    Brahima  Sorgho  (M).  Caractérisation  et  valorisation  de  quelques  argiles  du  Burkina  Faso:  appl-­‐ication  au  traitement  des  eaux  et  aux  géomatériaux  de  construction.       (IPICS  BUF:02,  Sandw.)    Gaoussou  Camara  (M).  Conception  d’un  système  de  veille  épidémiologique  à  base    d’ontologies:  application  à  la  schistosomiase  au  Sénégal.         (IPMS  BURK:01,  Sandw.)      Ibrahim  NONKANE  (M).  Géométrie  des  modules  et  des  modules  différentiels  liés  aux    représentations  du  groupe  symétrique.             (IPMS  BURK:01,  Sandw.)  

 53  

Ilboudo  Ousmane  (M).  Flavonoïdes  de  Mentha  piperita  (Lamiaceae):  analyse  par  spectrométrie  de  masse  et  évaluation  de  propriétés  antifongiques.                                 (IPICS  BUF:01,  Local)    Kyelem  Bila  Adolphe  (M).  Contribution  à  l’étude  d’existence  de  solutions  périodiques  pour  une    classe  de  problèmes  d’évolution  à  retard  et  applications.  December.     (IPMS  BURK:01,  Sandw.)      Léon  W.  Nitiema  (M).  Composés  phénoliques  issus  des  tourteaux  de  karité  dans  l’eau:  substan-­‐ces  polluantes  à  éliminer  ou  à  utiliser  comme  agents  désinfection?       (IPICS  RA  Biotech,  Local)    S.  Tiendrebéogo  (F).  Evaluation  des  propriétés  antifongiques  des  plantes.   (IPICS  BUF:01,  Local)    Victorien  Fourtoua  KONANE  (M).  Etude  de  Systèmes  Dynamiques  :  Modélisation  de  batteries  non  rechargeables.                 (IPMS  BURK:01,  Sandw.)    Zongo  Duni  Yegbonoma  Frédéric  (M).  Etude  de  problèmes  anisotropiques  et  d’équations  quasirelativistes  de  type  Choquard.  et  elliptiques  non  linéaires  sous  des  conditions  assez  générales  sur  les  données.                     (IPMS  BURK:01,  Sandw.)    Cameroon  A.  Djoumessi  (F).  Antimicrobial  terpenoids  from  two  plants:  Donella  ubanguiensis  (De  Wild.)  Aubr.  (Sapot-­‐aceae)  and  Duboscia  macrocarpa  Bocq.  (Tiliaceae)  &  Cytotoxicity  of  semi  synthetic  acetal  from  vicinal  diol  triterpenes  by  one-­‐pot  reaction  cleavage  followed  by  lactolization.     (IPICS  NABSA,  Sandwich)    P.Ango  (M).  Chemical  Investigation  and  antimicrobial  activity  of  two  medicinal  plants  of  Cameroon  be-­‐longing  Moraceae  family:  Trilepisium  Madagascariense  and  Artocarpus  Communis.  Total  synthesis  of  2’,4’,4-­‐Trimethoxychalcone  using  adol  condensation  free  solvent  reaction.   (IPICS  NABSA,  Sandwich)    Ethiopia  Berhanu  Wondimu  (M).  Polymer-­‐Based  Electrolyte  and  Cathodes  for  Batteries  and  Fuel  Cells.                     (IPICS  ETH:01,  Local)    Maereg  Amare  (M).  Conducting  Polymer-­‐Modified  Electrodes  for  the  Electrochemical  Determination  of  Alkaloids  and  Pesticides.               (IPICS  ETH:01,  Local)    Solomon  Mehretie  (M).  Conducting  Polymer  and  Zeolite-­‐Modified  Carbon  Electrodes  for  the  Determination  of  Drugs  and  Biological  Fluids.         (IPICS  ETH:01,  Local)    Honduras  José-­‐Luis  Guerrero  (M).  Robust  Water  Balance  Modeling  with  Uncertain  Discharge  and  Precipi-­‐tation  Data:  Computational  Geometry  as  a  New  Tool.           (IPPS  NADMICA,  Sandw.)    Ivory  Cost  Tokou  Z.G.  Stephane  (M).  Development  of  strategies  for  malaria  studies.     (IPPS  AFSIN,  Local)    Kenya  Akalla  Hosea  Miima  (M).  Investigation  of  in  vivo  and  in  vitro  antiplasmodial  activities  of  some  flavonoids,  flavonoid/flavonoid  and  flavonoid/amodiaquine  combinations.     (IPICS  KEN:02,  Local)    Hannington  Tuinomuhwezi  (M).  Antiplasmodial  and  antioxidant  compounds  from  Erythrina  and  Derris  species.                   (IPICS  KEN:02,  Local)    Hellen  Nyambura  Kariuki  (F).  Antinociceptive  activities  of  some  medicinal  plants  using  animal  models).                   (IPICS  KEN:02,  Local)    Joice  Njagi  (F).  Analysis  of  pesticide  residues  in  water,  sediments  and  vegetables  from  the  Upper  Tana  River  Catchment.               (IPICS  ANCAP,  Local)                     (IPICS  KEN:01,  Local)        

 54  

Mali  Issiaka  Traoré  (M).  Etude  et  caractérisation  des  fonctions  de  réponse  des  Détecteurs  Solides  de  Traces  Nucléaires:  Application  à  la  dosimétrie  radon  et  neutron.         (IPPS  MAL:01,  Sandw.)    Mauritania  Cheikh  A.T.  Niang  (M).  Vers  plus  d'automatisation  dans  la  construction  de  systèmes  médiateurs  pour  le  web  sémantique:  une  application  des  logiques  de  description.       (IPMS  BURK:01,  Sandw.)    Elhafed  Cheikh  ould  Mohamed  (M).  Équations  d’Euler-­‐Poisson-­‐Darboux  à  conditions  modifiées  dans  des  espaces  Riemanniens  de  courbures  constantes.         (IPMS  BURK:01,  Sandw.)    Senegal  DIAGNE  Mamadou  Lamine  (M).  Modélisation  mathématique  de  la  dynamique  de  prolifération  du  Typha.                   (IPMS  BURK:01,  Sandw.)    Seck  Cheikh,  (M).  Contrôles  et  Etudes  de  Singularités  pour  l’opérateur  du  Bilaplacien.                       (IPMS  BURK:01,  Local)    TENDENG  Léna  (F).  Etude  de  modèles  de  transmission  de  la  schistosomiase:  Analyse  mathematicque,  reconstruction  des  variables  d’état  et  estimation  des  paramètres.         (IPMS  BURK:01,  Sandw.)    South  Africa  Dezzline  Odingo  (F).  Polymer  based  electrospun  nanofibers  as  diagnostic  probes  for  the  detection  of  toxic  metals  in  water.  Rhodes  University,  South  Africa.         (IPICS  SEANAC,  Local)    Tanzania  Nadja  Stadlinger  (F).  Pesticides  in  Coastal  Tanzania:  Management,  policy  and  concerns  for  human  health  and  environment.               (IPICS  ANCAP,  Sandwich)    Uganda  Geoffrey  Ismail  Mirumbe  (M).  Distribution  solutions  to  ordinary  differential  equations  with  polynomial  coefficients  on  the  real  line.             (IPMS  EAUMP,  Sandw.)  

5.5.2     Other  Postgraduate  Theses    Theses  regard  MSc  graduations  unless  otherwise  indicated  (MPhil  or  Licentiate  exams).    Bangladesh  Abdullah  Al  Imran  (M).  Analysis  of  residual  amount  of  DDTs  in  different  parts  of  Ruhi  and  Catla  fish  samples  from  Chalan  Beel  area  and  fatty  acid  composition  of  the  fish  oil.     (IPICS  BAN:04,  Local)        Enayet  Hossain  (M).  Effect  of  annealing  condition  on  the  structural  and  magneticproperties  of  nanocrystalline  finemet  alloy  with  composition  Fe74Cu1.5Nb2.5Si12B10.     (IPPS  BAN:02,  Local)    Hanifur  Rahman  (M).  Studies  of  fatty  acids  composition  change  in  mustard  oil  heated  with  (vanillic  and  protocatechuic  acid).                 (IPICS  BAN:04,  Local)    Md.  Mehedi  Hasan  (M).  Structural  and  magnetic  properties  of  Co1-­‐xZnxFe2O4  (nano  ferrite)  with  the  variation  of  the  particle  size  from  Nano-­‐scale  to  Micro-­‐scale.       (IPPS  BAN:02,  Local)    Md.  Shamim  (M).  Analysis  of  Free  Sugar  and  Dietary  Fiber  of  two  different  varieties  of  mango  (Langra  and  Amrupali).                 (IPICS  BAN:04,  Local)    Md.  Tushan  Shahdat  (M).  Analysis  of  Free  Sugar  and  Dietary  Fiber  of  two  different  varieties  of  mango  (Himsagar  and  Ashwinibhog).             (IPICS  BAN:04,  Local)    Muhammad  Shamim  Al  Mamun  (M).  Analysis  of  residual  amount  of  DDTs  in  Rupchanda  fish  (pomfret)  and  fatty  acid  composition  of  fish  oil.           (IPICS  BAN:04,  Local)  

 55  

Radwan  Ebna  Noor  (M).  Study  of  residual  amount  of  DDTs  in  Koral  (Lates  calcarifer)  fish  and  it’s  fatty  acid  composition.               (IPICS  BAN:04,  Local)    Ratan  Krishna  Halder  (M).  Study  of  Structural  and  Magnetic  Properties  of  Nanocrystalline  (Fe0.95Co0.05)73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9  Alloy.  (MPhil)         (IPPS  BAN:02,  Local)    Samir  Kumer  Saha  (M).  Annealing  time  and  temperature  dependent  structural  and  magnetic  properties  study  of  nano  crystalline  Fe75.5Si13.5Cu1Nb1B9.         (IPPS  BAN:02,  Local)    Suvendu  Kumar  Bahadur  (M).  Study  the  effect  of  structural,  electrical  transport  and  magnetic  properties  of  Ni-­‐Cu-­‐Zn  ferrites.  (MPhil)             (IPPS  BAN:02,  Local)    Topu  Kumar  Bhoumik  (M).  Studies  of  fatty  acids  composition  change  in  soya  bean  oil  heated  with  protocatechuic  and  vanilic  acid.             (IPICS  BAN:04,  Local)    Burkina  Faso  ABDOULAYE  Mamoudou  Oubayou  (M).  Affections  pulmonaires  d’origine  parasitaire  et  fongique  dans  quelques  centres  médicaux  de  la  ville  de  Ouagadougou  notamment  au  centre  hospitalier  universitaire  Yalgado  Ouédraogo.               (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    AL-­‐LAMADINE  Mahamat  (M).  Analyse  des  paramètres  physico  physico-­‐chimiques  et  microbiol-­‐ogiques  des  variétés  de  mangue  au  Tchad  pour  une  meilleure  stabilisation  des  produits  de  transformation  en  vue  leur  valorisation.                 (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    BATIONO  Fabrice  (M).  Evaluation  des  paramètres  du  milieu  de  culture  et  de  l’effet  du  stockage  sur  les  teneurs  en  ß-­‐Carotènes  et  en  α-­‐tocophérol  de  la  spiruline.         (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    BATIONO  Jean  Fidèle  (M).  Evaluation  de  la  quantité  d’aflatoxine  B1  et  d’ochratoxine  A  dans  la  bière  de  sorgho  (dolo)  à  Ouagadougou.             (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    COMPAORE  Idrissa  (M)  Statut  nutritionnel  et  immunologique  des  patients  adultes  infectés  par  le  VIH  admis  dans  le  Centre  Médical  Oasis  de  Ouagadougou.       (IPICS  RABiotech,  MSc)    COMPAORE  Muller  (M).  Clonage  et  expression  de  la  protéine  GRA  16  de  Neospora  caninum.                     (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    COMPAORE  Wind-­‐Yam  Josias  (M).  Recherche  et  isolement  de  bactéries  productrices  de  molécules  bioactives  à  partir  de  deux  aliments  (Soumbala  et  bikalga):  cas  des  bactériocines  et  des  peptides  NRPS  (Non  Ribosomal  Peptide  synthetase).           (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    DIESSANA  Arthur  (M).  Optimisation  de  l’extraction  aqueuse  des  anthocyanes  d’Hibiscus  sabdariffa  L.                     (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    KIMA  Donatien  (M).  Mise  au  point  d’un  protocole  d’immunophénotypage  des  leucémies  aiguës  Ouagadougou.                 (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    KONATE  J.  (M).  Evolution  au  cours  du  temps  de  l’excrétion  d’ARN  VIH-­‐1  dans  le  lait  maternel  des  femmes  infectées  par  le  VIH-­‐1  au  sein  de  l’essai  ANRS12174,  Ouagadougou,  Burkina.  (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    KOUYATE  Boubacar  Mohamed  (M).  Intérêt  pharmacologique  du  jus  de  mangoustan:  Composition  en  xanthone  et  activités  antioxydantes.             (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    Mahaman  Malou  Mouctari  Ousseini  (M).  Etude  comparée  de  la  valeur  nutritionnelle  de  la  spiruline  (Spirulina  platensis  Nordtsedt)  au  niveau  de  trois  fermes  du  Burkina  Faso.   (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    OUEDRAOGO  A.  Antoinette  (F).  Évaluation  de  la  contamination  par  Salmonella  enterica  et  Aspergilus  spp  des  stocks  de  sésame  destine  a  l’exportation  au  Burkina  Faso.     (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    

 56  

OUEDRAOGO  Adama  (M).  Modelling  effect  of  electromagnetic  waves  on  photovoltaic  solar  cells.                     (IPPS  BUF:01)    OUEDRAOGO  G.  Noël  (M).  La  cysticercose  porcine  et  bovine  à  Ouagadougou  et  ses  environs:  prévalence  et  connaissances,  Attitudes  et  pratiques  des  populations.       (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    OUOBA  Jean  Bienvenue  (M).  Caractérisation  des  virus  Influenza  Humains  circulant  pendant  la  période  post-­‐pandémique  2012  au  Burkina  Faso.             (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    SAMANDOULOUGOU,  S.  (M).  Risques  pour  la  santé  publique  liés  à  la  présence  des  résidus  d’antibiotiques  dans  la  viande  consommée  par  la  population  de  Ouagadougou.     (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    SOMDA  Reine  Désirée  (F).  Étude  comparative  de  la  qualité  microbiologique  et  de  l’activité  antioxydante  de  la  spiruline  (Spirulina  platensis  norsdstedt)  produite  sous  abri  et  hors  abri  au  Burkina  Faso.                     (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    TRAORE  Désiré  (M).  Valorisation  des  déchets  de  cuisine  par  production  de  bioénergie  (biogaz)  au  Burkina  Faso.                 (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    ZONGO  S.  Roukiatou  (F).  Etude  des  infections  génitales  basses  à  Streptococcus  agalactiae  chez  les  femmes  de  la  ville  de  Ouagadougou,  Burkina  Faso:  aspect  bactériologique.     (IPICS  RABiotech,  Local)    Youssouf  Djibo  (M).  Study  and  dimensioning  solar  water  heater.       (IPPS  BUF:01,  Local)    Ethiopia  Abraham  Esetemariam  (M).  Polymer  translocation  through  nanochannels:  a  two-­‐dimensional  Monte  Carlo  simulation  study.                 (IPPS  ETH:01,  Local)    Ashenafi  Teklay  (M).  Evolutionary  Algorithms  for  Solving  Multilevel  Programming  Problems.                     (IPMS  ETH:01,  Local)    Berhanu  Gebrehaha  (M).  r-­‐Bell  Numbers  for  Graphs.         (IPMS  ETH:01,  Local)    Fikre  Jida  (M).  Field  driven  translocation  of  a  polymer  into  a  circular  cavity:  a  two-­‐dimensional  Monte  Carlo  simulation  study.               (IPPS  ETH:01,  Local)    Habtu  Abreha  (M).  Physicochemical  study  of  stingless  bee  honey.       (IPICS  ALNAP,  Local)        Hulugirgesh  Degefu  (F).  Electrochemical  study  of  histamine  at  lignin-­‐modified  glassy  carbon  electrode.                   (IPICS  ETH:01,  Local)    Million  Getasetgn  (M).  Fate  of  Cathinone  in  Khat  Leaves.       (IPICS  ALNAP,  Local)  Mulu  Alemayeu  (M).  On  Prevalence  Dependent  Epidemiological  Models.                     (IPMS  ETH:01,  Local)    Sileshi  Sintayehu  (M).  Mathematical  Modeling  and  analysis  of  the  transmission  of  Drug-­‐Resistant  TB  in  Ethiopia.                 (IPMS  ETH:01,  Local)    Taame  Gezae  (M).  Two  Long  Chain  Alcohols  from  Leaves  of  Moringa  stenopetala.                           (IPICS  ALNAP,  Local)    Temesgen  Debas  (M).  Impacts  of  Behavior  modification  in  the  optimal  intervention  for  controlling  the  transmission  of  tuberculosis.             (IPMS  ETH:01,  Local)    Tsegu  Kiros  (M).  Cathinone  Level  Determination  in  Khat  Leaves  by  Quantitative  NMR  Methods.                       (IPICS  ALNAP,  Local)    Yeniesil  Temare  (M).  Adsorption  of  a  single  polymer  chain  on  rough  surfaces:  A  Monte  Carlo  study.                     (IPPS  ETH:01,  Local)  

 57  

Ghana  Angela Gyemfa  Akyea  (F).  Monitoring  Shelf  Life  of  Three  Cultivars  of  Watermelon  (Citrullus  lanatus,  Cucurbitaceae)  using  a  Contructed  Led-­‐Based  Optical  System  (Ledos).     (IPPS  AFSIN,  Local)    Guatemala  Estuardo  Guinea  Barrientos  (M).  Towards  Integrated  Flood  Management  in  Guatemala.  (Licentiate)                     (IPPS  NADMICA,  Sandw.)    Kenya  George  N.  Wanyama  (M).  Assessment  of  Organochlorine  Pesticides  Residues  in  Water  and  Sediments  from  Mutoini,  Nairobi  and  Kangemi  Dams  in  the  Nairobi  River  Basin.     (IPICS  ANCAP,  Local)                     (IPICS  KEN:01,  Local)    Mannase  Kitui  (M).  Design  of  TiO2  based  multilayer  optical  filters.     (IPPS  KEN:03,  Local)    Michael  K.  Rotich  (M).  Dose  Conversion  Factors  for  a  Target  Close  to  Semi-­‐Infinite  Source  of  Gamma  Radiation.                   (IPPS  KEN:01/2,  Local)    Mugo  Fredrick  Muriithi  (M).  Determination  of  Soil  Physiochemical  Composition  and  Use  of  MIR  to  predict  Soil  Properties  of  Mount  Kenya  forest.           (IPICS  KEN:01,  Local)    Rachel  Njogu  (F).  Foliar  Fertilizer  (NPK)  Leaf  Nutrient  Uptake  of  Tea  (Camellia  Sinesis)  Growing  in  Highlands  of  Kenya.               (IPICS  KEN:01,  Local)    Stanley  Mule  Muema  (M).  Phytochemical  investigation  of  the  root  bark  of  Teclea  trichocarpa  (Rutaceae)  for  antihelminthic  activity.               (IPICS  KEN:02,  Local)    Trizah  Milugo  Koyi  (F).  Bioassay-­‐guided  phytochemical  investigation  of  Rauwolfia  caffra,  Ozoroa  insignis,  Syzygium  guineense,  Tylophora  sylvatica  and  Ozoroa  insignis  for  their  anti-­‐tumor  properties.                       (IPICS  KEN:02,  Local)    Vincent  Waita  Kivaya  (M).  Black  Carbon,  Trace  Element  and  Particulate  Matter  Levels  in  the  Ambient  Air  at  Jomo  Kenyatta  International  Airport,  Nairobi,  Kenya.         (IPPS  KEN:01/2,  Local)    Rwanda  Byukusenge  Beatrice  (F).  Computational  Market  Dynamics  Simulations  of  the  New  Zealand  Electricity  Spot  price.                 (IPMS  EAUMP,  Local)    Eustache  NSHIMYUMUREMYI  (M):  Representation  Theory  for  the  Lie  Algebra  sl  (2,  C).                     (IPMS  EAUMP,  Local)  Haguma  Gratien  (M).  Fuzzy  Measure  in  selection  of  important  features  in  medical  diagnosis.                     (IPMS  EAUMP,  Local)    Ngoga  Bob  (M).  Value  at  Risk  Estimation,  a  GARCH-­‐EVT-­‐Copula  Approach.                     (IPMS  EAUMP,  Local)    Thomas  BIZIMANA  (M).  Explicit  Estimators  of  the  Parameters  in  a  Multivariate  Normal  Distribution  when  the  Covariance  Matrix  is  Banded  -­‐  A  Simulation  Study.       (IPMS  EAUMP,  Local)    Senegal  Abdoulaye  Diallo  (M).  Modélisation  numérique  du  couplage  hydromécanique  en  milieu  poreux  déformable.                   (IPMS  BURK:01,  Local)    Awa  Laye  Dia  (F).  Graph  Mining,  étude  de  la  puissance  de  la  représentation  des  données  et  état  de  l’art.                    (IPMS  BURK:01,  Local)    Bass  Seck  (M).  Mise  à  jour  automatique  d’ontologie  basée  sur  les  motifs  frequents.                           (IPMS  BURK:01,  Local)    

 58  

Ismaïla  A.  Ndiaye  (M).  Développement  du  module  Gestion  Administratif  et  Financière  de  SIMENS.                       (IPMS  BURK:01,  Local)    Monique  Diop  (F).  Conception  et  développement  d’un  portail  web  d’informations  sanitaires  et  de  prise  de  rendez-­‐vous  en  ligne  pour  les  patients.             (IPMS  BURK:01,  Local)    Ndèye  Ngom  (M).  Implémentation  du  module  Consultation  de  SIMENS.   (IPMS  BURK:01,  Local)    Ousseynou  Ndiaye  (M).  Modélisation  et  simulation  numérique  de  l'écoulement  du  pétrole  à  l'intérieur  d'un  réservoir  naturel.                 (IPMS  BURK:01,  Local)    S.  Gueye  (F).  Implémentation  du  module  Hospitalisation  de  SIMENS.   (IPMS  BURK:01,  Local)    Youssou  Mbaye  (M).  Etude  mathématique  de  quelques  problèmes  de  la  dynamique  de  l’atmosphère.                       (IPMS  BURK:01,  Local)    South  Africa  Mamello  Mohale  (F).  Exploring  the  role  of  biomarkers  as  health  indicators.     (IPICS  SEANAC,  Sandw.)    Tanzania  Alinanuswe  Mwakalesi  (M).  The  potential  of  Terminalia  catappa  seed  oil  extract  as  a  green  corrosion  inhibitor  for  carbon  steel  in  sea  water.           (IPPS  MSSEESA,  Local)    Samwel  Bernard  (M).  The  effect  of  target  composition  on  optical  constants  of  DC  sputtered  ZnO:Al  thin  films.                     (IPPS  MSSEESA,  Local)    Watson  Levens  (M).  Mathematical  Modelling  of  co-­‐  application  of  Long  Lasting  Insecticidal  Nets  and  Insecticides  Zooprophylaxis  Against  the  Resilience  Anopheles  Arabiensis  for  Effective  Malaria  Prevention.                 (IPMS  EAUMP,  Local)    Zambia  Daniel  Chilukusha  (M).  Study  of  Nickel-­‐Germanium  Interactions  in  Lateral  Diffusion  Couples  and  Thin  Films.                     (IPPS  ZAM:01,  Local)  

Zimbabwe  Sithatchisiwe  Moyo  (F).  In  vivo  Screening  of  Aminoquinolines  with  in  vitro  activity  against  Plasmodium  falciparum  and  investigation  of  in  vivo  drug-­‐herb  interactions.  (MPhil)   (IPICS  AiBST,  Local)    

                     The  Light  Beam  Induced  Current  (LBIC)  set-­‐up  for  solar  cell  characterization,  at  Department  of  Physics,  University  of  Nairobi,  Kenya.  (Courtesy  of  IPPS  KEN:03)

 59  

SECTION  6:  EXAMPLES  OF  APPLICATIONS  AND  IMPACT  

 

6.1     Examples  of  research  findings  

Bangladesh     (Environmental  chemistry)  Earlier  years,  fresh  water  fish  samples  have  been  analyzed  for  the  presence  of  DDT  and  its  metabolites  (DDTs).  In  2013,  two  sea  fishes  popular  as  food  have  been  analyzed.  DDTs  were  found  in  both  species  but  in  much  lower  amounts  than  in  fresh  water  fish.     (IPICS  BAN:04)    A  method  for  determination  of  PAHs  in  water  samples  was  set  up  and  water  samples  collected  from  tap,  ground  and  pond  water  from  Dhaka  city  were  analyzed.  Anthracene  and  phenanthrene  were  identified  in  some  of  the  ground  water  samples.     (IPICS  BAN:04)    Burkina  Faso   (Water  chemistry)  It  is  urgent  to  make  potable  arsenic  contaminated  ground  water  in  northern  Burkina  Faso.  Collaboration  with  Prof.  Ingmar  Persson  (Dept.  Chemistry,  SLU,  Uppsala)  enabled  the  implem-­‐entation  of  a  treatment  design  using  granular  ferric  hydroxide  (GFH).  Mini  columns  were  tested  to  investigate  the  removal  of  arsenic  from  contaminated  water  under  different  pore  volumes.  This  work  was  made  possible  through  the  participation  of  a  MFS  student.   (IPICS  BUF:02)       (Clay  properties)  Fields  studies  for  collection  of  representative  clay  samples  were  carried  out.  The  samples  were  character-­‐ized  regarding  their  structure  and  morphology  in  the  research  groups  of  Prof.  Philippe  Blanchart  in  Limoges  (France)  and  of  Prof.  Ingmar  Persson  (SLU,  Sweden),  respectively.  Qualitative  mineralogical  characterization  of  the  clays  by  XRD  revealed  that  some  of  the  clays  contain  montmorillonite,  quartz,  albite,  illite,  kaolinite,  goethite  and  orthose.  The  adsorption  and  ion  exchange  properties  of  these  clay  samples  were  elucidated  by  use  of  solution  chemistry  analytical  methods.    (IPICS  BUF:02)    Kenya   (Drug  development)  One  of  the  methylated  flavonoids  of  Dodonaea  angustifolia  has  been  shown  to  have  mono-­‐ammonium  oxidase  (MAO)  activity.  It  may  therefore  have  a  potential  to  be  used  to  formulate  a  drug  that  can  control  moods.                       (IPICS  KEN:02)    Zambia   (Electrochemical  sensors)  Design,  device  construction,  and  investigation  of  sensing  characteristics  of  the  polymer  films  continued.  A  carbon  monoxide  chemical  sensor  was  designed  that  consisted  of  a  test  chamber  connected  to  a  digital  meter.  Carbon  monoxide  gas  was  introduced  into  the  sensor  and  the  response  monitored  over  a  specified  period.  The  device  was  found  to  respond  instantaneously  to  varying  concentrations  carbon  monoxide  and  it  was  observed  that  the  interaction  process  was  reversible.         (IPICS  ZAM:01)    Zimbabwe   (Drug  development)  Enantiomer  specific  CYP1A2  might  metabolize  PZQ  (praziquantel,  to  rid  trematodes  and  tapeworms  para-­‐sitic  to  humans,  especially  in  the  treatment  of  schistosomiasis)  in  an  enantiomer  manner.  These  data  will  be  used  in  efforts  to  come  up  with  a  pediatric  formulation  of  drugs.         (IPICS  AiBST)    Results  from  pharmacogenetics  on  efavirez  (used  along  with  other  medications  to  treat  HIV  infection)  have  been  reanalysed  (PCA  approch)  which  gave  a  more  specific  dosing  guideline.   (IPICS  AiBST)    AiBST  work  during  the  mass  drug  administration  (MDA),  where  millions  of  children  where  treated  for  schistosomiasis  (bilhazia),  conducuted  a  nested  study  that  measured  the  burden  of  infection  in  390  children.  The  results  clearly  showed  the  dramatic  effect  of  the  MDA  program  as  it  resulted  in  reduction  of  infection  rates  from  50-­‐60%  to  as  low  as  5%  in  the  selected  sites.  These  findings  are  going  to  have  an  impact  on  the  future  strategic  plans  of  the  MDA  program.         (IPICS  AiBST)    

 60  

6.2     Examples  of  influence  on  policy  or  practices    

Actual  changes  as  a  result  of  ISP  support  to  Research  Groups  and  Scientific  Networks  are  difficult  to  identify  in  the  yearly  follow  up.  However,  there  are  several  opportunities  for  policy  influence  reported.  The  entries  are  given  essentially  as  reported  to  ISP.    Bangladesh   (Food  security)  The  Bangladesh  Ministry  of  Agriculture  appointed  Prof.  Nilufar  Nahar  as  Convener  of  the  Food  Safety  sub-­‐committee  to  make  recommendations  about  allowable  limit  of  chemicals  that  are  used  in  agricultural  products,  storage,  and  processed  foods.                 (IPICS  BAN:04)    Botswana   (Plant  products)  Prof.  Yeboah’s  research  on  oils  of  plant  origin  has  led  to  interaction  with  the  Dept.  Energy  Affairs  in  Botswana,  and  with  a  Women’s  Cooperative  group  at  Lerala  in  the  north.  This  inter-­‐action  has  resulted  in  Prof.  Yeboah  being  invited  to  become  a  member  of  a  research  team  from  Botswana  and  Japan  to  work  on  the  development  of  jatropha  oil  for  the  production  of  biodiesel.       (IPICS  NABSA)    Burkina  Faso   (Research  funding)  In  Dec.  2012,  the  research  group  was  contacted  by  Fonrid  (Fonds  National  pour  la  Recherche,  l’Innovation  et  le  Développement),  the  national  authority  for  Research,  Development  and  Innov-­‐ation  of  the  Ministry  of  Research  and  Innovation.  Fonrid  provides  financial  support  to  activities  that  have  an  impact  on  the  development  of  communities  or  local  industries.  The  group  was  asked  for  two  research  proposals:  one  about  the  use  of  clay  minerals  for  preparing  ceramics  and  refractory  materials,  and  the  second  one  about  the  application  of  clay  minerals  for  water  treatment  at  different  sites.  The  proposals  were  approved  in  July  2013.                   (IPICS  BUF:02)       (Energy  production)  The  research  group  has  interacted  with  the  Sonabel  (Société  Nationale  Burkinabè  d’Electricité),  which  is  in  charge  of  electricity  production  in  the  country,  by  an  oil  fuelled  central  power  plant.  The  group  has  been  asked  to  assess  the  quality  of  the  oil  in  term  of  heavy  metals  contamination.   (IPICS  BUF:02)       (Water  chemistry)  With  regard  to  risks  associated  with  arsenic  toxicity  in  Northern  Burkina  Faso,  the  research  team  comp-­‐osed  of  scientists  from  Belgium  and  Burkina  Faso  had  a  meeting  with  local  authorities  of  the  following  Ministries:  Ministry  of  Health,  Ministry  of  hydraulic,  water  and  sanitation.  They  also  visited  the  President  of  the  University  of  Ouagadougou.  The  results  of  the  discussions  were  documented.   (IPICS  BUF:02)         (National  Center  for  Pysicochemical  Analysis)  Dr.  Bobuié  Guel  was  appointed  to  a  government  committee  in  charge  of  elaborating  the  basis  for  the  building  of  a  national  center  for  physicochemical  analysis.  This  center  includes  the  wide  field  of  Science  and  Technology,  Medicine,  Pharmacy  and  Biology.   (IPICS  BUF:02)       (Nutrition  and  biotechnology)  From  2013,  the  CRSBAN  thanks  to  R.A.BIOTECH  is  reference  for  the  government,  society,  industries  and  NGOs  in  many  areas:    • Food  industries  quality  management  • Constructing  the  nutritional  politics  in  Burkina  Faso  • Consolidation  of  biotechnology  in  many  fields  The  centre  is  invited  to  many  meetings  of  decision  makers  on  various  development  programs,  and  has  organized  short  for  different  groups  acting  in  the  development.       (IPICS  RABiotech)       (Climate  change)  The  network  “PDE,  Modeling  and  Control”  participated  in  outreach  activities  with  policy  makers  on  the  vulnerability  of  African  cities  to  climate  change.  Workshops  were  organized  with  the  pol-­‐itical,  administrative  and  customary  authorities  in  Ouagadougou.  An  indicative  emergency  mas-­‐ter  plan  on  measures  to  be  taken  to  cope  with  natural  disasters,  especially  related  to  flood  risk,  was  developed  with  contribution  from  the  network.  The  network’s  contribution  in  the  national  adaptation  plan  to  climate  

 61  

change  has  been  subject  of  several  reports.  This  contribution  has  a  strong  impact  on  local  and  national  governance  regarding  climate  risks.             (IPMS  BURK:01)    Eritrea   (Seismology)  There  was  a  relatively  large  earthquake  (Richter  magnitude  5.5)  in  the  Massawa  area  on  18  September  2013.  Members  of  ESARSWG  worked  very  closely  with  the  Northern  Red  Sea  Administration  (whose  capital  is  Massawa)  and  gave  a  seminar  to  senior  administrative  authorities  on  how  to  cope  with  earthquake  damages.  The  seminar  was  done  on  the  invitation  of  the  Regional  Administrator.  The  seminar  gave  awareness  and  practical  steps  to  be  taken  in  case  of  emergencies.  Emphasize  was  given  to  the  need  of  an  operational  agency  to  monitor  seismic  and  volcanic  activities.  This  idea  was  well  received  by  government  and  steps  are  being  taken  to  implement  it.         (IPPS  ESARSWG)    The  good  links  the  network  maintains  with  the  Ministry  of  Public  Works  have  resulted  in  that  it  is  now  mandatory  to  get  seismic  assessment  for  large  construction  projects.     (IPPS  ESARSWG)    Ethiopia   (Seismology)  The  Ministry  of  Water  Resources  and  other  stakeholders  received  a  presentation  on  the  seismic  hazard  status  of  the  Tendaho  Dam.                 (IPPS  ETH:02)    A  number  of  presentations  were  made  on  different  occasions  to  the  International  panel  of  experts  and  other  audiences  on  the  seismic  safety  of  the  Great  Ethiopian  Renaissance  Dam  (GERD).  The  site  is  located  in  a  relatively  safe  region  from  a  seismic  point  of  view.  However,  the  possibility  of  Reservoir  Induced  Seismicity  (RIS)  cannot  be  ruled  out  and  will  be  monitored.         (IPPS  ETH:02)    Kenya   (Air  Quality)  National  Environment  Management  Authority  invited  Dr  Gatari  to  advice  on  public  complaints  issues  on  air  quality  in  Kitengela,  Kajiando  County.               (IPPS  KEN:01/2)       (Energy)  In  the  year,  group  members  were  invited  to  various  stakeholder  meetings  to  discuss  policies  for  solar  water  heating  of  new,  large  office  buildings,  to  minimise  the  grid  electricity  load.     (IPPS  KEN:02)         (Energy)  Dr.  David  Maina  delivers  activity  impacts  to  government  and  society  through  his  membership  of  Kenya  Nuclear  Electricity  Board  and  Kenya  Radiation  Protection  Board.       (IPPS  KEN:01/2)     (Engineering)  Registration  of  the  Non-­‐Destructive  Tests  (NDT)  society  was  initiated.  The  purpose  is  to  indep-­‐endently  entrench  NDT  education,  research  and  practice  in  the  private  sector  and  government.  NDT  is  an  important  aspect  of  general  safety  in  economic  development,  and  engineers  and  scientists  needs  to  be  aware  of  its  importance.                 (IPPS  KEN:01/2)       (Environmental  chemistry)  Group  members  have  been  involved  in  updating  the  Kenya  National  Implementation  plan  for  the  Stock-­‐holm  Convention  concerning  the  Global  Monitoring  Plan  on  Persistent  Organic  Pollutants  in  the  Africa  Region,  updating  the  national  inventory  of  Dioxins  emissions  in  the  national  environment  and  also  the  assessment  of  the  National  capacity  for  research,  monitoring  and  public  awareness.   (IPICS  KEN:01)       (Health  care  and  Business)  Published  results  from  research  acticities  of  the  network  have  been  used  in  practice,  influencing  policy,  and  applied  in  teaching  in  the  following  areas:             (IPMS  EAUMP)  • Fighting  spread  of  malaria  in  Kenya  and  the  East  African  region.  • Vaccination  of  livestock  and  small  animals.  • Claims  reserving  in  insurance  business.  • Research  projects  for  PhD  and  MSc  students.       (Nanotechnology)  Prof.  Bernard  O.  Aduda  served  his  last  year  of  a  three-­‐year  term  (from  2010  to  2013)  as  a  Council  member  of  the  National  Council  for  Science  and  Technology.  In  this  capacity  he  has  championed  for  the  

 62  

mainstreaming  of  a  policy  on  Nanoscience  and  Nanotechnology  in  the  country.  This  policy  will  deal  with  education,  training,  research,  governance,  etc.  in  this  field         (IPPS  KEN:02)       (Nuclear  Safety)  Prof.  J.M.  Mwabora  led  a  team  of  researchers  from  various  Government  Agencies  to  conduct  Pre-­‐Feasibility  Studies  for  the  Kenya  Nuclear  Power  Programme.  The  Kenya  Nuclear  Electricity  Board  submitted  the  report  to  the  IAEA.                 (IPPS  KEN:02)       (Scientific  instrumentation)  Currently  the  group  leader  is  in  a  country  study  committee  to  help  establish  a  scientific  equipment  policy  for  the  country  and  the  region.  This  policy  will  be  connected  with  the  developing  research  policy,  which  is  expected  to  state  tha  adequate  equipment  is  fundamental  to  the  quality  and  results  of  research.  This  committee  is  working  under  the  auspices  of  the  Kenya  National  Academy  of  Sciences  and  is  sponsored  by  IFS.                     (IPICS  KEN:02)       (Water  chemistry)  The  group  works  with  Bondo  District  community  in  developing  point  of  use  water  purification  systems.  They  have  held  two  workshops  that  were  attended  by  policy  makers,  government  workers,  academic  staff,  NGO  staff  and  community.               (IPICS  KEN:01)    Southern  Africa  (regional)   (Data  sharing)  Prof.  S.  Mukanganyama  participated  as  a  member  of  the  Southern  Africa  Development  Countries  (SADC)  subcommittee  on  Data  Sharing  in  a  meeting  of  the  5th  African  Digital  Scholarship  and  Curation  Conference,  26-­‐29  June  2013,  Univ.  KwaZulu-­‐Natal,  Durban,  South  Africa.  In  this  activity  it  was  discussed  how  scientific  data  sharing  was  done  in  Zimbabwe  as  compared  to  the  other  Southern  African  countries.  Ideas  were  then  collated  on  the  best  practices  that  can  enable  data  sharing  in  Southern  Africa  including  the  creation  of  specific  databases  for  the  different  scientific  communities.      (IPICS  ZIM:01)    

 

 

   Professor  Lydia  Njenga,  Deputy  group  leader  of  IPICS  KEN:01,  and  some  of  the  members  of  the  group,  giving  a  talk  to  the  Boy  Child  in  the  School  of  Physical  Sciences,  University  of  Nairobi,  Kenya,  as  part  of  the  group’s  outreach  activities.  (Courtesy  of  IPICS  KEN:01)    

 63  

6.3     Examples  on  strengths  and  benefits  to  researchers  and  stakeholders    

6.3.1     Technical  development      The  development  of  technical  resources  is  given.  The  entries  are  given  essentially  as  reported.  

Bangladesh   (Method  development)  A  method  has  been  developed  and  validated  for  the  analysis  of  carbofuran  residues  in  commercial  turmeric  powder  (an  important  spice  used  in  making  curry).             (IPICS  BAN:04)       (Instrumentation)  The  research  facility  has  been  enhanced  by  the  addition  of  a  new  HPLC  equipped  with  a  Photodiode  Array  Detector  (PDA).  The  detector  of  GC-­‐ECD  (Shimadzu  2010)  has  been  saturated  and  was  replaced  by  a  new  EC  detector,  using  local  funds.               (IPICS  BAN:04)    Burkina  Faso   (Method  development)  The  research  group  developed  reliable  voltammetric  methods  for  the  determination  of  various  metals  ions  and  arsenic  in  ground  waters  using  carbon  paste  electrodes.  These  methods  are  cheap  and  environment-­‐friendly  in  comparison  with  conventional  methods  such  as  using  a  mercury  electrode.  The  group  used  AAS  methods  as  well  as  the  developed  electrochemical  methods  for  heavy  metal  ions  determination  applied  to  groundwaters  in  the  village  Yamtenga  located  on  the  outskirts  of  the  capital  Ougadougou.                   (IPICS  BUF:02)    Cambodia   (Instrumentation)  Lars  Lundmark,  Umea  University,  Sweden,  donated  and  installed  an  atomic  absorption  spectrometer  in  the  Dept.  Chemistry,  RUPP.               (IPICS  CAB:01)    Michael  Strandell,  Stockholm  University,  Sweden,  provided  service  and  repair  to  the  GC-­‐MS  instrument  at  the  Dept.  Chemistry,  RUPP.               (IPICS  CAB:01)    Kenya  Michael  Strandell,  Stockholm  University,  Sweden,  provided  service  and  repair  to  the  GC-­‐MS  in  the  Dept.  Chemistry,  UoNBI.                 (IPICS  KEN:01)    6.3.2     Awards,  honors  and  promotions      Several  members  of  ISP-­‐supported  activities  have  been  promoted,  commissioned,  or  received  awards  during  the  year.  The  entries  are  given  essentially  as  reported  to  ISP.    Bangladesh  Prof.  Nilufar  Nahar  was  appointed  as  Provost  of  Kabi  Sufia  Kamal  Hall,  the  largest  residential  hall  of  female  university  students  in  Bangladesh.             (IPICS  BAN:04)    Md.  Iqbal  Rouf  Mamun  and  Mohammad  Shoeb  have  both  been  promoted  to  Associate  Professor.                       (IPICS  BAN:04)    Dr.  Md.  Iqbal  Rouf  Mamun  has  been  nominated  by  the  Department  of  Chemistry,  DU  as  a  member  of  the  “Committee  for  Fine  Chemicals”  of  Bangladesh  Standards  and  Testing  Institute  (BSTI),  Government  of  Bangladesh.                   (IPICS  BAN:04)    Md.  Robiul  Islam  has  joined  the  department  as  a  lecturer  and  became  a  new  member  of  the  group.                       (IPICS  BAN:04)    Burkina  Faso  Prof.  Yvonne  Bonzi  was  honored  with  the  African  Union  Price  of  Science,  Technology  and  Innovation.                       (IPICS  BUF:01)    Prof.  Y.  Bonzi  became  a  Member  of  the  Science  Academy  of  Burkina  Faso.       (IPICS  BUF:01)    

 64  

Prof.  Y.  Bonzi  was  UNESCO’s  Hydro  open-­‐source  software  Platform  of  Experts  (HOPE)  initiative  advocate  in  2013.                     (IPICS  BUF:01)    Iboudo  Ousmane  became  staff  member  at  Ouagadougou  University.       (IPICS  BUF:01)    Prof.  Issa  TAPSOBA  was  nominated  Director  of  Scientific  and  Technical  Cooperation  at  the  General  Direction  of  Scientific  Research  and  Innovation  of  the  Ministry  of  Scientific  Research  and  Innovation  of  Burkina  Faso.                   (IPICS  BUF:01)    Dr.  Samuel  Pare  was  promoted  to  Assoc.  Prof.,  Dept.  Chem.,  Univ.  Ouagadougou.     (IPICS  BUF:02)    At  the  July  sessions  of  the  African  Council  for  Tertiary  Education  (CAMES),  which  evaluate  the  teachers  of  most  African  Francophone  Countries,  the  following  members  of  the  network  “PDE,  Modeling  and  Control  have  been  qualified  and  took  new  positions;  Soma  Safimba  and  Nyanquini  Ismael  as  Assistant  Professors,  and  Zabsonre  Jean  de  Dieu  as  Professor.               (IPMS  BURK:01)    Professor  Hamidou  TOURE  was  elected  as  Perpetuel  Secretary  of  Burkina  National  Academy  of  Science.                     (IPMS  BURK:01)    Issa  Zerbo  and  Sie  Kam  were  promoted  to  Associate  Professors,  Dept.  Physics,  Univ.  Ouagadougou.                       (IPPS  BUF:01)    Cambodia  One  of  the  student’s  theses  was  honored  with  the  HONDA  YES  award.     (IPICS  CAB:01)    Kenya  Prof.  Wandiga  was  appointed  Chairman  of  Moi  University  Council  and  Chancellor  of  Egerton  University.                     (IPICS  KEN:01)    Dr.  Vincent  Madadi  was  appointed  Lecturer  in  the  Det.  Chemistry,  UoNBI.     (IPICS  KEN:01)    Ms.  Ruth  Odhiambo  was  appointed  Tutorial  Fellow  in  the  Det.  Chem.,  UoNBI.   (IPICS  KEN:01)    Prof.  Lydia  Njenga  became  the  substitute  Dean  for  the  School  Phys.  Sci.,  UoNBI.     (IPICS  KEN:01)    Prof.  Lydia  Njenga  was  appointed  a  committee  member  to  review  the  constitution  for  Students  Organization  of  Nairobi  University  (SONU).           (IPICS  KEN:01)    Dr.  Arthur  Wafula  was  promoted  from  Assistant  Lecturer  to  Lecturer,  and  Dr.  Josephine  Wairimu  was  promoted  from  Tutorial  Fellow  to  Lecturer,  both  at  UoNBI.           (IPMS  EAUMP)    Prof.  Julius  M.  Mwabora,  Prof.  Bernard  Aduda  and  Dr.  Kenneth  Kaduki  served  as  Council  members  in  the  Kenya  National  Academy  of  Sciences.             (IPPS  KEN:02)    Dr.  S.  Waita  was  Chief  Jury  member  at  the  International  Science  competition  for  innovative  projects  that  conserve  the  environment,  including  use  of  clean  energy,  at  the  Light  Academy  Schools,  Nairobi,  3  May.  This  was  an  invitation  aimed  at  creating  awareness  of  the  need  to  take  care  of  the  environment  for  a  better  future  using  green  revolution.             (IPPS  KEN:02)    Staff  members  of  the  Condensed  Matter  Physics  group  at  Univ.  Nairobi  served  in  School  Board  of  governors  influencing  governance  and  performance  issues  in  the  secondary  schools:  • Prof.  Julius  M.  Mwabora  at  Voi  Secondary  School  (Member)  and  Mwakichuchu  Secondary  School  

(Member),  Taita  Taveta  County.  • Dr.  Sebastian  Waita  at  Kalumbi  secondary  (Member)  and  at  Gigiri  secondary  School  (Member),  

Makueni  County.  • Dr.  Robinson  Musembi  at  Katwala  Secondary  School  (Chairman)  and  Kanzau  Secondary  School,  

Kitui  County.                   (IPPS  KEN:02)    

 65  

David  Maina  was  promoted  to  Senior  Lecturer  and  confirmed  Director  of  INST.  Before  he  was  acting  Director.  He  was  also  reappointed  as  member  of  Kenya  Nuclear  Electricity  Board  and  Kenya  Radiation  Protection  Board.  He  is  the  chairman  of  Performance  Contracting  Committee  for  the  College  of  Architecture  and  Engineering,  University  of  Nairobi.         (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Three  members  of  the  Condensed  Matter  group  at  the  University  of  Nairobi,  got  promoted  to  the  level  of  Senior  Lecturer  within  the  Dept.  Physics.             (IPPS  KEN:02)    A  number  of  former  Masters  students,  outside  the  University  of  Nairobi,  serve  in  various  sectors  (Aviation  sector  –  Mr.  Wilson  Nyaga;  Education  Quality  Inspectorate  –  Paul  Ajuoga;  Universities  –  Mr.  Samson  Njogu,  Mr.  Henry  Baraza,  Mr.  Alfred  Alex,  Joseph  Olwendo,  Mr.  Raphael  Otakwa;  Police  force  –  Charles  Opiyo).  Thus,  graduates  of  the  Condensed  Matter  group  benefit  several  sectors.     (IPPS  KEN:02)    Prof.  Mghendi  Mwamburi  was  appointed  Director  for  Strategic  planning  and  Performance  Contracting,  University  of  Eldoret.                 (IPPS  KEN:03)    Prof.  Lazare  Etiegni  was  appointed  as  Dean  of  the  School  of  Natural  Resource  Management,  at  Univ.  Nairobi.                     (IPPS  KEN:03)    Senegal  At  the  July  sessions  of  the  African  Council  for  Tertiary  Education  (CAMES),  which  evaluate  the  teachers  of  most  African  Francophone  Countries,  the  following  members  of  the  network  “PDE,  Modeling  and  Control  have  been  qualified  and  took  new  positions;  Mamadou  Abdoul  DIOP,  Ousmane  SALL  and  Mouhamadou  THIAM  as  Assistant  Professors,  and  Mamadou  SY  as  Full  Professor.       (IPMS  BURK:01)    Tanzania  Dr.  Charles  Mahera  was  appointed  coordinator  for  Africa,  and  Dr.  S.  E.  Rugeihyamu  was  ap-­‐pointed  coordinator  of  Univ.  Dar  es  Salaam,  for  the  project  of  the  Higher  Education  Institutions  Institutional  Cooperation  Instrument  (HEI  -­‐ICI)  from  2013  to  2016.         (IPMS  EAUMP)    Zimbabwe  Prof.  Collen  Masimirembwa  became  a  fellow  of  the  African  Academy  of  Sciences.   (IPICS  AiBST)    Ms.  Kudzaishe  Mutsaka  won  the  best  presentation  award  in  the  junior  category  at  the  Annual  Medical  Research  Day.                   (IPICS  AiBST)    Y.S.  Naik  became  member  of  the  Man  and  the  Biosphere,  a  national  committee  of  the  UNESCO  country  office.                     (IPICS  ZIM:02)    N.  Basopo  became  deputy  secretary  of  the  National  University  of  Science  and  Technology  Academic  Women’s  Association  (NUSTAWA).                 (IPICS  ZIM:02)    A.H.  Siwela  became  deputy  editor  of  the  Zimbabwe  Journal  of  Science  and  Technology;  NUST  journal.                       (IPICS  ZIM:02)    6.3.3     Post  doc  and  research  visits    Bangladesh  Four  Cambodian  undergraduate  students,  Chunn  Teak,  Thin  Raksmey,  Neau  Chanmonny  and  You  Alichsantre,  trained  three  weeks  on  heavy  metal  analysis  at  the  Dept.  Chemistry,  Univ.  Dhaka.  Each  was  given  a  low  cost  device  for  arsenic  analysis  to  take  back.             (IPICS  CAB:01)    One  Tanzanian  student,  Ms.  Lutamyo  Nambela,  UDSM,  got  training  and  did  a  part  of  her  MSc  research  work  within  the  Sida  bilateral  program  at  UDSM,  on  residual  DDTs  in  fish  samples.   (IPICS  BAN:04)    Two  Swedish  students  were  received  for  their  Minor  Field  Study.             (IPICS  BAN:04)        

 66  

Burkina  Faso  Prof.  Ingmar  Persson,  SLU,  Sweden,  visited  Dept.  Chemistry,  Univ.  Ouagadougou  to  discuss  scientific  studies  of  arsenic  issues  in  Burkina  Faso             (IPICS  BUF:02)    Finland  Dr.  Betty  Nanyonnga  Kivumbi  (F).  Research  visit  in  May-­‐July  to  Lappeenranta  University  of  Technology,  funded  by  Lappeenranta  University  of  Technology.           (IPMS  EAUMP)    Dr.  Mango  John  (M).  Research  visit  in  June  to  Lappeenranta  University  of  Technology,  funded  by  CIMO.                     (IPMS  EAUMP)    France  Dr.  Cheikh  Talibouya  Diop  (M).  Research  visit  8-­‐30  December  to  l’Antenne  de  Blois  de  L’Université  François  Rabelais  de  Tours,  Blois.               (IPMS  BURK:01)    Prof.  Stanislas  Ouaro  (M).  Research  visit  in  December  to  Département  de  Mathématiques  et  Informatiques  de  l’Université  de  Limoges,  Limoges.             (IPMS  BURK:01)    Dr.  Adama  Ouedraogo,  (M).  Research  visit  in  May  to  Laboratoire  de  Mathématiques  de  Besançon,  Université  de  Franche-­‐Comté,  Franche-­‐Comté             (IPMS  BURK:01)    Dr.  Nana  Bernard  (M),  spent  two  weeks  at  the  Centre  d’Enseignement  et  de  Recherches  en  Environnement  Atmospherique  (CEREA),  Paris.           (IPPS  BUF:01)    Dr.  Yergou  (M)  was  one  month  at  Institut  Curie,  Paris.         (IPPS  ETH:01)    Germany  Prof.  M.  Mwamburi  (M)  attended  a  Technical  Seminar  on  Renewable  Energies  in  Bavaria,  Munich,  Germany,  20-­‐27  October.                 (IPPS  KEN:03)        Italy  Prof.  Mamadou  Sy  (M).  Research  visit  in  May-­‐July  to  ICTP,  Trieste.       (IPMS  BURK:01)    Prof.  Stanislas  Ouaro  (M).  Research  visits  in  May  and  August  to  ICTP,  Trieste.   (IPMS  BURK:01)    Dr.  Blaise  Kone  (M).  Research  visit  in  May-­‐July  to  ICTP,  Trieste.       (IPMS  BURK:01)    Dr.  Safimba  Soma  (M).  Research  visit  in  May-­‐July  to  ICTP,  Trieste.       (IPMS  BURK:01)    Dr.  Aruna  Ouedraogo  (M).  Research  visit  in  May-­‐July  to  ICTP,  Trieste.     (IPMS  BURK:01)    Dr.  Atalay  Ayele  (M),  spent  one  month  at  ITCP,  Trieste.         (IPPS  ETH:02)    Japan  Dr.  Mahbubal  Hoque  (M)  and  Dr.  M.N.I.  Khan  (M)  visited  Tohoku  Univ.     (IPPS  BAN:02)    Kenya  Prof.  T.  Otiti  (Makerere  University,  Uganda),  and  Dr.  S.  Hatwaambo,  Dr.  E.  Lampi  and  Dr.  O.  Munyati  (University  of  Zambia),  spent  one  week  at  the  Condensed  Matter  Group,  Dept.  Physics,  University  of  Nairobi.                     (IPPS  MSSEESA)    Dr.  M.  Mwamburi  spent  five  days  at  the  Condensed  Matter  Group,  Dept.  of  Physics,  University  of  Nairobi.                     (IPPS  MSSEESA)    Dr.  S.  Hatwaambo  (M)  and  Dr.  O.  Munyati  (M)  spent  2  days  at  Univ.  Eldoret.     (IPPS  MSSESA)        

 67  

The  Netherlands  Dr.  Justus  Simiyu  (M),  Dr.  Robinson  Musemb  (M),  Dr.  Alex  Ogacho  (M),  Dr.  Sebastian  Waita  (M),  Boniface  Muthoka  (M),  Charles  Obure  (M),  Evelyn  Akinyi  (F),  Francis  Juma  (M),  Daniel  Karibe  (M),  Zilper  Owuor  (M),  and  Joyce  Moturi  (F)  spent  two  weeks  of  PV  training  at  Delft  University.   (IPPS  KEN:02)    South  Africa  Dr.  Ivivi  Mwanik  (M).  Post  doc  August-­‐October  2013  at  University  of  Cape  Town,  funded  by  University  of  Cape  Town.                   (IPMS  EAUMP)    Dr.  Yergou  Tatek  (M)  and  Prof.  Mulugeta  Bekele  (M)  visited  the  Univ.  Kwazulu  Natal  for  four  days,  17-­‐21  November.                   (IPPS  ETH:01)    Spain  Dr.  Damian  Maingi  (M).  Post  doc  April-­‐May  at  Centre  de  Recerca  Matemàtica  (CRM),  Barcelona,  funded  by  ISP  and  CRM.                   (IPMS  EAUMP)    Sweden  Prof.  Wendimagegn  Mammo  visited  Prof.  Mats  Andersson  at  Chalmers  University  of  Technology,  Gothenburg,  Sweden,  for  reseach,  January  2013  -­‐  August  2013.         (IPICS  ETH:01)    Dr.  Juma  Kasozi  (M).  Ten  days  research  visit  in  May  at  LiU,  funded  by  ISP.     (IPMS  EAUMP)    Dr  Michael  J.  Gatari  (M),  visited  the  group  of  Prof.  Johan  Boman  at  Gothenburg  University  for  scientific  and  project  discussions,  August-­‐October  2013.           (IPPS  KEN:02)    Dr.  J.  Simiyu  (M)  and  Dr.  S.  Waita  (M)  spent  two  months  at  the  Dept.  Physical  Chemistry,  Uppsala  University.                   (IPPS  KEN:02)    Dr.  Lemi  Demeyu  (M)  spent  three  months  at  the  Dept.  Physics,  Chemistry  and  Biology  (IFM),  Linköping  University.                   (IPPS  ETH:01)    Tanzania  Dr.  Mohammad  Shoeb  visited  Dr  Rwaichi  Minja  and  Dr  John  Mahugija,  UDSM,  Tanzania,  for  strengthen  collaboration,  13-­‐17  November.                 (IPICS  BAN:04)    Tunisia  Prof.  Mamadou  Sy  (M).  Research  visit  22-­‐29  November,  at  Laboratoire  de  Mathematiques  et  Dynamique  de  Populations  (LMDP),  Université  de  Cadi  Ayyad  de  Marrakech.       (IPMS  BURK:01)    USA  Prof.  Dr.  F.  A.  Khan  (M)  spent  11  months  at  the  Univ.  Delware,  and  Dr.  S.  Manjura  Hoque  (F)  spent  three  months  at  Yale  Univ.,  USA.               (IPPSBAN:02)    Zambia  Prof.  M.  Mwamburi  (M)  and  Dr.  C.  Maghanga  (M),  Univ.  Eldoret,  Kenya,  spent  two  days  at  the  Dept.  of  Physics,  Univ.  Zambia.                 (IPPS  MSSEESA)    Zimbabwe  Takudzwa  Mutisi  (F),  Zimbabwe  Ministry  of  Health  &  Child  Care,  the  National  Microbiology  Reference  Laboratory,  spent  12  months  of  at  AiBST  as  a  WHO-­‐TDR  Clinical  Trial  Science  Research  fellow.                       (IPICS  AiBST)                

 68  

 Professor  Mohammed  Mosihuzzaman,  Chairman  of  ANRAP  Board,  addressing  the  audience  at  a  National  Seminar  in  Dhala,  Bangladesh.  (Courtesy  of  IPICS  ANRAP)    

 Undergraduate  students  from  Department  of  Chemistry,  Royal  University  of  Phnom  Penh,  Cambodia,  visiting  Bangladesh  for  thesis  work,  under  the  supervision  of  Dr.  Arifur  Rahman,  Department  of  Chemistry,  University  of  Dhaka  (far  left).  (Courtesy  of  Chanmonny  Neau,  IPICS  CAB:01).    

 69  

6.4     Communication  and  use  of  research  results  

The  entries  are  given  essentially  as  reported  to  ISP.  Meetings  are  listed  chronologically  for  each  country.  Summaries  are  given  in  Tables  18  and  19.  

6.4.1     Communication  of  research  results  at  scientific  conferences  and  meetings      Table  18.  Summary;  number  of  oral  (O)  and  poster  (P)  contributions  to  scientific  meetings  Region   Country   IPICS   IPMS   IPPS   Total       P   O   P   O   P   O   P   O  Africa   Algeria     1             1  Africa   Benin   1   3           1   3  Africa   Burkina  Faso   2   14       8     10   14  Africa   Cameroon           2     2    Africa   Ethiopia   1   9         5   1   14  Africa   Ghana     1             1  Africa   Ivory  Coast           2   2   2   2  Africa   Kenya     4     3   4   39   4   46  Africa   Morocco   3   4           3   4  Africa   Rwanda             1     1  Africa   South  Africa     11     6     4     21  Afriuca   Sudan     5             5  Africa   Tanzania     6             6  Africa   Uganda     1             1  Africa   Zambia   5   18           5   18  Africa   Zimbabwe     3             3  Asia   Bangladesh   2   12       7   11   9   24  Asia   Cambodia     5         3     8  Asia   China     1       1   2   1   3  Asia   India     1         2     3  Asia   Japan           3   2   3   2  Asia   Mongolia         1         1  Asia   Myanmar         1         1  Asia   Pakistan     3             3  Asia   Thailand   3   4           3   4  Asia   Vietnam           1     1    Europe   Austria           2   2   2   2  Europe   Czech  Republ.           3   2   3   2  Europe   France     2             2  Europe   Germany         1     4     5  Europe   Ireland     1             1  Europe   Italy       1       1   1   1  Europe   Netherlands   1             1    Europe   Norway             1     1  Europer   Poland     1             1  Europe   Portugal     1     1     2     4  Europe   Spain     1   1         1   1  Europe   Sweden     1       2   1   2   2  Europe   Switzerland           4   2   4   2  Europe   Turkey           2     2    Europe   UK   1         1     2   0  N.Am   Honduras             1     1  N.Am.   Mexico             3     3  N.Am.   USA   2     1   1   4   3   7   4  S.Am   Argentina     2             2  S.Am.   Bolivia     5             5  S.Am   Brazil     1             1  S.Am.   Chile     3             3  All  countries   21   124   3   14   44   96   68   234  

 70  

Algeria  Colloque  Internat.  sur  les  Matériaux  et  le  Développement  Durable  (CIMDD),  6-­‐9  May,  Boumerdès    B.  Sorgho,  L.  Zerbo,  B.  Guel,  I.  Keita,  C.  Dembele,  M.  Plea,  V.  Sol,  M.  Gomina,  P.Blanchart,  Durabil-­‐ité  des  propriétés  mécaniques  des  géomatériaux  pour  la  construction.  (O)       (IPICS  BUF  :02)                       (IPICS  MAL:01)  Argentina  First  Argentinian  Congress  of  Behavioral  Biology,  COMPORTA  2013,  15-­‐17  April,  Mar  del  Plata    Pinto,  C.F.,  Torrico,  D.,  Cáceres,  L.,  Flores-­‐Prado,  L.  &  Niemeyer,  H.M.,  Behavioral  patterns  of  a  membracid  in  the  context  of  alternative  hosts.  (O)             (IPICS  LANBIO)    Flores-­‐Prado,  L.,  Pinto,  C.F.,  Host  location  behaviour  exhibited  by  parasitoids  of  bees.  (O)                         (IPICS  LANBIO)    Austria  European  Geosciences  Union  General  Assembly,  7–12  April,  Vienna    Ayele  A.,  Midzi,  V.,  Ateba  B.,  Mulabisana  T.,  Marimira  K.,  Hlatywayo  D.J.,  Akpan  O.,  Amponsah  P.,  Georges  T.M.,  Durrheim  R.,  Earthquake  Hazard  and  Risk  in  Sub-­‐Saharan  Africa:  current  status  of  the  Global  Earthquake  model  (GEM)  initiative  in  the  region.  (O)           (IPPS  ETH:02)    Fuentes,  D.,  Halldin  S.,  Beven  K.J.,  and  Xu  C.Y.,  Width  Function  for  Flood  Hydrograph  Estimation  at  Ungauged  Basin.  (P)                 (IPPS  NADMICA)    Guinea  Barrientos,  H.  E.,  &  Swain,  A.,  Rainfall  Induced  Natural  Disaster  in  Central  America,  Challenge  for  Regional  Risk  Management.  (P)               (IPPS  NADMICA)    International  Conference  on  Nuclear  Security:  Enhancing  Global  Efforts,  1-­‐5  July,  Vienna      Angeyo  H.K.,  A  conceptual  framework  towards  developing  chemometrics  and  machine  learning  assisted  spectrometries  for  rapid  nuclear  forensics  analysis.  (O)         (IPPS  KEN:04)    Bangladesh  International  Conference  on  Advances  in  Physics,  3-­‐5  January,  Shahjalal  Univ.  Sci.  Technol.    S.S.  Sikder,  Z.H.  Khan,  M.A.  Hakim,  S.Akhter,  H.N.  Das,  Thermal  hysteresis  of  permeability  and  transport  properties  of  Cu  substituted  Ni0.28Cu0.10+xZn0.62-­‐xFe1.98O4  ferrites.  (O)       (IPPS  BAN:02)    S.  Karimunnesa,  D.P.  Paul,  S.  Akhter,  D.K.  Saha,  H.N.  Das,  Md.  Al  Mamun,  Structural  and  Magnetic  Properties  of  Li0.5-­‐x/2CdxBi0.02Fe2.48-­‐x/2O4  Ferrites  (O).           (IPPS  BAN:02  )    International  Bose  Conference,  4  February,  University  of  Dhaka    M.F.  Huq,  D.K.  Saha  and  Z.H.  Mahmood,  Study  of  the  Effect  of  Bi2O3  Additive  on  Microstructure  and  Magnetic  Properties  of  Ni0.35Cu0.15Zn0.50  Ferrite.  (O)         (IPPS  BAN:02)    A.  Khan,  G.D.  Al-­‐Quaderi,  S.  Choudhury,  M.A.  Bhuiyan,  K.M.A.  Hussain,  A.A.  Begum,  S.  Akhter,  Ef-­‐fect  of  Zn  substitution  on  the  magnetic  properties  of  cobalt  ferrites.  (P)       (IPPS  BAN:02)    M.H.M.  Ahmed,  S.  Choudhury,  A.K.M.  Akhter  Hossain,  H.N.  Das,  A.A.  Begum,  S.  Akhter,  Magnetic,  dielectric  and  high  frequency  complex  permeability  studies  of  Zn-­‐Li  ferrites.  (P)     (IPPS  BAN:02)    G.D.  Al-­‐Quaderi,  R.C.  Ghosh,  K.H.  Maria,  M.A.  Bhuiyan,  S.  Choudhury,  A.  Khan,  K.M.A.  Hussain,  H.N.  Das,  S.  Akhter,  Synthesis  and  characterization  of  barium-­‐hexaferrites.  (P)       (IPPS  BAN:02)    

 71  

Z.H.  Khan,  S.S.  Sikder,  M.A.  Hakim,  S.M.  Hoque,  S.  Akhter,  Effect  of  V2O5  and  Li2O  on  the  Magnetic  Properties  of  Ni-­‐Cu-­‐Zn  Ferrites.  (P)             (IPPS  BAN:02)    National  Conference  on  Progress  in  Physics,  30  March,  Chittagong  University    S.  Akhter,  D.P.  Paul,  S.  Akhter,  D.K.  Saha,  A.  Parveen,  B.  Anjuman,  M.A.  Hakim  and  F.  Islam,  En-­‐hancement  in  magnetic  properties  of  Mg  substituted  Cu-­‐Mg  ferrites.  (O)       (IPPS  BAN:02)    S.  Karimunnesa,  D.P.  Paul,  S.  Ahkter,  D.K.  Saha,  H.N.  Das  and  M.A.  Mamun,  Investigations  of  the  structural  magnetic  and  electrical  properties  of  LiCdBiFe2O4  ferrites.  (P)       (IPPS  BAN:02)    19th  Conference  of  the  Islamic  World  Academy  of  Sciences,  5-­‐9  May,  Dhaka    A.  Al-­‐Amin,  S.  Parvin,  M.A.  Kadir,  T.  Tahmid,  S.K.  Alam,  K.S.  Rabbani,  Breast  Tumour  Classification  Using  Electrical  Impedance.  (P)                 (IPPS  BAN:04)    F.A.  Kahn,  M.  Bah,  I.  Shah,  P.  Nordblad,  Exchange  bias  magnetic  properties  of  manganese-­‐oxide  core-­‐shell  nanoparticles  fabricated  by  inert  gas  condensation  (IGC)  technique.  (O)     (IPPS  BAN:02)    Md.  Iqbal  Rouf  Mamun,  Pesticide  residues  and  their  dissipation  pattern  in  vegetable  and  tea  samples  grown  in  Bangladesh.  (P)                 (IPICS  BAN:04)    M.  Shoeb,  Endophytic  funguses  are  sources  of  novel  pharmaceuticals.  (P)     (IPICS  BAN:04)    Md  A.  Yusuf,  E.  Lundgren,  S.  Zaman  and  K.S.  Rabbani.  Improvement  of  a  very  low  cost  solar  pasteurisation  device.  (P)                   (IPPS  BAN:04)    Int.  Conf.  on  Updates  on  National  products  in  Medicine  and  Healthcare  Systems,  6  July,  Khulna    B.Rokeya,  Medicinal  plants  in  combating  the  emerging  threats  of  type  2  diabetes.  (O)  (IPICS  ANRAP)    49th  NITUB  Training  Program  on  HPLC,  BCSIR,  Dhaka,  24-­‐29  August  2013    Nilufar  Nahar,  Principles  of  Chromatography.  (O)           (IPICS  BAN:04)    Md.  Iqbal  Rouf  Mamun,  Method  development  and  Validation.  (O)       (IPICS  BAN:04)    Mohammad  Shoeb,  Basic  instrumentation  of  HPLC  and  its  application.  (O)       (IPICS  BAN:04)    Workshop  on  Research  and  Service  Facilities  of  Atomic  Energy  Centre  29  August,  Dhaka    Manjura  Hoque,  An  Overview  of  Research  and  Service  Facilities  of  Materials  Science  Division,  AECD.  (O)                     (IPPS  BAN:02)    Bangladesh  Sciences,  Challenges  of  21  Centuries,  2  November,  Asiatic  Society,  Dhaka    Mohammad  Shoeb,  Natural  Products  from  Endophytic  Fungi.  (O)       (IPICS  BAN:04)    First  National  Conference  of  Bangladesh  Crystallographic  Association,  5  December,  Dhaka    N.C.  Ghosh,  H.N.  Das,  M.A.  Gafur  and  A.K.M.  Akter  Hossain,  Structural  and  Magnetic  Properties  on  Nanocrystalline  NiFeMo  Alloy.  (O)             (IPPS  BAN:02)    E.  Hossain.  S.  Choudhury,  M.A.  Bhuian,  K.H.  Maria,  D.K.  Saha,  M.A.  Hakim,  Structural  properties  and  crystallization  behavior  of  FINEMET  Fe74Cu1.5Nb2.5Si12B10  alloy  under  different  annealing  condition.  (O)                     (IPPS  BAN:02)    

 72  

M.  Jobair,  T.K.  Datta,  M.H.  Ahsan,  H.  Shahzad,  S.M.  Yunus,  I.  Kamal,  A.K.  M.  Zakarria,  A.  K.  Das,  M.S.  Akter,  Samia  I,  Liba  and  D.K.  Saha,  Synthesis  and  Determination  of  Structural  Parameters  of  La  Doped  Dielectric  Materials  (Ba1-­‐xLax).  (O)                 (IPPS  BAN:02)    A.K.M.  Atique  Ullah,  D.K.  Saha  and  S.H.  Firoz,  Synthesis  of  Mn3O4  Nanoparticles  via  a  Gel  Formation  Route  and  its  Structural  Characterization.  (O)             (IPPS  BAN:02)    S.K.  Saha,  S.  Choudhury,  M.A.  Hossain,  Structural  properties  of  nanocrystalline  Fe75.5Si13.5Cu1  Nb1B9  FINEMET  alloy  with  variation  of  annealing  condition.  (O)         (IPPS  BAN:02)    M.M.H.  Shuvo,  M.  Asaduzzaman,  D.K.  Saha,  P.Bala,  X-­‐Ray  Diffraction  studies  on  thermal  trans-­‐formation  of  di-­‐ethylammomium  and  tri-­‐ethylammonium  intercalated  Na-­‐montmorillonite.  (O)   (IPPS  BAN:02)    9th  ANRAP  National  Seminar,  16  November,  BUHS,  Dhaka    Masfida  Akhter,  Animal  models  of  diabetes  mellitus.  (O)         (IPICS  ANRAP)    N.  Nahar,  Drug  from  plant  sources  for  diabetes  is  a  challenge  of  21st  century.  (O)   (IPICS  ANRAP)    Ismet  Ara  Jahan,  Antioxidant  activity  and  marker  compound  analysis  of  some  of  the  medicinal  plants  grown  in  Bangladesh.  (O)               (IPICS  ANRAP)    Omar  Faruque,  Chronic  subclinical  inflammation  and  type  2  diabetes  mellitus.  (O)   (IPICS  ANRAP)    B.  Rokeya,  Role  of  medicinal  plants  in  combating  the  emerging  threats  of  type  2  diabetes.  (O)                         (IPICS  ANRAP)    S.H.  Khan,  Chemical  fingerprinting  studies  of  some  antidiabetic  plants.  (O)       (IPICS  ANRAP)    F.  Saleh,  Phytoestrogens  in  the  management  of  metabolic  disorders.  (O)       (IPICS  ANRAP)    Zahid  Hassan,  The  pathophysiology  of  diabetes  in  mellitus.  (O)       (IPICS  ANRAP)    Benin  ReSBOA  meeting  20-­‐22,  May,  Cotonou    E.  Palé,  Teneurs  en  antioxidants  naturels  des  aliments  du  Burkina  Faso.  (O)     (IPICS  BUF:01)    E.  Palé,  Colorants  alimentaires  naturels  études  et  propriétés  biologiques.  (O)  (   IPICS  BUF:01)    A.  Hema,  M.  Koala,  A.  Mbaiogaou,  E.  Palé,  A.  Sérémé,  M.  Nacro,  Teneurs  en  antioxydants  totaux  d’aliments  locaux  du  Burkina  Faso.  (O)     (IPICS  BUF:01)    Samuel  Paré  &  L.  Yvonne  Bonzi-­‐Coulibaly.  ETAT  DE  LA  QUALITÉ  DE  L'EAU  EN  AFRIQUE  DE  L’OUEST  ET  DU  CENTRE.  (P)     (IPICS  BUF  :01)    Bolivia  4th  National  Congress  of  Entomology,  November  13-­‐15,  Cochabamba,  Bolivia    Torrico-­‐Bazoberry,  D.,  Cáceres-­‐Sánchez,  L.,  Saavedra-­‐Ulloa,  D.,  Flores-­‐Prado,  L.,  Niemeyer,  H.M.  &  Pinto,  C.F.,  Biology  and  ecology  of  Alchisme  grossa  in  cloud  forest  of  Bolivian  Yungas.  (O)     (IPICS  LANBIO)    Torrico-­‐Bazoberry,  D.,  Cossio,  R.,  Reque,  K.  &  Pinto,  C.F.,  Fitness  of  Alchisme  grossa  in  the  context  of  use  of  two  alternative  hosts  in  Bolivian  Yungas.  (O)             (IPICS  LANBIO)    Coca,  A.,  Cáceres-­‐Sánchez,  L.,  Torrico-­‐Bazoberry,  D.  &  Pinto,  C.F.,  Host  alternation  and  disperssion  patterns  in  Alchisme  grossa.  (O)                 (IPICS  LANBIO)  

 73  

Cáceres-­‐Sánchez,  L.,  Aguilar,  S.  &  Pinto,  C.F.,  Kin  recognition  in  Alchisme  grossa,  a  sub  social  membracid  of  ther  Bolivian  Yungas.  (O)                 (IPICS  LANBIO)    Cáceres-­‐Sánchez,  L.,  Pozo,  P.,  Torrico-­‐Bazoberry,  D.,  Palottini,  F.,  Méndez,  P.,  Pinto,  C.F.,  Effect  of  floral  morphology  on  floral  visitors  to  Teucrium  bicolor  SM.  (Lamiaceae),  Río  Clarillo  (Chile).  (O)                         (IPICS  LANBIO)    Brazil  International  Clay  Conference,  8-­‐11  July,  Rio    B.  Sorgho,  L.  Zerbo,  B.  Guel,  I.  Keita,  C.  Dembele,  M.  Plea,  V.  Sol,  M.  Gomina,  P.  Blanchart,  Mechanical  properties  and  Ageing  of  Clay  Geomaterials  for  Building.  (O)       (IPICS  BUF:02)                       (IPICS  MAL:01)    Burkina  Faso  Conférence  International  sur  les  Eco-­‐matériaux  de  construction  de  l’Institut  International  d’Ingénierie  de  l’Eau  et  de  l’Environnement  (2ie),  10-­‐12  June,  Ouagadougou    B.  Sorgho,  L.Zerbo,  B.  Guel,  I.  Keita,  C.  Dembele,  M.  Plea,  V.  Sol,  M.  Gomina,  P.  Blanchart,  Durabil-­‐ité  des  propriétés  mécaniques  des  géomatériaux  pour  la  construction.  (O)       (IPICS  BUF  :02)                       (IPICS  MAL  :01)    15èmes  Journées  Scientifiques  Annuelles  de  la  SOACHIM,  12-­‐16  August,  Univ.  Ouagadougou    A.A.  Mahamane,  B.  Guel,  P.-­‐L.  Fabre,  T.  Ramdé,  L.  Bonou,  J.B.  Legma,  Etude  et  caractérisations  de  films  métalliques  électrodéposés  sur  carbone  vitreux  pour  la  détection  du  thallium  dans  les  eaux.  (P)                       (IPICS  BUF  :02)    A.A  Mahamane,  B.  Guel,  T.  Ramdé,  L.  Bonou,  J.B.  Legma,  Etude  électrochimique  du  Manganèse  (II)  en  présence  de  2-­‐(5’-­‐Bromo-­‐2’-­‐pyridylazo)-­‐5-­‐diethylaminophénol  (5-­‐Br-­‐PADAP)  comme  agent  complexant  sur  une  électrode  à  pâte  de  carbone.  (O)             (IPICS  BUF  :02)    S.  Ouédraogo,  M.  Bayo-­‐Bangoura,  B.  Ouemega,  K.  Bayo,  B.Guel,  Etude  d’une  série  de  phtalocyanines  de  cobalt  et  de  zinc  par  la  chronoampérométrie.  (O)           (IPICS  BUF  :02)    Mohamed  Seynou,  Raguilnaba  Ouédraogo,  Jean  Ambroise,  Pozzolanic  activity  of  raw  clay  materials  from  Burkina  Faso.  (P)                 (IPICS  BUF:02)    Bonzi  Coulibaly  Yvonne,  Contribution  des  biopesticides  d’origine  végétale  dans  la  productivité  agricole.  (O)                     (IPICS  BUF:01)    Ousmane  ILBOUDO,  Spectrométrie  de  masse  en  tandem  des  flavonoïdes  7-­‐O-­‐diglycosides  isomère:  différenciation  par  complexation  avec  le  cuivre.  (O)           (IPICS  BUF:01)    Ousmane  ILBOUDO,  Evaluation  de  la  phytotoxicité  des  flavonoïdes  contre  les  graines  de  maïs.  (O)                       (IPICS  BUF:01)    Boubacar  TRAORE,  Interaction  clay  and  pesticide  in  the  Malian  soils.  (O)     (IPICS  MAL:01)  Drissa  SAMAKE,  La  nanokaolinite  naturelle  de  Niono  (Mali):  adsorption  du  chrome  dans  les  eaux  usées  de  tannerie  en  présence  des  composés  organiques.  (O)         (IPICS  MAL:01)    Sanata  TRAORE,  Teneur  en  zinc  des  sols  de  culture  maraîchère  et  de  leurs  produits  dans  la  ville  de  Bamako  et  environs.  (O)                 (IPICS  MAL:01)        

 74  

4th  International  Conference  on  Biofuel,  21  -­‐23  November,  Ouagadougou      Alfred.  S.  Traore,  RENFORCEMENT  DE  LA  PRODUCTION  DES  BIOENERGIES  AU  BURKINA  FASO  A  TRAVERS  LA  BIOFERMENTATION  DES  RESIDUS  DE  MANGUES  ISSUS  DE  L’AGRO-­‐INDUSTRIE.  (O)                       (IPICS  RABiotech)    Journées  scientifiques,  University  of  Ouagadougou,  25-­‐30  November    Ousmane  ILBOUDO,  Evaluation  de  la  phytotoxicité  des  flavonoïdes  contre  les  graines  de  maïs.  (O)                       (IPICS  BUF  :01)    Bonzi  Coulibaly  Libona  Yvonne,  Contribution  des  biopesticides  d’origine  végétale  dans  la  productivité  agricole.  (O)                   (IPICS  BUF:01)    ISP  BUF  Physics  project  presentation  and  scientific  exchanges,  12-­‐14  December,  Ouagadougou    B.  Korgo,  Desert  dust  in  West  Africa:  source,  mobilization  and  transport.  (O)     (IPPS  BUF:01)    G.  Boubié,  An  experience  of  ISP  collaboration  in  the  Dept.  Chemistry.  (O)     (IPPS  BUF:01)    D.J.  Bathiebo,  Dying  in  granular  porous  medium  in  natural  convection-­‐  climate  change  and  energy,  vulnerability  and  adaptability.  (O)             (IPPS  BUF:01)    M.  Sougoti,  Multispectral  spectroscopy  and  applications.  (O)       (IPPS  BUF:01)    N.  Bernard,  Air  pollution  in  Ouagadougou.  (O)           (IPPS  BUF:01)    I.  Zerbo,  Influence  of  electromagnetic  waves  on  silicon  solar  cells  under  monochromatic  light  in  steady  state.  (O)                   (IPPS  BUF:01)      M.  Zoungrana,  Effect  of  external  electric  field  on  silicon  solar  cells.  (O)     (IPPS  BUF:01)      N.  Kouassi,  Electromagnetic  compatibility  -­‐  adaptation  measures.  (O)     (IPPS  BUF:01)    Journées  de  partage  d’expériences  sur  les  Bio-­‐pesticides,  17-­‐18  December,  Univ.  Ouagadougou      O.  ILBOUDO,  Activité  antifongique  de  l’extrait  flavonoïque  de  Mentha  piperita.  (O)     (IPICS  BUF  :01)    Bonzi  Coulibaly  Libona  Yvonne,  Contribution  des  biopesticides  d’origine  végétale  dans  la  productivité  agricole.  (O)                     (IPICS  BUF:01)    Cambodia  Cambodian  Chemical  Society,  CCS's  conference,  29-­‐30  August,  Phnom  Penh    Neau,  C.,  Determination  of  mercury  in  13  species  of  fish  from  Tonle  Sap  River  (Kampong  Chhnang  province)  and  7  species  of  farmfish.  (O)             (IPICS  CAB:01)    Tith,  S.,  Qualitative  and  Quantitative  study  of  Cyanide  in  Bamboo  Shoot  (Bambusa  multiplex)  in  Kandal  and  Kampong  Cham  province.  (O)               (IPICS  CAB:01)  Thin,  R.,  Determination  of  mercury  in  marine  fishes  in  Sihanouk  province.  (O)   (IPICS  CAB:01)    You,  A.,  Determination  of  iron  in  fish  from  four  villages  at  Kampong  Chhnang  province,  Kandal  market  and  farm  fish  in  Phnom  Penh.  (O)                 (IPICS  CAB:01)    Chunn,  T.,  Identification  and  quantification  of  the  main  volatile  compound  in  rice  spirit  from  Svay  Rieng  province  and  some  markets  in  Phnom  Penh.  (O)           (IPICS  CAB:01)  

 75  

The  2nd  Workshop  on  Natural  Science,  21  October,  RUPP,  Phnom  Penh    C.O. Chey.  ZnO  nanomaterials  based  biosensors  and  current  status:  A  short  review.  (O)                       (IPPS  CAM:01)    T.  Sriv,  MATLAB-­‐Based  Numerical  Analysis  of  the  Performance  of  Mobile  Cellular  Radio  Systems  Using  MRC  in  K-­‐distribution  Multipath  Fading  Environment.  (O)         (IPPS  CAM:01)    The  3rd  academic  conference  on  natural  science  for  master  and  PhD  students  from  ASEAN  countries,  11-­‐15  November,  Phnom  Penh    K.  Khun,  Z.  H.  Ibupoto,  S.  Chen,  W.M.  Chen,  I.A.  Buyanova,  M.  Willander,  Synthesis  of  ZnO  nano-­‐rods  in  PbS  solution,  their  morphological  and  optical  characterization.  (O)         (IPPS  CAM:01)    Cameroon  High  level  physics  and  appropriate  solutions  to  real  life  problems  in  developing  countries,  25-­‐29  November,  Yaounde    Kaduki  K.A.,  Physics  at  the  University  of  Nairobi.  (O)         (IPPS  KEN:04)    Dehayem-­‐Massop,  A.,  Research  activities  in  Physics  in  East  Africa.  (O)     (IPPS  KEN:04)    Chile  V  Binational  meeting  of  Ecology  Argentina  –  Chile,  November  3-­‐  6,  Puerto  Varas    Lemaitre,  A.B.,  Pinto,  C.F.,  Niemeyer,  H.M.,  Differential  selection  pressures  exerted  by  nocturnal  and  diurnal  pollinators  in  a  cactus  with  mixed  pollination  syndrome.  (O)       (IPICS  LANBIO)    Pinto,  C.F.,  Coca,  A.,  Cáceres,  L.,  Flores-­‐Prado,  L.,  Niemeyer,  H.M.,  Host  use  patterns  and  feeding  fidelity  in  the  membracid  Alchisme  grossa  in  the  Bolivian  Yungas.  (O)           (IPICS  LANBIO)    XXXV  National  Congress  of  Entomology,  November  27–29,  Concepción,  Chile    Flores-­‐Prado,  L.,  Manríquez,  G.,  Pinto,  C.F.,  Fonturbel,  F.E.,  Phenotypic  variation  and  natural  selection  in  females  of  Manuelia  postica  (Hymenoptera,  Apidae),  related  with  the  alternative  use  of  nesting  hosts.  (O)                     (IPICS  LANBIO)  China    Conference  on  Nanomaterials,  16-­‐18  August,  Beijing    S.M.  Hoque,  H.N.  Das,  S.  Akhter,  D.K.  Saha,  M.A.  Mamun,  Superparamagnetic  transition  of  NiFe2O4  nanoparticles  studied  by  Mossbauer  and  magnetization  studies  and  their  application  as  MRI  contrast  agent.  (P)                   (IPPS  BAN:02  )    S.M.  Hoque,  Md.  Al  Mamun,  S.  Akhter,  U.  Sridhar,  S.  Islam,  D.K.  Saha,  H.N.  Das,  Dependence  of  coercivity  and  magnetic  loss  with  frequency  and  heat  treatment  of  Si-­‐rich  FINEMET  type  alloy.  (P)                         (IPPS  BAN:02)  64th  International  Astronautical  Congress,  23-­‐27  September,  Beijing    C.  Chuma  and  D.J.  Hlatywayo.  Geospatial  analysis  of  the  aquiferous  potential  zones  in  the  crystalline  basement  of  Bulawayo  metropolitan  area,  Zimbabwe.  (O)         (IPPS  ZIM:01)    Nano  Science  and  Technology  conference,  26-­‐28  September,  Xian    Boitumelo  Mudabuka,  Nanofibre  as  host  for  calorimetric  probes  for  ascorbic  acid  and  dopamine  in  biological  and  pharmaceutical  samples.  (O)           (IPICS  SEANAC)        

 76  

Czech  Republic  Aerosol  Emissions  from  Fossil  Fuel  and  Biomass  Combustion  Workshop,  31  Aug.–1  Sept.,  Prague    Gatari  M.J.,  Kinney  P.L.,  Volavka-­‐Close  N.,  Ngo  N.,  Gaita  S.M.,  Chillrud  S.N.,  Gachanja  A.,  Graeff  J.,  Sclar  E.,  Black  carbon  in  archived  samples  of  2009  air  quality  study  in  Nairobi,  Kenya.  (O&P)   (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    European  Aerosol  Conference,  1–6  September,  Prague    Gatari  M.J.,  Kinney  P.L.,  Volavka-­‐Close  N.,  Ngo  N.,  Gaita  S.M.,  Chillrud  S.N.,  Gachanja  A.,  Graeff  J.,  Sclar  E.  Black  carbon  in  archived  samples  of  2009  air  quality  study  in  Nairobi,  Kenya.  (O)   (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Gatari  M.  J.,  Mwaniki  G.  R.  and  Maina  D.  M.,  Trends  of  air  quality  in  a  fast  growing  Sub-­‐Saharan  African  city:  Nairobi.  (P)                   (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Gaita  S.  M.,  Boman  J.,  Pettersson  J.  B.  C.,  Gatari  M.  J.  and  Janhäll  S.,  Seasonal  variation  of  urban  aerosols  in  a  sub-­‐Saharan  city:  case  study  of  Nairobi.  (P)           (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Ethiopia  Ethiopian  Physical  Society  Annual  Meeting,  2-­‐3  February,  Mekelle  University    A.  Gesese,  Y.  Tatek,  A  Monte  Carlo  model  of  tumor  growth.  (O)       (IPPS  ETH:01)    S.  Negash,  Y.  Tatek,  Measuring  the  speed  of  sound  in  a  Lennards-­‐Jones  Fluid.  (O)   (IPPS  ETH:01)    PACN  congress  on  sustainability  in  Africa:  Energy,  water  and  waste,  3-­‐5  December,  Addis  Ababa    Olle  Inganäs  and  Shimelis  Admassie,  Conducting  polymer  and  biopolymer-­‐based  energy  conversion  and  storage  for  sustainable  electricity.  (O)             (IPICS  ETH:01)    Vincent  Madadi  and  Shem  Wandiga,  The  Role  of  Chemical  Sciences  in  Addressing  Water  Quality  Challenges  in  Developing  Countries.  (O)             (IPICS  KEN:01)    7th  Int.  Conference  of  the  Africa  Materials  Research  Society,  8-­‐13  December,  Addis  Ababa    M.  Bekele,  Optimal  efficiency  and  figure  of  merit  of  a  tighly  coupled  molecular  motor.  (O)                       (IPPS  ETH:01)    Cheick  DEMBELE,  Mechanism  of  traditional  Bogolan  dyeing  technique  with  clay  on  cotton  fabric.  (O)                       (IPICS  MAL:01)    F.  W.  Nyongesa,  B.  O.  Aduda  and  A.  A.  Ogacho,  Organic  binders  to  enhance  fuel  efficiency  of  charcoal  stoves  (jikos)  and  in  water  filters.  (O)             (IPPS  KEN:02)    T.  Otiti.  The  Joint  US  Africa  Materials  Institute  Cooperation  with  the  East  Africa  region  and  the  Africa  Materials  Reserach  Society.  (O)               (IPPS  UGA:01/1)    Wendimagegn  Mammo,  Synthesis  and  characterization  of  conjugated  polymers:  The  Ethiopian  experience.  (O)                   (IPICS  ETH:01)    O.  Inganäs  &  S.  Admassie,  Organic  photovoltaic  modules  and  biopolymer  supercapacitors  for  supply  of  renewable  electricity:  A  perspective  from  Africa.  (O)         (IPICS  ETH:01)    A.  Geto,  M.  Tessema  &  S.  Admassie,  Conducting  polymer  and  carbon  nanotube  composites  for  electrochemical  determination  of  biologically  active  compounds.  (O)     (IPICS  ETH:01)    Maereg  Amare  and  Shimelis  Admassie,  Conducting  polymer  modified  electrodes  for  the  electrochemical  determination  of  alkalods  and  pesticides.  (O)           (IPICS  ETH:01)    

 77  

S.  Mehretie,  M.  Tessema,  T.  Solomon  &  S.  Admassie,  Poly(3,4-­‐ethylenedioxythiophen)-­‐based  electrochemical  sensors  for  analysis  of  pharmaceutical  substances.  (O)     (IPICS  ETH:01)    A.Workie,  A.  Tadesse  &  S.  Admassie,  Synthesis  and  characterization  of  MWCNTs/Ag-­‐ZnO  nanocomposite  for  photocatalytic  and  sensor  applications.  (O)             (IPICS  ETH:01)    Z.A.  Gerba,  W.  Mammo  &  M.R.  Andersson,  Synthesis  of  conjugated  polymers  for  organic  solar  cells  using  direct  arylation  polycondensation.  (P)             (IPICS  ETH:01)    France  Cycle  de  Formation,  Coopération  et  Développement  2012-­‐2013,  25  January,  Marseille    Y.  L.  Bonzi-­‐Coulibaly.  Regard  d’un  acteur  du  Sud  sur  l’action  des  partenaires  internationaux  dans  le  secteur  agricole.  (O)                 (IPICS  BUF:01)    Groupe  Français  des  Argiles,  Colloque  Annuel,  11-­‐13  April    B.  Sorgho,  L.  Zerbo,  B.  Guel,  I.  Keita,  C.  Dembele,  M.  Plea,  V.  Sol,  M.  Gomina,  P.  Blanchart,  Durabil-­‐ité  des  propriétés  mécaniques  des  géomatériaux  pour  la  construction.  (O)   (IPICS  BUF  :02)   (IPICS  MAL:01)    Germany  XVth  International  Conference  on  Electrical  Bio-­‐Impedance  (ICEBI)  and  the  XIVth  Conference  on  Electrical  Impedance  Tomography  2013  (EIT),  22-­‐25  April,  Heilbad  Heiligenstadt    K.S.  Rabbani,  S.  Parvin,  M.A.  Kadir  and  A.I.  Khan,  An  electrical  impedance  system  for  measuring  for  respiration  rate  of  babies  without  upsetting  the  subject.  (O)       (IPPS  BAN:04)    K.S.  Rabbani,  A.  Al-­‐Amin,  S.  Parvin,  M.A.  Kadir,  T.  Tahmid  and  S.K.  Alam,  Classification  of  breast  tumour  using  electrical  impedance.  (O)               (IPPS  BAN:04)    R.  Abir,  F.J.  Pettersen,  O.G.  Martinsen  and  K.S.  Rabbani,  Effect  of  a  spherical  object  in  4  electrode  Focused  Impedance  Method  (FIM):  measurement  and  simulation.  (O)       (IPPS  BAN:04)    Microscopy  Conference  (MC2013),  25-­‐30  August,  Regensburg    Jérémie   T.   Zoueu,   Calibration   of   multispectral   and   multimodal   light   emitting   diode   microscope   for  staining  free  malaria  automate  parasitemia  determination.  (O)       (IPPS  AFSIN)    8th  International  workshop  on  Multidimensional  (nD)  systems  (nDS13),  9-­‐11  September,  Erlangen    Zerz,  E.  &  B.Bekele.  A  solution  formula  for  finite  dimensional  systems.  (O)     (IPMS  ETH:01)    Ghana  5th  International  Toxicology  Symposium  in  Africa,  11-­‐14  September,  Kumasi    Mahugija,  JAM,  Schramm,  KW,  Henkelmann,  B,  Levels  and  patterns  of  organochlorine  pesticides  and  their  degradation  products  in  rainwater  in  Kibaha,  Tanzania.  (O)         (IPICS  ANCAP)    Honduras  First  Central  American  and  Caribbean  Landslide  Congress,  20-­‐22  March,  Tegucigalpa    Garcia-­‐Urquia,  E.  and  Axelsson,  K.,  Evaluation  of  the  Damages  of  Rainfall-­‐Induced  Landslides  in  Tegucigalpa,  Honduras.  (O)               (IPPS  NADMICA)    India  Indo-­‐UK  Perspectives  on  WaterQuality;  Threats,  Technologies  and  Options,  13-­‐14  Au.,  Bangalore    S.O.  Wandiga,  Water  quality  issues  in  Africa:  Chemical  sciences  can  offer  some  solutions.  (O)                         (IPICS  KEN:01)  

 78  

COMSOL  Conference  2013,  17–18  October,  Bangalore    M.A.  Kadir,  S.P.  Ahmed,  G.D.  Al  Quaderi,  R.  Rahman  and  K.S.  Rabbani,  Application  of  focused  impedance  method  (FIM)  to  determine  the  volume  of  an  object  within  a  volume  conductor.  (O)   (IPPS  BAN:04)    Asia  Pacific  Conference  on  Non-­‐Destructive  Testing,  18–22  November,  Mumbai    D.  M.  Maina,  S.  M.  Karanja,  M.  J.  Mangala  and  M.  J.  Gatari,  Radiographic  Evaluation  of  Quality  of  Welded  Joints  of  Fabricated  Products  in  Kenya’s  Informal  Sector.  (O)       (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Ireland  Workshop  “Research  challenges  &  opportunities  in  global  health”.  14-­‐15  Nov.,  Dublin    S.O.  Wandiga,  Critical  water  quality  issues  in  Africa:  Chemical  sciences  can  offer  some  solutions.  (O)                       (IPICS  KEN:01)    Italy  International  School  on  Recent  Advances  in  PDE  and  Applications,  17-­‐22  June,  Milan    Tamirat  Temesgen.  Analysis  of  Boundary-­‐Domain  Integral  Equations  for  Dirichlet  BVP  with  variable  coefficient  in  2D.  (P)                 (IPMS  ETH:01)    International  Conference  on  Mountains  and  Climate  Change,  23–25  October,  Lecco    Gatari  M.  J.,  Mt  Kenya  Ecosystem  and  Impact  of  Black  Carbon:  Implication  to  poverty  and  social  economic  dynamics  in  Kenya.  (O)                 (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Ivory  Coast  International  Workshop  on  Optical  System  Design,  Electronics  and  Computerized  Acquisition,  4-­‐14  November,  Yamoussoukro.    Sangare  M.,  Detection  test  of  various  stresses  and  diseases  of  tropical  plants  using  the  multi-­‐spectral  microscopy.  (O)                   (IPPS  MAL:01)    Diawara  M.,  Evaluation  of  DOAS  equipment.  (O)           (IPPS  MAL:01)  Memeu  D.M.,  A  Rapid  Malaria  Diagnostic  Method  Based  on  Automatic  Detection  and  Classification  of  Plasmodium  Parasites  in  Thin  Blood  Smear  Images.  (O)         (IPPS  AFSIN)    Omucheni  D.L.,  Multispectral  Imaging  of  Human  Blood  Media  Applied  to  Malaria  Diagnostics.  (O)                       (IPPS  AFSIN)    Japan  15th  International  Conference  on  Total  Reflection  X-­‐Ray  Fluorescence  and  related  Methods,  and  49th  Annual  Conference  on  X-­‐Ray  Chemical  Analysis,  23  –  27  September,  Osaka    Gatari  M.J.,  Mugoh  F.,  Njenga  L.W.,  Shepherd  K.D.,  Sila  A.,  Kamau  M.N.  ,  Maina  D.M.,  Prediction  of  soil  properties:  An  Experiment  using  Mt  Kenya  forest  Soils.  (O&P)       (IPICS  KEN:01)                       (IPPS  KEN:01/2)      Boman  J.,  Gaita  S.,  Pettersson  J.,  Hallquist  M.,  Gatari  M.  J.  and  Maina  D.  Is  TXRF  suitable  for  analysis  of  ambient  aerosols?  (O)                 (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Gatari  M.  J.,  Maina  D.  M.,  Wagner  A.,  Boman  J.,  Gaita  S.  M.  and  Bartilol  S.,  Waters  in  Lake  Victoria  basin:  Trace  elements  in  Kisumu  Watershed.  (P)             (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Kilavi  P.K.,  Maina  D.M.,  Gatari  M.  J.,  Wagner  A.,  Determination  of  Mn,  Fe,  Cu  and  Zn  in  indigenous  complementary  infant  flour  by  Total-­‐Reflection  X-­‐ray  Fluorescence.  (P)     (IPPS  KEN:01/2)        

 79  

Kenya  First  Kenyatta  Workshop  on  Mathematical  Modeling,  17-­‐  21  June,  Kenyatta  University,  Nairobi    Legesse  Lemecha,  Macroscopic  Traffic  Flow  Modeling  on  Round-­‐about  with  Buffer  and  Optimization,  Mathematical  Modeling.  (O)               (IPMS  ETH:01)    Second  Kenyatta  University  International  Mathematics  Conference,  17-­‐21  June,  Nairobi    Kasozi  J.,  MARM  contributions  to  scholarship  and  research  in  Uganda.  (O)     (IPMS  EAUMP)    J.  Nakakawa.  The  impact  of  malaria  disease  on  the  frequency  of  sickle  cell  gene.  (O)   (IPMS  EAUMP)    Workshop  on  Solar  PV  Curriculum  Development,  9-­‐13  July,  Naivasha    Waita  S.M.,  Simiyu  J.  and  Ogacho  A.  PV  Curriculum  development:  The  situation  at  the  Department  of  Physics,  University  of  Nairobi.  (O)               (IPPS  KEN:02)    Pedometric  Conference  at  World  Agroforestry  Centre,  26-­‐31  August,  ICRAF,  Nairobi    Mugo  M.F,  Njenga  W.  Lydia,  Gatari  JM  Michael,  Shepherd  D  Keith,  &  Sila  Andrew,  Prediction  of  Soil  Physiochemical  in  Mt.  Kenya  Using  MIR-­‐PLSR.  (O)           (IPICS  KEN:01)                       (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Mugo,  M.F.,  Njenga,  W.L.,  Gatari,  M.J.,  Shepherd,  D.K.,  &  Sila,  A.,  Statistics  and  mid  infrared  spectroscopy  in  predicting  properties  of  Mt.  Kenya  forest  soil.  (P)             (IPICS  KEN:01)                       (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    African  Laser  Centre  workshop,  8-­‐13  September,  ARC  Hotel,  Egerton  University    Z.  Birech.  Types  of  laser  sources  and  their  applications.  (O)         (IPPS  KEN:04)    Joint  Conference  27th  Soil  Science  Society  of  East  Africa  and  6th  Africa  Soil  Science  Society,  20–25  October,  Nakuru      Nyambura  M.,  Towett  E.K.,  Nyandika  H.,  Chacha  R.,  Shepherd  K.D.,  Gatari  M.J.,  Applicability  of  hand-­‐held  X-­‐ray  fluorescence  analyzer  for  rapid  characterization  of  soil  elemental  composit-­‐ions.  (O&P)                       (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Galgallo  A.H.,  Gatari  M.J.,  Maina  D.M.,  Shepherd  K.D.,  Nyambura  M.,  Nyandika  H.,  Karuga  S.,  Gichohi  B.  M.,  Trace  Elements  in  Soils  from  Tanzania:  Application  of  TXRF  Analysis.  (O&P)     (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Karuga  S.,  Gatari  M.  J.,  Maina  D.  M,  Shepherd  K.  D.,  Nyambura  M.,  Galgallo  A.,  Gichohi  B.  M.,  Uptake  of  Zinc  in  Sugarcanes:  An  Experiment  using  samples  from  Nairobi  River  Basin.  (O&P)   (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    1st  Young  Scientist  MSSEESA  Conf.  Materials  Sci.  and  Solar  Energy  Technol.,  28–29  Nov.,  Nairobi    A.  Ajuoga,  Ogacho,  J.  Mwabora  and  B.  Aduda,  Niobium  doped  TiO2  (Nb:TiO2):  Effects  of  doping  concentration  on  the  optical  properties  of  TiO2.  (O)         (IPPS  KEN:02)    A.  Alfred,  J.M.  Mwabora,  R.J.  Musembi,  S.M.  Waita,  Effects  of  oxygen  partial  pressure  and  subst-­‐rate  temperature  on  optical  properties  of  sputter  deposited  CuCrO2.  (O)       (IPPS  KEN:02)    S.  Ambonisye,  R.T.  Kivaisi,  M.E.  Samiji,  N.R.  Mlyuka,  Luminous  transmittance  and  transition  temperature  of  VO2:Ce  thin  films  prepared  by  DC  reactive  magnetron  sputtering.  (O)     (IPPS  MSSEESA)    M.G.  Asiimwe,  T.  Otiti,  and  J.M.  Mwabora,  Optical  and  electrical  properties  of  magnesium  doped  zinc  oxide  for  photovoltaic  application.  (O)             (IPPS  MSSEESA)        

 80  

C.O.  Ayieko,  B.O.  Aduda,  R.J.  Musembi,  S.M.  Waita,  P.K.  Jain,  Performance  of  TiO2/In(OH)xSy/  Pb(OH)xSy  composite  eta  solar  cell  fabricated  from  nitrogen  doped  TiO2  thin  film  window  layer.  (O)                       (IPPS  KEN:02)    J.P.  Eneku,  Otiti  Tom,  J.M.  Mwabora,  Fabrication  and  characterization  of  aluminium  and  gallium  mono  and  Co-­‐doped  zinc  oxide  thin  films  by  radio  frequency  sputtering  for  photovoltaic  applications.  (O)                       (IPPS  MSSEESA)    M.  Kineene,  J.  Simiyu,  M.  Munji,  Synthesis  and  characterization  of  niobium  oxide  thin  films  for  DSSC  application.  (O)                   (IPPS  MSSEESA)    M.  Kitui,  F.  Gaitho,  M.  Mghendi,  C.  Maghanga,  Optical  properties  of  TiO2  multilayer  thin  films:  Application  to  optical  filters.  (O)                 (IPPS  KEN:03)    N.  Komba,  J.  Buchweishaija,  Y.  M.M.  Makame,  Electrosynthesis  of  organic  polymer  films  using  1-­‐methoxy-­‐3-­‐pentadecylbenzene  derived  from  cashew  nut  shell  liquid.  (O)       (IPPS  MSSEESA)    C.J.  Lyobha,  R.  T.  Kivaisi,  N.  R.  Mlyuka  and  M.  E.  Samiji,  Effects  of  Aluminum  and  Tungsten  Co–doping  on  the  Optical  Properties  of  VO2  Based  Thin  Films.  (O)           (IPPS  MSSEESA)    D.  Magero,  N.W.  Makau,  G.O.  Amolo,  S  Lutta,  M.D.O.  Okoth,  J.M.  Mwabora,  R.  Musembi,  C.  Maghanga,  R.  Gateru,  Hydrogen  as  an  alternative  fuel:  An  ab-­‐initio  study  of  lithium  hydride  and  magnesium  hydride.  (O)                     (IPPS  KEN:03)      M.  Mageto,  C.M.  Maghanga,  M.  Mwamburi,  H.  Jafri,  G.A.  Niklasson,  C.G.  Granqvist.,  Transparent  and  conducting  TiO2:Nb  thin  films  prepared  by  spray  pyrolysis  technique.  (O)       (IPPS  KEN:03)    J.G.  Mbae,  M.  Munji,  R.J.  Musembi.,  Analysis  of  optimized  deposition  temperature  of  Zn:Al  thin  film  on  SnxSeyZnO:AlP-­‐N  junction  solar  cell.  (O)             (IPPS  MSSEESA)    V.  Mengwa,  N.W.  Makau,  G.O.  Amolo,  S  Lutta,  M.D.O.  Okoth,  J.M.  Mwabora,  R.  Musembi,  C.  Maghanga,  R.  Gateru,  A  Density  Functional  Theory  Study  of  Electronic  Structure  of  TiO2  Rutile  (110)  Surfaces  with  Catechol  Adsorbate.  (O).                 (IPPS  KEN:02)                       (IPPS  KEN:03)    V.  Mramba,  M.  Mageto,  F.  Gaitho,  B.V.  Odari,  R.  Musembi,  J.  Simiyu,  J.  Mwabora,  Preparation  and  characterization  of  transparent  and  conducting  doped  tin  oxide.  (O)     (IPPS  KEN:02)                       (IPPS  KEN:03)    A.K.  Mulu,  P.M.  Karimi,  R.J.  Musembi,  D.M.  Wamwangi,  Characterization  of  tin  doped  antimony  selenium  (Sn:SbxSe1.5x)  thin  film  for  phase  change  memory  applications.  (O)       (IPPS  MSSEESA)    W.  Mulwa,  N.W.  Makau,  G.O.  Amolo,  S  Lutta,  M.D.O.  Okoth,  J.M.  Mwabora,  R.  Musembi,  C.  Maghanga,  R.  Gateru,  Structural  and  Electronic  Properties  of  TiO2,  Nb:TiO2  and  Cr:TiO2:  A  First  Principles  Study.  (O)                       (IPPS  KEN:02)                       (IPPS  KEN:03)    S.  Mureramanzi,  An  investigation  on  the  output  stability  and  properties  of  photovoltaic  PEC  cells  using  semiconductor  thin  films  of  CdX(X=S,Se,Te)  electrophoretically  deposited  on  TiO2  substrate.  (O)                       (IPPS  KEN:02)    B.K.  Mutange,  P.M.  Karimi,  R.J.  Musembi,  D.M.  Wamwangi,  Characterization  of  indium  doped  tin  selenide  (In:SnxSey)  Thin  films  for  phase  change  memory  application.  (O)       (IPPS  MSSEESA)    J.  Mutasingwa,  J.  Buchweishaija,  J.E.G.  Mdoe,  J.E.G,  Aloe  secundiflora  extract  as  a  green  corrosion  inhibitor  for  carbon  steel  in  portable  water  systems.  (O)           (IPPS  MSSEESA)        

 81  

P.V.  Mwonga,  N.W.  Makau,  G.O.  Amolo,  S  Lutta,  M.D.O.  Okoth,  J.M.  Mwabora,  R.  Musembi,  C.  Maghanga,  R.  Gateru,  Ab-­‐initio  Studies  of  point  defects  in  TiO2:  A  density  functional  approach.  (O)   (IPPS  KEN:02)                       (IPPS  KEN:03)    J.  Ndungu,  F.W.  Nyongesa,  A.A.  Ogacho,  B.O.  Aduda,  Nanoporous  Ceramics  for  Water  Filtration.  (O)                       (IPPS  KEN:02)    N.  Nguu,  F.W  Nyongesa,  R.J.  Musembi,  B.O.Aduda,  Morphological  and  structural  characterization  of  TiO2/Nb2O5  composite  electrode  thin  films  synthesized  by  electrophoretic  deposition  (EPD)  technique.  (O)                     (IPPS  KEN:02)    S.  Ndonye,  R.J.  Musembi,  M.K.  Munji,  Effect  of  substrate  deposition  temperature  on  the  proper-­‐ties  of  Snx  Sey/ZnO:S.  (O)                   (IPPS  MSSEESA)    P.  K.  Nyaga,  R.  J.  Musembi,  M.K.  Munji,  Effect  of  Sn  Doping  on  the  electrical  properties  of  as  pre-­‐pared  and  annealed  ZnO  thin  films  prepared  by  reactive  evaporation.  (O)       (IPPS  MSSEESA)    B.V.  Odari,  M.  Mageto,  R.  Musembi,  H.  Othieno,  F.  Gaitho,  V.  Mramba,  Optical  and  electrical  properties  of  Pb  doped  SnO2  thin  films  deposited  by  spray  pyrolysis.  (O)         (IPPS  KEN:02)                       (IPPS  KEN:03)    E.R.  Ollotu,  M.E.  Samiji,  N.R.  Mlyuka,  R.T.  Kivaisi,  Influence  of  films  thickness  on  optical  proper-­‐ties  of  Nb-­‐doped  TiO2  (NTO)  thin  films  deposited  by  DC  reactive  magnetron  sputtering.  (O)   (IPPS  MSSEESA)    R.O.  Onchuru,  M.K.  Munji,  R.J.  Musembi,  Fabrication  and  characterization  of  TiO2/In(OH)xSy/  SnS  Composite  ETA  solar  cell.  (O)               (IPPS  MSSEESA)    R.V.M.  Otakwa,  J.M.  Mwabora,  J.  Simiyu,  The  Complementarity  of  Dye-­‐Sensitized  and  Amorphous  Silicon  Photovoltaics  in  Field  Application  in  the  Tropics.  (O)         (IPPS  KEN:02)    P.  Owino,  M.  Mwamburi,  S.  Kioko,  Design  and  Construction  of  a  Fishing  Light  Attractor  (oral).                       (IPPS  KEN:03)  L.  Pholds,  M.E.  Samiji,  N.R.  Mlyuka,  B.S.  Richards,  R.T.  Kivaisi,  Effect  of  substrate  temperature  on  the  structural,  optical  and  electrical  properties  of  DC  sputtered  ZnO:B  film.  (O)     (IPPS  MSSEESA)    B.  Samwel  N.R.,  Mlyuka,  M.  E.  Samiji,  and  R.  T.  Kivaisi,  Effects  of  Target  Composition  on  the  Optical  Constants  of  DC  Sputtered  ZnO:Al  Thin  Film.  (O)           (IPPS  MSSEESA)    J.  Simiyu,  Sizing  a  stand  alone  photovoltaic  electrical  solar  system  for  domestic  application.  (O)                       (IPPS  KEN:02)    M.  Tembo,  O.  Munyati,  S.  Hatwaambo,  M.  Maaza,  Efficiency  Enhancement  in  P3HT:PCBM  Blends  using  Squarylium  III  Dye.  (O)                 (IPPS  ZAM:01)    Assessing  Global  Challenges  at  the  Water  –  Health  Nexus  SGWI-­‐3rd  IWA  CONFERENCE  AND  EXHIBITION,  15  October,  Nairobi    Jane  Macharia,  Shem  Wandiga,  Lydia  Njenga  and  Vincent  Madadi,  Exploring  application  of  low  cost  water  purification  technologies  to  provide  safe  drinking  water  for  rural  communities  –  a  case  study  using  Moringa  oleifera  seeds  and  ceramic  filters.  (O)           (IPICS  KEN:01)    V.  Madadi,  A.  Gall,  S.O.  Wandiga,  B.J.  Mariñas,  J.  Shisler,  Y.  Lu,  A.J.  Rodrigues,  Addressing  water  quality  challenges  and  perspectives  –  collaborative  efforts  between  the  University  of  Nairobi,  Kenya  and  University  of  Illinois  at  Urbana  Champaign,  USA.  (O)         (IPICS  KEN:01)        

 82  

2nd  Stakeholders’  Workshop  on  Addressing  Drinking  Water  Quality  Challenges  In  Developing  Countries:  Case  Study  of  Lake  Victoria  Basin,  Bondo  District,  30-­‐31  May,  Kisumu    V.  Madadi,  S.O.  Wandiga,  Advances  in  water  purification  and  disinfection  technologies.  (O)                         (IPICS  KEN:01)    Mexico  International  Solar  Energy  Society  World  Congress,  3–7  November,  Cancun    Simiyu  J.,  Waita  S.M.,  Musembi  R.,  Ogacho  A.,  Aduda  B.,  Promoting  PV  uptake  and  sector  growth  in  Kenya  through  value  added  training  in  PV  sizing,  installation  and  maintenance.  (O)     (IPPS  KEN:02)    Kioko,  S.,  The  effect  of  temperature  on  a  monocrystalline  siliconsolar  cell  using  the  laser  beam  induced  current/voltage  system.  (O)               (IPPS  KEN:03)      S.  Kioko,  M.  Mwamburi,  Modelling  of  artifacts  and  the  effect  of  temperature  on  the  output  characteristics  of  a  monocrystalline  Silicon  Solar  cell  using  LBIC/LBIV  (O).         (IPPS  KEN:03)    Mongolia  CIMPA  Research  School,  15-­‐26  July,  Ulaanbaatar    Addisalem  Abathun,  Properties  of  Hypergeometric  Functions,  Hypergeometric  Functions  and  Representation  Theory.  (O)               (IPMS  ETH:01)    Morocco  2nd  International  Symposium  on  ”Analytical  Chemistry  for  a  Sustainable  Development-­‐ACSD  2013”,  and  4th  Federation  of  African  Societies  of  Chemistry  (FASC)  Congress,  7-­‐9  May,  Marrakesh    Kabore  Boukaré,  Issa  tapsoba,  Yvonne  Bonzi-­‐Coulibaly,  Analyse  électrochimique  et  suivi  de  la  décomposition  du  méthylparathion.  (P)             (IPICS  BUF  :01)    A.  Geto,  M.  Amare,  M.Tessema,  S.  Admassie,  Polymer-­‐modified  glassy  carbon  electrode  for  the  electrochemical  detection  of  quinine  in  human  urine  and  pharmaceutical  formulations.  (O)                         (IPICS  ETH:01)    Wilson  Tonkei,  Towards  development  of  an  electrochemical  sensor  for  detection  of  heavy  metals  in  wastewater  in  the  Second  International.  (O)           (IPICS  ANEC)    SM  Seck,  Modou  Fall,  S  Charvet  et  E  Baudrin,  Functionalization  of  nitrogenated  amorphous  carbon  thin  films  for  detection  of  heavy  metal  in  aqueous  solution.  (O)         (IPICS  ANEC)      B.  Kaboré,  S.  Ilboudo,  S.  Paré,  I.  Tapsoba,  A.M.  Toé,  Y.  Bonzi,  Square  wave  voltammetry  determi-­‐nation  of  fenitrothion  residues  in  soils  and  water  from  Burkina  Faso.  (P)       (IPICS  ANEC)    Francis  Tchieno,  A  L.  Tapondjou,  I.K.  Tonlé,  Electrochemical  determination  of  mangiferin  using  an  activated  chitosan  modified  carbon  paste  composite  electrode.  (P)       (IPICS  ANEC)    A.  Mars,  N.  Raouafi,  Ferrocene-­‐decorated  gold  nanoparticles  immunosensor  for  sensitive  amperometric  detection  of  human  immunoglobulin  G.  (O)           (IPICS  ANEC)      Myanmar  6th  Int.  Conf.  on  Science  and  Mathematics  Education  in  Dev.  Countries,  November  1–3,  Mandalay    Seam,  N.,  On  the  development  of  mathematics  in  developing  country.  (O)     (IPMS  CAB:01)        

 83  

The  Netherlands  Next  Generation  Organic  Photovoltaics,  June  2-­‐5,  Groningen    Zelalem  Abdissa,  Mats  Andersson,  Wendimagegn  Mammo,  Synthesis  of  conjugated  polymers  for  organic  solar  cells  using  direct  arylation  polycondensation.  (P)         (IPICS  ETH:01)    Norway  The  22nd  Society  for  Risk  Analysis-­‐Europe  Conference,  17–19  June,  Trondheim      Rivera  C,  Tehler  H.,  Analyzing  the  governance  of  disaster  risk  from  a  system  perspective:  A  case  study  in  Nicaragua.  (O)                   (IPPS  NADMICA)    Pakistan  Asian  Symp.on  Medicinal  Plants,  Species  and  Other  Natural  Prod.  (ASOMPS  XVI),  9-­‐13  Dec.,  Karachi    M.  Shoeb,  Bioactive  compounds  from  endophytic  fungi  of  Bangladesh.  (O)     (IPICS  BAN:04)    12th  International  &  24th  National  Chemistry  Conference,  28-­‐30  October,  Multan    M.  Shoeb,  Chemical  contaminants  in  agricultural  foodstuff  of  Bangladesh.  (O)   (IPICS  BAN:04)    Virtual  Education  Project  Pakistan,  1  November,  ICCBS,  Karachi    M.  Shoeb,  Chemical  contaminants  in  food  and  human  blood  samples  of  Bangladesh.  (O)                         (IPICS  BAN:04)    Poland  18th  EuroAnalysis  Conferenc,  25-­‐29  August,  Warszawa    Bellah  Pule,  Dye  incoporated  electrospun  fiber  for  colorimetric  detection  of  aspartate  aminotransferase.  (O)                     (IPICS  SEANAC)    Portugal  International  Conference  and  Advanced  School  Planet  Earth,  Mathematics  of  Energy  and  Climate  Change,  21-­‐28  March,  Lisbon    Semu  Mitiku,  Optimal  Self-­‐Protective  Measures  in  Controlling  Infectious  Diseases  of  Human  Population.  (O)                     (IPMS  ETH:01)    12th  Internat.  Conf.  on  Education  and  Training  in  Optics  and  Photonics,  22-­‐26  July,  Porto    Angeyo,  H,  Dehayem-­‐Massop,  A.,  Kaduki,  K.A.,  Development  of  laser  education  and  research  towards  biophotonics  at  Nairobi.  (O)               (IPPS  KEN:04  )    RIAO/OPTILAS  2013  VIII  Iberoamerican  Conference  on  Optics  and  XI  Latinamerican  Meeting  on  Optics,  Lasers  and  Applications,  22  –  26  July,  Porto    Angeyo,  H.K,  Mukhono,  P.M,  Musyoka,  D.,  Dehayem-­‐Massop,  A.,  Kaduki,  K.A.,  Trace  quantitative  and  exploratory  analysis  by  multivariate  chemometric  laser  induced  breakdown  spectrometry  applied  to  malaria  and  radiogeothermic  diagnostics.  (O)           (IPPS  KEN:04)    Lumminex  Samples  Event,  Portugal,  30-­‐31  October  2013    Milcah  Dhoro,  Genetic  variants  of  drug  metabolizing  enzymes  and  drug  transporter  (ABCB1)  as  possible  biomarkers  for  adverse  drug  reactions  in  an  HIV/AIDS  cohort  in  Zimbabwe.  (O)   (IPICS  AiBST)        

 84  

Rwanda  Active  Volcanism  &  Continental  Rifting  (AVCOR  2013)  Internat.  Workshop,  12-­‐15  Nov.,  Gisenyi    Ayele,  A.,  Recent  seismicity  of  the  Main  Ethiopian  and  implication  for  earthquake  and  volcanic  risks  (O).                     (IPPS  ETH:02)  South  Africa  XXth  AETFAT  Congress,  13-­‐17  January,  Stellenbosch    Ermias  Dagne.  Unique  bioresources  from  Ethiopia  with  applications  in  food,  medicine  and  cosmetics.  (O)                     (IPICS  ALNAP)    Africa  Array  Annual  Assembly,  18-­‐23  January,  Johannesburg    Ayele,  A.,  Current  capability  of  the  Ethiopian  seismic  station  network  to  understand  earthquake  and  volcano  hazards  in  the  region  and  mitigate  risks.  (O)         (IPPS  ETH:02)    5th  African  Digital  Scholarship  and  Curation  Conference,  26-­‐29  June,  Durban    Stanley  Mukanganyama,  State  of  Play:  Data  Sharing  in  Zimbabwe.  (O)     (IPICS  ZIM:01)      Indigenous  Plant  Use  Forum,  1-­‐4  July,  Nelspruit    B.  Moyo,  S.  Sithole,  R.Mangoyi,  T.  Chitemerere,  E.  Chirisa,  T.  Chimponda,  S.  Mukanganyama,  Inhibitory  effects  of  natural  plant  products  on  drug  efflux  augment  the  antimicrobial  and  anticancer  effects  inpathogenic  microbes  and  cancer  cells.  (O)           (IPICS  ZIM:01)    E.  Dagne.  Fate  of  Cathinone  in  Khat  Leaves.  (O)           (IPICS  ALNAP)    12th  International  Chemistry  Conference  in  Africa,  8-­‐12  July,  Johannesburg      Jacob  O  Midiwo.  Natural  Products  Research  in  search  of  drug  prototypes  against  tropical  diseases  from  African  medicinal  plants.  (O)               (IPICS  KEN:02)    Yeboah.  S.O.  and  M.Yulita,  Determination  of  the  position  and  type  of  unsaturation  in  fatty  acids  from  Ximenia  caffra  and  Sterculia  africana  seed  oils  using  GC-­‐MS.  (O)       (IPICS  NABSA)    Desta,  R.R.T.  Majinda,  Flavonoids  from  the  stem  bark  of  Erythrina  caffra.  (O)     (IPICS  NABSA)    N.  Keroletswe,  R.R.T.  Majinda,  Phytochemical  analysis  on  Tyloserma  esculentum  tuber.  (O)                         (IPICS  NABSA)    M.N.  Abubakar,  R.R.T.  Majinda,  A  new  flavonoid  and  other  constituents  from  Albizia  adianthifolia  stem  wood.  (O)                   (IPICS  NABSA)    South  African  National  Space  Agency  Monthly  Meeting,  29  August,  Pretoria    E.B.  Amabayo,  Characterisation  of  ionospheric  irregularities  over  Uganda.  (O)   (IPPS  UGA:02)    6th  MIM  Pan-­‐African  Malaria  Conference,  Moving  towards  Malaria  elimination:  Investing  in  Research  and  Control,  9-­‐11  October,  Durban    L.K.  Omosa,  J.O.  Midiwo,  H.Akala,  The  relationship  between  antioxidant  and  antiplasmodial  relationship  of  compounds  from  Dodonaea  angustifolia  and  Senecio  roseiflorus.  (O)     (IPICS  KEN:02)    Combating  Scientific  Misconduct  and  Research  Irregularities  Summit,  23-­‐25  Oct.,  Johannesburg    Stanley  Mukanganyama,  Scientific  fraud:  Experiences  from  the  laboratory  bench  to  some  recommendations  for  basicscientific  research.  (O)           (IPICS  ZIM:01)  

 85  

South  African  Mathematical  Society  (SAMS)  30  Oct.  -­‐  1  Nov.,  University  of  KwaZulu-­‐Natal    Crisper  Chileshe,  On  The  Elementary  and  Basic  Characters  of  G_n.  (O)       (IPMS  EAUMP)    Wallace  Haziyu,  Construction  of  a  manifold  structure  on  the  quotient  of  a  manifold  by  a  lie  group.  (O)                       (IPMS  EAUMP)    J.  Nakakawa.  The  impact  of  malaria  disease  on  the  frequency  of  sickle  cell  gene.  (O)   (IPMS  EAUMP)    Reg.  Workshop  on  Materials  Science  for  Energy  Conversion,  4-­‐8  Nov.,  iThemba  Labs,  Cape  Town    A.A.  Ogacho,  A.  Belaidi,  Th.  Dittrich,  R.J.  Musembi,  and  B.O.  Aduda,  Surface  Passivation  of  Ultrathin  Nanoporous  TiO2  for  Photovoltaic  Application.  (O)           (IPPS  KEN:02)    6th  African  Laser  Centre  student  workshop,  21-­‐24  November,  Cape  town      Birech  Z.,  Ultrafast  dynamics  of  excited  states  in  molecular  crystals:  The  case  of  tetracene  ultrathin  single  crystals.  (O)                   (IPPS  KEN:04)  Southern  Africa  Mathematical  Sciences  Association  (SAMSA),  25-­‐29  November,  Cape  Town.    Mooto  Nawa,  Comparison  of  the  EM  algorithm  and  the  quasi-­‐Newton  method:  an  application  to  mixtures  of  developmental  projections.  (O)               (IPMS  EAUMP)    Kelvin  Muzundu,  Generalised  Domination  in  Ordered  Banach  Algebras.  (O)     (IPMS  EAUMP)    Kasozi  J.,  Dividend  maximisation  under  a  ruin  constraint  in  a  surplus  process  compounded  with  a  constant  force  of  interest.  (O)               (IPMS  EAUMP)    Spain  10th  Int.  Symp.  on  Polymer  Therapeutics  from  Laboratory  to  Clinic,  19-­‐21  May,  Valencia    C.  Masimirembwa,  The  challenge  of  diseases  of  poverty  and  what  drug  delivery  technologies  can  achieve.  (O)       (IPICS  AiBST)    24th  International  Meeting  on  Probabilistic,  Combinatorial  and  Asymptotic  Methods  for  the  Analysis  of  Algorithms,  27-­‐31  May  27-­‐31,  Cala  Galdana,  Menorca    Hun  Kanal.  [Title  not  given].  (P)         (IPMS  CAB:01)    Sudan  15th  Symposium  of  the  Natural  Products  Research  Network  for  Eastern  and  Central  Africa  (NAPRECA),  3-­‐10  December,  Khartoum    Abiy  Yenesew  et  al.,  Larvicidal  activities  of  extracts  and  rotenoids  from  Millettia  usaramensis  on  Aedes  aegypti.  (O)                   (IPICS  KEN:02)    N.  Abdissa  et  al.,  Antiplasmodial  quinones  from  the  roots  of  Kniphofia  foliosa.  (O)   (IPICS  KEN:02)    O.E.  Kenanda,  J.O.  Midiwo,  L.  Kerubo,  A.  Ndakala,  Synthesis  and  biological  evaluation  of  pyrazo-­‐line  derivatives  from  chalcones  of  Polygonum  senegalense  as  possible  anti-­‐microbial  agents.  (O)                         (IPICS  KEN:02)    Penelope  Tambama,  Orbert  Chiramba,  Berhanu  Abegaz  and  Stanley  Mukanganyama,  The  induction  of  a  pro-­‐oxidant  status  as  a  possible  mechanism  of  the  action  of  anticancer  natural  products  against  Jurkat  T  cells  in  vitro.  (O)                   (IPICS  ZIM:01)    Ermias  Dagne.  Three  decades  of  contribution  to  the  study  of  the  biodiversity  of  Ethiopia.  (O)                       (IPICS  ALNAP)        

 86  

Sweden  International  Association  Hydrological  Sciences,  Joint  Assembly,  22-­‐26  July,  Gothenburg    Guerrero,  J.-­‐L.,  Westerberg,  I.K.,  Halldin,  S.  ,  Xu,  C.-­‐Y.,  Lundin,  L.-­‐C.,  Robust  parameters  and  assessment  of  structural  uncertainty  in  hydrological  models  using  a  depth  function.  (O)     (IPPS  NADMICA)    Present  status  and  future  challenges,  "Knowledge  for  the  future",  22-­‐26  July  2013,  Gothenburg    S.  Pare,  L.Y.  Bonzi-­‐Coulibaly.  Water  quality  issues  in  West  and  Central  Africa.  (O)   (IPICS  BUF:01)  Forum  för  Naturkatastrofer,  16  October,  Stockholm    Quesada  Montano,  B.,  Extreme  hydro-­‐meteorological  events  in  Central  America  related  to  climate  variability.  (P)                   (IPPS  NADMICA)    Soto,  A.,  Disasters  data:  different  source,  different  picture.  (P)       (IPPS  NADMICA)    Switzerland  Environment  and  Health,  Bridging  South,  North,  East  and  West,  Joint  ISEE,  ISES  and  ISIAQ  Environmental  Health  Conference,  19-­‐23  August,  Basel    Ngenoh,  J.  K.,  Gatari,  M.J.G.,  Maina,  D.M.,  Njenga,  L.W.,  Traffic  and  mineral  dust  impact  on  air  quality  in  Nairobi,  Kenya.  (O)                 (IPICS  KEN:01)                       (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Gatari  M.  J.,  Kivaya  V.,  Boman  J.,  Maina  D.  M.,  Wagner  A.,  Black  carbon,  trace  elements  and  parti-­‐culate  matter  measured  at  Jomo  Kenyatta  International  Airport-­‐Nairobi.  (P)     (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Second  WHO  Global  Forum  on  Medical  Devices,  22-­‐24  November,  Geneva    S.  Parvin,  A.I.  Khan,  K.  Hossain,  M.A.  Kadir  and  K.S.  Rabbani,  An  electrical  impedance  based  neonatal  respiration  monitor  for  pneumonia  detection.  (P)           (IPPS  BAN:04)      K.S.  Rabbani,  Importance  of  indigenous  R&D  and  manufacture  of  medical  devices  in  the  light  of  Bangladesh  experience.  (O)               (IPPS  BAN:04)    K.S.  Rabbani,  A  low  cost  mechanical  prosthetic  hand,  Second  WHO  Global  Forum  on  Medical  Devices.  (video/O)                   (IPPS  BAN:04)    K.S.  Rabbani,  On  regulatory  policies  for  medical  devices  in  low-­‐resource  countries.  (P)                       (IPPS  BAN:04)    Tanzania  ANCAP  Symposium,  4-­‐7  January,  University  of  Dar  es  Salaam    Vincent  Madadi,  Shem  O.  Wandiga  and  Paul  M.  Shiundu,  Degradation  studies  of  lindane  in  amended  and  non  amended  soils  from  Lake  Victoria  drainage  Basin.  (O)          (IPICS  KEN:01)    Global  Water  Quality  Summit.  29  Jan-­‐2  February,  Arusha  ,Tanzania    S.O.  Wandiga.  Climate  change/variability:  Definition,  causes  and  impacts.  (O)   (IPICS  KEN:01)    A.J.  Rodrigues,  F.O.  Odundo,  S.O.  Wandiga,  Community  perspectives:  Addressing  drinking  water  quality  challenges  in  Bondo  District,  Lake  Victoria  Basin.  (O)         (IPICS  KEN:01)    Vincent  Madadi,  A.  Gall,  J.  Shisler,  Y.  Lu,  B.J.  Mariñas,  S.O  Wandiga,  Advances  in  waterborne  viral  pathogen  control  and  sensing.  (O)                 (IPICS  KEN:01)        

 87  

Sida-­‐SAREC  Regional  Collaboration  Conf.  and  Ann.  General  Meeting,  31  July-­‐2  Aug.,  Bagamoyo  Nambela,  L,  Mahugija,  JAM,  Levels  and  chemodynamics  of  pesticide  residues  in  Lake  Tanganyika  Basin,  Tanzania.  (O)                   (IPICS  ANCAP)        Kabelege,  H,  Mgina,  CA,  Pesticidal  activities  of  natural  products  from  Clematopsis  scabiosifolia  and  Elephantopus  scabe.  (O)                 (IPICS  ANCAP)    Thailand  3rd  NRCT-­‐IFS  Workshop,  28  Nov-­‐4  Dec.,  Bangkok    Chunn,  T.  and  Heng,  S.,  Identification  and  quantification  of  some  main  volatile  compounds  in  rice  spirit  in  Cambodia.  (O)                   (IPICS  CAB:01)    Heng,  S.,  Identification  and  quantification  of  some  main  volatile  compounds  in  rice  spirit  in  Cambodia.  (P)                     (IPICS  CAB:01)    Md.  Iqbal  Rouf  Mamun,  Organic  Pollutants  in  Food  and  Human  Blood  Samples  of  Bangladesh.  (O)                       (IPICS  BAN:04)    Mohammad  Shoeb,  Isolation  and  structure  elucidation  of  bioactive  compounds  from  endophytic  fungi.  (O)                     (IPICS  BAN:04)    Pen,  S.,  Effects  of  pre  rigor  stretching  on  meat  tenderness  development.  (P)     (IPICS  CAB:01)    Tieng,  S.,  Qualitative  and  Quantitative  Study  of  Cyanide  in  Bamboo  shoot  (Bamboosa  multiplex)  in  Cambodia.  (P)                   (IPICS  CAB:01)    Tith,  S.  and  Tieng,  S.,  Study  of  Cyamide  in  Bamboo  Shoot  (Bambusa  multiplex)  in  Kandal  and  Kampong  Cham  Province,  Cambodia.  (O)               (IPICS  CAB:01)    Turkey  Solar  Energy  for  World  Peace,  17-­‐19  August,  Istanbul    R.  Musembi,  B.  Aduda,  J.  Mwabora,  Effect  recombination  on  series  resistance.  (P)   (IPPS  KEN:02)    J.  Simiyu,  S.  Waita,  C.  Obure,  R.  Musembi,  A.  Ogacho,  B.  Aduda,  Custom-­‐made,  cultural  identity  blended  training  in  PV  sizing,  installation  and  maintenance  in  Kenya.  (P)       (IPPS  KEN:02)    Uganda  6th  International  Nitrogen  Conference.  N2013,  18-­‐2  2December,  Kampala    E.  Odada,  S.O.  Wandiga,  V.Madadi,  G.  Wafula,  EADN  measurements  of  atmospheric  ozone,  nitro-­‐gen,  sulphur  compounds  in  dry  deposition  in  the  equatorial  African  Great  Lakes.  (O)   (IPICS  KEN:01)    United  Kingdom  (UK)  SETAC  Europe  23rd  Annual  Meeting,  12-­‐16  May,  Glasgow    Md.   Iqbal   Rouf   Mamun,   Residues   of   DDT   and   its   metabolites   in   food   and   environmental   samples   of  Bangladesh.  (P)                   (IPICS  BAN:04)    University  of  Aberdeen  Annual  Catchment  Summer  School,  25–30  August,  Aberdeen    Reynolds  Puga,  E.,  Water  Balance  Modeling  in  the  Upper  Basin  above  Lake  Alajuela,  Panama  (P).                         (IPPS  NADMICA)        

 88  

USA  American  Physical  Society  March  Meeting,  18–22  March,  Baltimore    Mulugeta  Bekele,  Tolosa  Adugna,  Lemi  Demeyu  and  Tatek  Yergou,  Converting  an  engine  driven  by  non-­‐uniform  temperature  to  one  driven  by  load.  (P)           (IPPS  ETH:01)    Workshop  on  Combinatorics,  Multiple  Dirichlet  Series  and  Analytic  Number  Theory,  5-­‐9  April,  Brown  University,  Providence,  Rhode  Island.    H.L.  Geleta.  Some  results  involving  series  representation  of  the  2nd  order  zeta  function.  (O)                         (IPMS  ETH:01)    International  Conference  in  Combinatorics,  Multiple  Dirichlet  Series  and  Analytic  Number  Theory,  15-­‐19  April,  Brown  University,  Providence,  Rhode  Island    H.L.Geleta.  Series  representation  of  second  order  zeta  functions.  (P)       (IPMS  ETH:01)    21st  Ann.  meeting  Int.  Soc.  Magnetic  Resonance  in  Medicine  (ISMRM),  20-­‐26  April,  Salt  Lake  City    S.M.  Hoque,  Y.  Huang,  S.  Maritim,  D.  Coman  and  F.  Hyder,  Characterization  of  Fe-­‐Co  Ferrite  Nanoparticles  for  Contrast  Generation  and  Heat  Therapy  in  Cancer.  (O)         (IPPS  BAN:02)    S.  Maritim,  D.  Coman,  Y.  Huang,  S.M.  Hoque,  and  F.  Hyder,  Molecular  Imaging  Beyond  Contrast  Generation:  Utility  of  BIRDS.  (P)                 (IPPS  BAN:02)   Z.  Mahbub,  K.S.Rabbani,  A.  Peters,  O.  Mougin,  P.Gowland,  Measurement  of  Magnetization  trans-­‐fer  in  the  Brachial  Plexus:  comparison  with  T2  and  Diffusion  Effects.  (O)       (IPPS  BAN:04)    61st  Meeting  of  the  American  Society  for  Mass  Spectrometrists  (ASMS),  9-­‐136  July,  Minneapolis    Kwenga  Sichilongo.  Evaluation  of  Factors  that  affect  the  sensitivity  of  sulfonamides  in  electrospray  ionization  mass  spectrometry.  (P)             (IPICS  SEANAC)    P.  Kolanyane,  I.Masesane,  K.Sichilongo.  Behaviour  of  chloramphenicol,  thiamphenicol  and  florfenicol  in  methanol  solution  for  LC-­‐MS  and  implications  on  their  detectability  in  complex  matrices.  (P)                         (IPICS  SEANAC)    Ecological  Society  of  America,  98th  Annual  Meeting  and  Exposition,  4-­‐9  August,  Minneapolis    L.  Prihodko,  Y.  Desaterik,  A.  Ba,  O.  Maïga,  Nutrient  subsidies  in  a  West  African  savanna:  Assessing  teleconnections  through  fire  and  dust  contributions.  (P)         (IPPS  MAL:01)    IGAC-­‐IGBP  Workshop  on  Developing  a  Strategic  Framework  for  Integrated  Programs  on  Air  Pollution  and  Climate  Change,  5-­‐7  November,  Boulder    Gatari  M.J.,  Air  Pollution  and  Climate  Research  in  Africa:  Challenges  from  lack  of  Funding,  Infrastructure  and  Education  System.  (O)               (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    American  Geological  Union,  Fall  Meeting,  9–13  December,  San  Fransisco    V.  Conde,  SO2  degassing  from  Turrialba  Volcano  linked  to  seismic  signatures  during  the  period  2008–2012.  (P)                   (IPPS  NADMICA)    Vietnam  3rd  Conference  on  Applied  and  Engineering  Physics,  08-­‐12  October,  Hué,  Vietnam    T.   Sriv,   C.   Sahakthun,   &   S.   Rainy,   Feasibility   Study   of   Bio-­‐Energy   Conversion   from   Sugarcane:   A   Case  Study  in  Five  Potential  Provinces  in  Cambodia.  (P)           (IPPS  CAM:01)    

 89  

Zambia  6th  SETAC  AFRICA  CONFERENCE,  2-­‐3  September,  Lusaka    Simon  N.  Mbugua,  Water  Purification  by  Tungsten-­‐doped  Titania  Nanonoparticles:  Towards  Overcoming  Water  Quality  Challenges.  (O)               (IPICS  KEN:01)    Vincent  Madadi,  Shem  Wandiga  and  Paul  Shiundu,  Organochlorine  pesticide  contamination  in  tropical  soils.  (O)                   (IPICS  KEN:01)    M.O.  Munyati,  Nano-­‐particled  thin  films  for  low  cost  chemical  sensor  applications:  preparation,  characterization  and  application.  (O)             (IPICS  ZAM:01)  B  Mateyo,  M  O  Munyati,  Carbon  monoxide  gas  sensor  based  on  polyaniline  films  as  active  layers  comprising  nano-­‐particles.  (P)               (IPICS  ZAM:01)    C.  Teta,  T.  Hihwa.  Heavy  metal  contamination  of  Richmond  Landfill  in  Bulawayo  and  surrounding  groundwater  quality.  (O)                 (IPICS  ZIM:02)    C.  Teta,  Y.S.  Naik,  Feminization  of  male  tilapia  in  peri-­‐urban  dams  in  Bulawayo.  (O)   (IPICS  ZIM:02)    C.  Teta,  T.  Hihwa.  Urbanization,  poor  liquid  waste  management  and  environmental  effects  in  developing  countries:  A  case  study  of  Bulawayo,  Zimbabwe.  (O)         (IPICS  ZIM:02)    M.  Ndabambi,  Basopo  N.,  Y.S.  Naik,  The  effect  of  Pappea  capensis  methanoic  extract  on  esterase  enzymes  in  two  aquatic  snails.  (O)                 (IPICS  ZIM:02)    N.  Basopo,  M.  Ndabambi,  J.B.  Change,  Effects  of  hair  shampoos  on  the  antioxidant  enzyme  activities  of  aquatic  organisms,  freshwater  snail  Helisoma  duryi  and  the  bream  Oreochromis  mossambicus.  (P)                       (IPICS  ZIM:02)    N.  Basopo,  M.  Ndabambi,  A.N.  Dera.  Comparison  of  metal  residue  levels  in  two  dams  found  in  Bulawayo,  Zimbabwe  and  effects  of  the  metals  on  selected  enzymes  in  Oreochromis  niloticus.  (P)(IPICS  ZIM:02)    N.  Basopo,  M.  Ndabambi,  C.  Mtetwa.  Effects  of  chloryrifos  and  mercury  on  selected  enzymes  of  the  freshwater  snail  Lymnaea  natalensis.  (O)             (IPICS  ZIM:02)    YS  Naik,  N  Sithole,  C  Teta,  The  potential  teratogenic  effects  of  flush  toilet  detergents  and  fragrances  to  freshwater  Zebra  fish  (Danio  rerio).  (O)             (IPICS  ZIM:02)    Arinaitwe,  AK,  Muir,  DM,  Kiremire,  BT,  Fellin,  PF,  Teixeira,  CT,  Li,  HL,  Baseline  data  on  the  common  brominated  and  alternative  flame  retardants  from  air  samples  from  Lake  Victoria  watershed,  East  Africa.  (O)                     (IPICS  ANCAP)    Arinaitwe,  AK,  Muir,  DM,  Kiremire,  BT,  Fellin,  PF,  Li,  HL,  Harner,  TH,  Hecky,  RH,  Teixeira,  CT,  Wasswa,  JW,  Ambient  air  levels  and  wet  deposition  measurements  of  PCBs,  organochlorine  and  currently  used  pesticides  in  samples  from  watershed  of  Lake  Victoria,  Uganda.  (O)       (IPICS  ANCAP)    Ntirushize,  B,  Analysis  for  organochlorine  pesticide  residues  in  honey  from  Kabale  District-­‐South  Western  Uganda.  (O)                   (IPICS  ANCAP)    Madadi,  VO,  Shiundu,  M,  Wandiga,  SO,  Organochlorine  pesticide  contamination  in  tropical  soils-­‐Case  study  of  Kenya.  (O)                   (IPICS  ANCAP)    Mahugija,  JAM,  Schramm,  KW,  Henkelmann,  B,  Levels  and  patterns  of  organochlorine  pesticides  and  their  degradation  products  in  rainwater  in  Kibaha,  Tanzania.  (O)         (IPICS  ANCAP)    Zaranyika,  MF,  Dzomba,  P,  Degradation  of  pesticides  in  the  aquatic  environment:  Characterization  in  terms  of  a  rate  model  that  takes  into  account  hydrolysis,  photolysis,  microbial  degradation  and  adsorption  of  the  pesticide  by  colloidal  and  sediment  particles.  (O)       (IPICS  ANCAP)    

 90  

Kimbokota,  F,  Torto,  N,  Candidate  attractants  fro  Bactrocera  invadens  (Diptera:  Tephritidae)  male  flies  from  Gynandropsis  gynandra.  (O)               (IPICS  ANCAP)    Wasswa,  J,  Kiremire,  BT,  Development  of  a  mechanistic  fate  model  for  chlorpyrifos  and  endosulfan  in  a  water-­‐sediment  system.  (O)               (IPICS  ANCAP)    Mgina,  CA,  Mulungu,  LS,  Ndilahomba,  B,  Nyange,  CJ,  Mwatawala,  MW,  Mwalilino,  JK,  Joseph,  CC,  Natural  pesticides  efficacy  against  larger  grain  borer  (Prostephanus  truntatus)  and  maize  weevil  (Sytophilus  zeamays)  grain  seeds.  (P)                 (IPICS  ANCAP)    Vincent,  OA,  Chacha,  M,  Mmochi,  AJ,  Production  of  biofuels  from  tropical  seaweeds.  (O)                         (IPICS  ANCAP)    UNZA  Open  day,  Public  Seminars,  Department  of  Chemistry,  16  August,  Lusaka    B  Mateyo  and  M  O  Munyati,  Carbon  monoxide  gas  sensor  based  on  polyaniline  films  as  active  layers  comprising  nano-­‐particles.  (P)               (IPICS  ZAM:01)    Zimbabwe  The  Biochemistry  and  Molecular  Biology  Society  of  Zimbabwe  (BMBSZ)  Symposium,  Harare    C.  Teta,  Y.S.  Naik.  Biochemical  &  molecular  markers  of  estrogenic  environmental  pollutants.  (O)                       (IPICS  ZIM:02)    M.  Ndabambi,  Y.S.  Naik,  The  effect  of  Cammiphora  africana  methanoic  extract  on  glutathione  metabolism  and  esterase  enzymes  in  two  aquatic  snails.  (O)           (IPICS  ZIM:02)    Annual  Research  Days,  NUST,  28-­‐29  Aug,  Bulawayo    M.  Ndabambi.  Species  difference  in  snail  response  to  a  candidate  molluscicide  Acacia  karroo.  (O)                       (IPICS  ZIM:02)      

                           Professor  Ermias  Dagne,  Department  of  Chemistry,  Addis  Ababa  University,  Ethiopia,  coordinator  of  IPICS  ANRAP,  reviewing  results  with  a  chemistry  student.  (Courtesy  of  ISP)    

 91  

6.4.2     Arranged  conferences,  workshops,  training  courses,  and  other  meetings      Table  19.  Countries  where  meetings  were  arranged,  with  research  groups  or  scientific  networkswere  as  organizers  or  co-­‐organizers.  Number  of  meetings  (No)  is  indicated,  as  well  as  total  number  of  participants  (part.)  when  reported.  (S.Am.  –  South  America)  Region   Country   IPICS   IPMS   IPPS   Total       No   part.   No   part.   No   part.   No   part.  Africa   Botswana   2   42           2   42  Africa   Burkina  Faso   2   315   1   21   1   >8   4   >94  Africa   Eritrea           1   >20   1   >20  Africa   Ethiopia   1   3           1   3  Africa   Ivory  Coast           1   60   1   60  Africa   Kenya   3   68   1   48   11   371   15   487  Africa   Morocco   1   8       1   30   2   38  Africa   Rwanda       1   20   1   300   2   320  Africa   Senegal       1   60       1   60  Africa   South  Africa           1   >200   1   >200  Africa   Sudan   2   240           2   240  Africa   Tanzania   2   34   1   40       3   74  Africa   Uganda       1   40       1   40  Africa   Zambia   2   76       2   >30   4   >106  Africa   Zimbabwe   3   55       1   37   4   92  Asia   Bangladesh   7   433       1   70   8   503  Asia   Cambodia   5   462       2   280   7   742  Asia   Laos   2   39           2   39  Asia   Nepal   2   408           2   408  S.Am.   Bolivia   3   240           3   240  S.Am.   Chile   1   21           1   21  All  countries   38   2,444   6   229   23   >1,406   67   >4,079    Bangladesh  Meeting  for  creating  awareness  among  farmers,  Kaligonj,  Jhinedah,  23  Jun.  (150  part).  (IPICS  BAN:04)    48th  NITUB  Training  Programme  on  Common  Medical  Instruments,  BIRDEM  &  BUHS,  29  Jun.-­‐04  Jul.  (8  part.)                     (IPICS  NITUB)  49th  NITUB  Training  Program  on  HPLC,  BCSIR,  Dhaka,  24-­‐29  Aug.  (19  part.)     (IPICS  NITUB)    Workshop  on  Research  and  Service  Facilities  of  Atomic  Energy  Centre,  29  Aug.,  Dhaka.  (70  part.)                       (IPPS  BAN:02)    50th  NITUB  Training  Programme  on  Basic  Electronics,  NITUB  office,  14-­‐19  September.  (15  part.)                       (IPICS  NITUB)    51st  NITUB  Training  Programme  on  Common  Laboratory  Equipment,  BAU,  Mymenshingh,  30  November-­‐05  December.  (32  part.)                 (IPICS  NITUB)    The  9th  ANRAP  National  Seminar  on  “Antidiabetic  Plant  Materials  Separation  Techniques  and  Biological  Testing,  16  November,  BUHS,  Dhaka.  (200  part.)           (IPICS  ANRAP)    The  4th  ANRAP  Workshop  on  “Chemical  and  Biological  Studies  on  Bioactive  Plant  Materials”,  17-­‐22  Nov.    (9  part.)                     (IPICS  ANRAP)    Bolivia  Course  on  Insect-­‐Plant  Interactions,  10-­‐12  Nov.,  Cochabamba.  (25  part.)     (IPICS  LANBIO)      4thh  Natl.  Congress  of  Entomology,  13-­‐15  Nov.,  Cochabamba.  (190  part.)     (IPICS  LANBIO)    Course  on  Insect-­‐Plant  Interactions,  16-­‐17  Novr,  Sucre.  (25  part.)       (IPICS  LANBIO)  

 92  

Botswana  Seminar  on  Applic.  of  the  NMR  technique  in  Natural  Products  Chemistry  by  Prof.  B.T.  Ngadjui  (Org.  Chem.  Dept.,  Univ.  Yaoundé  1,  Cameroon)  at  Dept.  Chem.,  Univ.  Botswana,  2  Jun.  (20  part.)   (IPICS  NABSA)    Workshop  on  Natural  Products  Chemistry,  Dept.  Chem.,  UB,  28  Jun.  (22  part.)     (IPICS  NABSA)    Burkina  Faso  Workshop,  March,  Ouagadougou,  Burkina  Faso.  (21  part.)         (IPMS  BURK:01)    4th  International  Conference  on  Biofuel,  21  -­‐23  Nov.,  Ouagadougou.  Prof.  Alfred  S.  TRAORE  was  a  co-­‐organizer  on  the  behalf  of  the  Ministry  of  Energy.  (250  part.)       (IPICS  RA  Biotech)    ISP  BUF  Physics  project  presentation  and  scientific  exchanges,  12-­‐14  December,  Ouagadougou  (>8  participants).                   (IPPS  BUF:01)    Journées  de  partage  d’expériences  sur  les  Bio-­‐pesticides,  17-­‐18  Dec.,  Univ.  Ouagadougou.  Among  participants  were  19  farmers  including  6  women.  (65  part.)           (IPICS  BUF  :01)    Cambodia  Seminar  by  students  about  the  result  of  their  training  at  Dhaka  Univ.  Bangladesh,  5  Mar.,  RUPP.  (30  part)                     (IPICS  CAB:01)    Training  on  new  Atomic  Absorption  Spectrometer  (Varian  Spectra  240)  with  flame  and  graphite  furnace  system,  25  Mar.-­‐5  Apr.,  Dept.  Chem.,  RUPP.  (14  part.)         (IPICS  CAB:01)    Defence  of  student's  theses  and  poster  presentation  seminar,  24  Jun.,  Dept.  Chem.,  RUPP.  (120  part.)                       (IPICS  CAB:01)    4th  Symposium  of  Cambodian  Chemical  Society  with  the  theme  “Chemistry  and  Life”,  29-­‐30  Aug.,  Royal  Academy  of  Cambodia.  (268  part)               (IPICS  CAB:01)      2nd  Workshop  on  Natural  Science,  21  Oct.,  RUPP,  Phnom  Penh.  (60  part.)     (IPICS  CAB:01)                       (IPPS  CAM:01)    3rd  Academic  Conference  on  Natural  Science  for  Master  and  PhD  Students  from  ASEAN  Countries,  11-­‐15  Nov.,  Phnom  Penh.  (250  part.).                 (IPPS  CAM:01)    Chile  Course  on  Phylogenetic  Methods.  (21  part.)             (IPICS  LANBIO)    Eritrea  ESARSWG  Bulletin  workshop,  14-­‐18  Oct.,  Asmara,  Eritrea.  (>20  part.)       (IPPS  ESARSWG)    Ethiopia  Special  topics  in  electrochemical  characterization  of  conducting  polymers,  Dept.  Chemistry,  AAU,  15  Nov.–30  Dec.  (3  part)                   (IPICS  ETH:01)    Ivory  Coast  International  Workshop  on  Optical  System  Design,  Electronics  and  Computerized  Acquisition,  4–14  Nov.r,  Yamoussoukro.  (60  part.)                 (IPPS  AFSIN)    Kenya  1st  Solar  Academy:  Training  in  Photovoltaics,  16-­‐25  Apr.,  Nairobi.  (26  part.)     (IPPS  KEN:02)    ANSOLE  mini  symposium  in  Kenya,  9  May,  Nairobi.  (35  participants)       (IPPS  KEN:02)    2nd  Stakeholders  Inception  Workshop  Addressing  Drinking  Water  Quality  Challenges  in  Developing  Countries:  Case  Study  of  Lake  Victoria  Basin,  30-­‐31  May,  Bondo  District.  (34  part.)   (IPICS  KEN:01)  

 93  

GC-­‐MS,  AAS  and  HPLC  training  workshop,  8-­‐17  Jul.,  Dept.  Chemistry,  UoNBI,  Nairobi.  (16  part)                         (IPICS  KEN:01)    The  East  African  School  on  Applicable  Algebraic  Geometry,  8-­‐26  Jul.,  Bandari  College,  Mombasa.  (48  part.)                       (IPMS  EAUMP)    Workshop  on  Spectroscopy  Instrumentation,  12  Jul.,  ICRAF,  INST,  UoNBI.  (52  part.)   (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    2nd  Solar  Academy:  Training  in  Photovoltaics,  12-­‐23  Aug.,  Nairobi.  (25  part.)     (IPPS  KEN:02)    GC-­‐MS  Instrumentation  Workshop,  3-­‐7  Sept.,  JKUAT,  Nairobi.  (18  part)     (IPICS  KEN:01)    Special  Solar  Academy:  Training  in  Photovoltaics,  21  Oct.-­‐1  Nov.,  Nairobi.  (22  part.)   IPPS  KEN:02)    MSSEESA  Training  workshop  on  interfacing  and  instrumentation,  5-­‐6  Nov.,  Nairobi.  (15  part.)                         (IPPS  MSSEESA)    Training  Workshop  on  Non-­‐Destructing  Testing  (NDT)  Applications,  25  Nov.-­‐6  Dec.,  INST,  UoNBI.  (25  part.)                     (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    1st  Young  Scientist  MSSEESA  Conference  of  Materials  Science  and  Solar  Cell  Technology,  28-­‐29  Nov.,  Nairobi.  (67  part.)                 (IPPS  MSSEESA)    Workshop,  ISO  17025:2005  Quality  Assurance  Training,  28–30  Nov.,  INST,  UoNBI.  (10  part.)                           (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Workshop  on  “Atmospheric  science  –  from  Gothenburg  to  Cairo  and  to  Nairobi  “  and  “Atmospheric  science  and  XRF”,  9  Dec.,  INST,  UoNBI.  (44  part.)             (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Mini-­‐Workshop  “Education  and  Research  in  Botswana:  Opportunities  for  south-­‐south  exchange”,  “Introduction  to  aerosol  Electrospraying:  Fundamentals  and  applications,  and  other  aerosol  aspects  of  charged  particles  “  and  “The  Maldi,  Aerosol  Laser  Time  of  Flight  Mass  Spectrometer:  Development  and  Application”,  10  Dec.,  INST,  UoNBI.  (50  part.)           (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Laos  Theoretical  and  practical  training  course  on  analytical  instruments,  18-­‐30  Mar.,  Dept.  Chemistry,  NUOL.  (15  part)                     (IPICS  LAO:01)    Seminar  on  method  development  of  spiked  recovery  test  on  multi  residue  analyses  of  organochlo-­‐rine  and  organophosphorus  pesticide,  8-­‐9  Apr.,  Dept.  Chem.,  NUOL.  (24  part.)       (IPICS  LAO:01)    Morocco  Meeting  for  ANEC  Launching  during  Second  International  Symposium  on  “Analytical  Chemistry  for  Sustainable  Development”-­‐ACSD  2013  and  the  4th  Federation  of  African  Societies  of  Chemistry  (FASC)  Congress  held  7-­‐9  May,  Ryad  Mogador  Menara,  Marrakech.  (8  part.)       (IPICS  ANEC)    Workshop  on  the  Seismotectonic  Map  of  Africa,  30-­‐31  May,  Agadir,  Marocco.  (30  part.)(IPPS  ETH:02)  Nepal  7th  ANRAP  International  Seminar,  22-­‐24  March,  and  8th  meeting  of  the  General  Assembly  of  ANRAP,  24  Mar.,  Kathmandu.  (400  part.)                 (IPICS  ANRAP)    The  19th  and  20th  meeting  of  ANRAP  Board  ,  24  Mar.,  Kathmandu.  (8  part.)     (IPICS  ANRAP)    Rwanda  Workshop  on  Application  of  Mathematics  in  different  areas,  29-­‐30  Aug.  Kigali.  (20  part.)                         (IPMS  EAUMP)    Active  Volcanism  &  Continental  Rifting  (AVCOR  2013)  International  Workshop,  12-­‐15  Nov.,  Gisenyi.  (300  part.)                     (IPPS  ETH:02)  

 94  

Senegal  Numerical  methods  in  fluid  mechanics,  mathematical  epidemiology  and  reaction-­‐diffusion  systems.  2-­‐13  Sep.,  Ecole  CIMPA-­‐ICTP,  Univ.  Gaston  Berger  de  Saint-­‐Louis.  (60  part.)     (IPMS  BURK:01)    South  Africa  Africa  Array  Workshop,  18-­‐23  Jan.,  Johannesburg.  (>200  part.)       (IPPS  ETH:02)    Sudan  15th  NAPRECA  pre-­‐Sympsium  workshop,  3-­‐5  Dec.,  Khartoum.  (40  part.)     (IPICS  KEN:02)                       (IPICS  NAPRECA)    15th  NAPRECA  Symposium  7-­‐10  Dec.,  Khartoum.  (200  part)           (IPICS  KEN:02)                       (IPICS  NAPRECA)    Tanzania  ANCAP  Tenth  Anniversary  Regional  Symposium  and  Tribute  to  Prof  Michael  Kishimba,  4-­‐7  Jan.,  Univ.  Dar  es  Salaam.  (26  part.)                   (IPICS  ANCAP)    ANCAP  Coordinating  Board  Meeting,  7  Jan.,  Univ.  Dar  es  Salaam.  (8  part.)     (IPICS  ANCAP)    NOMA  Conf.  on  Mathematical  Modeling,  19-­‐20  Dec.,  Univ.  Dar  es  Salaam.  (40  part.)   (IPMS  EAUMP)    Uganda  HEI-­‐ICI  workshop,  2-­‐12  Dec.,  Makerere  University.  (40  part.)         (IPMS  EAUMP)    Zambia  ESARSWG  Bulletin  workshop,  8-­‐12  Apr.,  Lusaka.  (>20  part.)         (IPPS  ESARSWG)    MSSEESA  6th  Board  meeting,  23  Aug.,  Lusaka.  (10  part.)         (IPPS  MSSEESA)    The  10th  ANCAP  summer  school  ”Bioassays,  Bioindicators  and  Biomakers  for  Pesticide  Analysis”,  29  Aug.  -­‐  1  Sept.,  UNZA,  Lusaka.  (16  part.)             (IPICS  ANCAP)  6th  SETAC  Africa  Conference  ”21st  Century  Africa  and  beyond  –  Balancing  economic  growth  opportunities  with  environmental  sustainability”,  2-­‐3  Sept.,  org.  by  SETAC  in  associa-­‐tion  with  Dept.  Chemistry  (UNZA),  Chem.  Soc.  Zambia  and  ANCAP  (60  part.)       (IPICS  ANCAP)                       (IPICS  ZAM:01)    Zimbabwe  Forensic  DNA  Technology,  1-­‐5  Jul.,  Harare.  (5  part.)           (IPICS  AiBST)    Honorary  Lecture  by  Prof  George  Smith,  University  of  Cape  Town,  South  Africa,  Council  Chamber,  9  Sept.,  NUST,  Bulawayo.  Amplitude  Variation  with  Offset  (Avo)  as  an  exploration  and  develop-­‐ment  tool  for  hydrocarbons  (oil  and  gas  exploration).  (37  part.)           (IPPS  ZIM:01)    Annual  Molecular  Diagnostics  and  Forensic  DNA  School,  7-­‐25  Oct.,  Harare.  (10  part.)   (IPICS  AiBST)    ZIM:02  Stakeholders  seminar,  Holiday  Inn  Hotel,  27  May  201.  (40  part)     (IPICS  ZIM:02)        

 95  

6.4.3     Other  communications  and  outreach  activities    Bangladesh  A  meeting  with  farmers  and  government  officials  was  arranged  at  Kaligonj,  Jhinedah  (one  of  the  biggest  vegetable  cultivation  areas  in  Bangladesh)  to  create  awareness  about  the  effects  of  toxic  chemicals  on  human  health  due  to  the  overuse  of  pesticides.  The  farmers  were  very  excited  and  interested  to  learn  about  safe  handling  and  use  of  pesticides,  and  this  will  hopefully  make  them  to  think  about  the  proper  use  of  pesticides.                   (IPICS  BAN:04)    Prof.  K  S  Rabbani.  Start  doing-­‐  Says  Dr.  K  Siddique-­‐e  Rabban.  (online  interview)   (IPPS  BAN:04)    Belgium  Corneille  Bakouan,  Boubié  Guel  and  Anne-­‐Lise  Hantson.  Poster  presented  at  the  annual  scientific  day  organised  by  Ecole  Doctorale  Thématique  en  Génie  des  procédés  EDT-­‐GEPROC  of  Liège  (Belgium)  on  15  November  15.                   (IPICS  BUF:02)    Botswana  A  Women’s  Cooperative  in  northern  Botswana  collects  morula  fruits  and  extract  the  seed  oil  by  mechanical  pressing  for  export  to  South  African  cosmetic  companies.  The  morula  oil  originally  used  to  be  sent  to  Prof.  S.  Yeboah,  Dept.  Chemistry,  University  of  Botrswana,  for  analysis.  Later  Prof.  Yeboah  trained  two  young  women  in  this  group  to  do  the  analysis  themselves.  This  training  given  to  the  young  women  has  been  welcomed  very  much  by  the  community,  as  a  result  of  which  Botswana  Television  made  a  program  in  2013  about  Prof.  Yeboah’s  work  with  the  Women  Cooperative  group.   (IPICS  NABSA)    Burkina  Faso  Contact  was  taken  with  the  village  of  Koala,  40  km  from  Ouagadougou.  The  population  was  informed  about  risks  associated  with  the  use  of  synthetic  pesticides.  Also,  many  contacts  were  made  during  the  national  worshop  on  pesticides  organised  by  the  group  at  Ouagadougou  University,  and  information  acquired  about  the  needs  of  farmers  with  regard  to  biopesticide  formulations.  The  event  was  reported  in  public  media.                   (IPICS  BUF:01)    Projet  de  Recherche  -­‐  Développement,  CONTRIBUTION  A  L'AMELIORATION  DE  L'ACCES  A  UNE  EAU  POTABLE  DE  QUALITE  POUR  LES  POPULATIONS  DE  LA  REGION  NORD  DU  BURKINA  FASO,  Rapport  de  mission  Décembre.                 (IPICS  BUF  :02)    The  network,  through  CRSBAN,  participated  in  the  scientific  exhibition  days  for  the  researchers  and  the  population  of  Ouagadougou  organized  by  Univ.  Ouagadougou  in  October  2013,  and  entered  17  posters  for  competition.  The  Center  got  the  first  price.               (IPICS  RABiotech)    The  Dec.workshop  organized  at  the  Dept.  Physics,  Univ.  Ouagadougou,  was  followed  and  reported  by  a  national  TV  channel  and  two  daily  newspapers.           (IPPS  BUF:01)    Cambodia  A  few  chemistry  staff  members  teach  on  Saturday  and  Sunday  at  six  different  universities  with  branches  in  eight  different  provinces.  Their  students  are  mostly  high  school  teacher  wanting  tertiary  qualification.                     (IPICS  CAB:01)    Group  members  trained  25  high  schoolchemistry  teachers  in  Mundulkiri  on  “Introducing  Experimental  Work  in  Grade  10-­‐12”.                 (IPICS  CAB:01)    In  December,  a  group  of  Physics  lecturers  from  RUPP  organized  a  Science  Workshop  in  Takeo  province  to  train  a  group  of  high  school  teachers  from  Takeo  and  Kampot  provinces.  The  activity  focused  on  providing  the  teachers  with  skills  and  knowledge  in  physics  experiments  and  theory.  The  workshop  received  good  feedback  from  the  participants.             (IPPS  CAM:01)    A  group  from  the  Dept.  Physics  at  RUPP,  Kamerane  Meak,  Tharith  Sriv,  and  Chan  Oeurn  Chey,  and  another  RUPP  staff  member,  Tieng  Siteng,  contributed  as  invited  resource  persons  to  the  national  workshop  on  “Best  Practices  in  Science,  Technology,  Engineering  and  Mathematics  (STEM)  in  Cambodian  Higher  Education  Institutions”,  14-­‐18  October  in  Siem  Reap.  The  activity  was  organized  by  the  General  

 96  

Department  of  Higher  Education,  Ministry  of  Education,  Youth  and  Sports,  and  key  persons  working  on  STEM  or  STEM-­‐related  fields  in  different  universities  in  Cambodia  were  invited  to  attend.                         (IPPS  CAM:01)      Ethiopia  The  Natural  Database  for  Africa  (NDA)  was  originally  designed  by  ALNAP.  It  is  serving  as  a  useful  quick  source  of  information  on  plants.  It  is  continually  updated  and  is  made  available  on  at  www.alnapnetwork.com  and  also  on  CD-­‐ROM.               (IPICS  ALNAP)    Gabon  Mamadou  Abdoul  Diop.  Contrôlabilité  des  équations  intégro-­‐différentielles  stochastiques,  Université  Franceville.                   (IPMS  BURK:01)    Ivory  Cost  Prof.  Jeremie  T.  Zoueu  was  invited  by  the  Ivorian  Society  of  Parasitologists  to  give  a  presentation  on  instrumentation  applied  to  malaria  studies.             (IPPS  AFSIN)    Kenya  Collaboration  with  the  University  of  Illinois,  USA,  has  resulted  in  holding  conferences  in  Nairobi  and  Arusha.                     (IPICS  KEN:01)    Lydia  Njenga,  Chairperson  of  the  College  of  Biological  and  Physical  Sciences  gave  an  address  at  the  Rapid  Result  Initiative  (RRI),  for  the  implementation  of  the  Kenya  constitution  2010  within  100  days.                         (IPICS  KEN:01)    

 Radio  America  took  documentary  photos  of  the  research  instrumentation  and  interviewed  the  INST  director  and  some  of  the  current  and  previous  students  on  the  activities  and  achievements  of  the  institute.                     (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    International  Finance  Cooperation,  communication  department,  took  a  documentary  of  the  renewable  energy  activities  at  INST  and  interviewed  the  technical  staff  and  faculty.       (IPPS  KEN:01/2)      Dr.  S.  Waita  was  motivational  speaker  at  the  Annual  Kithumani  Academic  Forum  on  28  December,  targeting  the  youth  (primary  to  University).  The  initiative  has  impacted  considerably  in  the  area  since  inception  4  years  ago.  Those  who  have  been  attending  have  started  two  more  such  forums  and  the  influence  is  spreading.                 (IPPS  KEN:02)    Laos  Dr.  Kesiny  Phomkeona  gave  a  presentation  on  “Spiked  recovery  test  on  multi  residue  analyses  of  organochlorine  and  organophosphorus  pesticides”  at  the  Scientific  exhibition  held  by  Faculty  of  Science,  NUOL,  at  the  University  convention  hall  on  20  December.         (IPICS  LAO:01)    Spain  Mamadou  Abdoul  Diop.  Équations  intégro-­‐différentielles  stochastiques  de  type  impulsives,  Université  de  Séville.                     (IPMS  BURK:01)    Sweden  Visiting  PhD  students  Ms.  Sanata  Traore  and  Mr.  Souleymane  Dambe  presented  their  work,  “Zinc  content  in  soils  and  vegetable  culture  and  their  products  in  the  city  and  surrounding  Bamako”  and  “Phosphorus  availability  in  paddy  soils  in  Mali:  Qualitative  and  quantitative  influence  of  clay  materials”,  respectively,  at  a  ISP-­‐SLU  seminar  on“Zinc  and  Phosphorus  availability  in  soils  in  Mali”  at  the  Dept.  Soil  Environ.,  SLU,  Uppsala,  3  May.                   (IPICS  MAL:01)      Dr.  Michael  J.  Gatari  was  invited  to  Uppsala  University  for  two  days  and  gave  a  seminar  about  the  Institute  of  Nuclear  Science  &  Technology  at  Univ.  Nairobi,  “North-­‐South  Assistance  and  Collaboration”,  at  Department  of  Applied  Nuclear  Physics,  19  September.         (IPPS  KEN:02)        

 97  

Tanzania  Mohammad  Shoeb,  Food  Safety  and  Challanges  for  Developing  Country.  Presentation  16  November  at  University  of  Dar  es  Salaam.               (IPICS  BAN:04)    Uganda  The  members  of  the  Astrophysics  and  Space  Science  Research  Group  (Dept.  Physics,  Mbarara  Univ.  Sci.  Technol.)  were  involved  in  the  national  event  for  the  solar  eclipse  on  3  November  2013.  They  got  solar  shades  from  Astronomers  without  Borders  and  took  a  center  stage  in  disseminating  information  about  the  eclipse.  This  activity  made  the  group  interact  with  government,  the  local  community,  tourists,  and  the  media.  Their  involvement  was  on  their  own  initiative  and  had  far-­‐reaching  impact  in  dissemination  of  the  dangers  of  ultraviolet  radiation  to  the  eyes.  As  a  consequence,  many  participants  abandoned  their  improvised  solar  viewers  (made  from  exposed  X-­‐ray  films).         (IPPS  UGA:02)  

 Zimbabwe  The  Herald  reported  18  Dec.  on  the  contribution  of  AiBST  in  identifying  victims  in  a  traffic  accident.  http://www.herald.co.zw/chisumbanje-­‐ethanol-­‐tanker-­‐explosion-­‐victims-­‐identified/   (IPICS  AiBST)    The  group  was  invited  for  two  separate  half-­‐hour  radio  discussions  on  Genomic  Medicine  by  Star  FM,  one  of  the  radio  stations  in  Zimbabwe.  These  discussion  included  phone-­‐ins  by  the  public  which  made  for  very  interactive  discussions.                 (IPICS  AiBST)    The  group  was  invited  for  a  one-­‐hour  radio  discussion  on  DNA  applications  in  Medicine  and  Forensic  Investigations  by  ZiFM  Stereo,  another  radio  station  in  Zimbabwe.  This  again  included  interactive  discussion  with  the  public  who  phoned  in.             (IPICS  AiBST)    DNA  technology  training  was  given  to  University  of  Bindura  students.       (IPICS  AiBST)    AiBST  conducted  4  Next  Generation  Biomedical  Scientists  program  lectures  with  High  Schools.  The  schools  that  have  benefited  from  this  so  far  are:  1.  St  Dominics  Chishawasha,  2.  Prince  Edward  School,  3.  St  Ignatius  School,  and  4.  Dominican  Convent  School.  This  has  proved  extremely  popular  with  the  high  schools  and  it  will  hopefully  change  career  options  where  more  students  will  choose  life  sciences.                         (IPICS  AiBST)    Two  visits  and  lab  tours  by  high  school  children  to  AiBST  were  arranged.  The  beneficiaries  were    1.  Dominican  Convent  and  2.  Bindura  School.                       (IPICS  AiBST)    AiBST  presented  at  the  Annual  Ministry  of  Science  and  Technology  Development  exhibition.  During  this  5-­‐day  event,  AiBST  show  cased  its  activities  in  1.  Postgraduate  education,  2.  Bioanalytical  applications  in  medicine  and  3.  The  DNA  testing  services.             (IPICS  AiBST)    AiBST  have  weekly  laboratory  meetings  and  post-­‐conference/workshop  reports  by  AiBST  scientists  where  the  students  and  researcher  present  their  work  and  are  critiqued,  thus  help  them  remain  focused  and  interpret  their  results  the  best  way  possible.             (IPICS  AiBST)    A  one-­‐hour  presentation,  Effect  of  everyday  chemical  use  on  human  health,  was  given  to  20  persons,  mostly  medical  doctors/general  physicians,  upon  invitation  by  the  Zimbabwe  Medical  Association,  Bulawayo  Branch.                       (IPICS  ZIM:02)                  6.4.4   Use  of  results    Bangladesh   (Human  resources)  As  soon  as  the  local  manufacturers  have  started  to  produce  scientific  hardware,  the  locally  trained  manpower  with  their  expertise  will  be  absorbed  in  these  industries.  Personal  contacts  have  been  made  to  several  institutes  and  local  business  people  to  try  and  make  use  of  the  fresh  graduates  who  have  performed  their  scientific  research  in  the  group.  People  trained  in  this  group  are  finding  positions  in  different  public  and  private  universities  and  at  national  level  research  organizations.  AECD  is  also  involved  to  provide  commercial  service  to  local  industries.           (IPPS  BAN:02)        

 98  

  (Medical  technology)  Prof.  Rabbani  has  convinced  a  private  corporate  body  to  donate  a  unit  of  the  Computerised  Dynamic  Pedograph  (CDP)  to  BIRDEM,  a  premier  hospital  for  diabetic  diseases  care  and  research  in  Dhaka.  Prof.  Rabbani’s  team  has  assembled  and  installed  the  unit  in  early  2013.  The  CDP  is  a  device  to  measure  the  dynamic  pressure  distribution  under  the  feet  while  walking,  developed  and  constructed  under  the  leadership  of  Prof.  Rabbani.                 (IPPS  BAN:04)    Eritrea   (Mining)  A  mining  company  is  finalizing  feasibility  studies  for  potash  mining  in  the  Eritrean  side  of  the  Afar  Depression.  Members  of  ESARSWG  have  performed  preliminary  seismic  hazard  assessment  for  the  area.  The  report,  authored  by  Ghebrebrhan  Ogubazghi,  Berhe  Goitom,  and  Mebrahtu  Fesseha,  and  titled  Seismic  hazard  for  South  Boulder  mining  concession  around  Colluli:  a  preliminary  assessment  (25  pp),  was  submitted  on  5  November  2013.             (IPPS  ESARSWG)    Ethiopia   (Laboratory  service)  ALNAP  assists  local  laboratories  with  micropropagation  of  Medicinal  and  Aromatic  Plants.                         (IPICS  ALNAP)         (Construction  engineering)  The  seismology  group  is  collaborating  with  the  Ministry  of  Urban  Development  and  Construction  to  up-­‐date  the  building  code  and  standard  of  the  country.  The  research  results  in  seismicity  are  one  of  the  pill-­‐ars  of  the  code.  This  has  immense  implication  to  the  construction  industry.     (IPPS  ETH:02)    Kenya   (Health  care  and  Insurance  business)  The  published  research  results  have  been  used  in  practice,  influencing  policy,  and  applied  in  teaching  in  the  following  areas:                   (IPMS  EAUMP)  • Fighting  spread  of  malaria  in  Kenya  and  the  East  African  region.  • Vaccination  of  livestock  and  small  animals.  • Claims  reserving  in  insurance  business.  • Research  projects  for  PhD  and  MSc  students.         (Applied  physics)  The  research  of  the  Condensed  Matter  group  at  the  Dept.  Pysics,  Univ.  Nairobi  has  focused  on  photovolta-­‐ics  (materials  and  systems),  ceramics  for  thermophysical  (thermal  insulation  of  cooking  elements)  and  water  purification  applications.  Whereas  the  activities  have  concerned  more  the  basic  science  aspects,  improved  interaction  with  industry  can  see  these  results  converted  into  products  that  have  impact  on  efficient  energy  usage  (leading  to  environmental  sustainability),  and  clean  water  (health  improvement).  The  low  uptake  of  research  results  is  attributed  to  the  fact  that  the  local  industries  are  mostly  branches  of  multinational  companies  and  are  therefore  mainly  service  oriented.  Further,  there  are  few  venture  capitalists  who  incubate  research  results  into  market  products.  Presently  the  Univ.  Nairobi  has  started  a  way  of  nurturing/incubating  research  results  (through  the  Science  Park)  and  the  Intellectual  Properties  Right  Policy  that  in  the  long  run  will  help  alleviate  the  hitherto  weak  area  where  researchers  rushed  to  publish  their  results  regardless  the  potential  commercial  value.       (IPPS  KEN:02)    Zambia     (Solar  energy)  The  group  at  Dept.  Physics,  Univ.  Zambia,  has  been  involved  in  installations  of  solar  home  systems  in  rural  areas.  Two  technicians  from  the  group,  Mr  Bellingtone  Changwe  and  Mr  Francis  Musonda  were  involved  in  electrification  of  rural  areas  in  Luapula  Province  using  solar  panels  (Solar  Home  Systems)  in  August.                       (IPPS  ZAM:01)    Zimbabwe   (Plant  products)  Results  regarding  antibacterial  and  antifungal  effects  of  natural  products  from  plants  are  used  by  formul-­‐ating  solutions  that  can  be  tested  in-­‐house  as  antiseptics  or  disinfectants,  aiming  at  future  industrial  applications.                       (IPICS  ZIM:01)    The  Ministry  of  Health  and  Child  Care  and  the  Ministry  of  Home  Affairs  were  able  to  address  a  national  disaster  through  DNA  profiling  services  provided  by  AIBST  in  the  identification  of  traffic  accident  victims.                     (IPICS  AiBST)      

 99  

6.4.5   Other  interesting  results  and  activities    Bangladesh   (Instrument  repair)  In  2013,  NITUB  repaired  102  non-­‐functioning  pieces  of  scientific  equipment  of  different  institutions  in  Bangladesh.  The  book  value  of  the  repaired  instruments  is  nominally  about  595,000  USD,  and  NITUB  spent  approximately  1,100  USD  on  the  repairs.             (IPICS  NITUB)    Ethiopia     (Outreach  to  society)  The  Department  of  Mathematics  at  Addis  Ababa  University  has  presented  its  activities  to  the  society  in  an  open-­‐day  organized  by  Addis  Ababa  University  in  June.         (IPMS  ETH:01)    The  Dept.  Mathematics  at  Addis  Ababa  University,  in  collaboration  with  the  College  of  Computational  and  Natural  Sciences,  has  organized  a  five  week  training  (July-­‐August)  in  Mathematics  for  elementary  and  highschool  students  from  different  parts  of  the  country.         (IPMS  ETH:01)    Dr.  Semu  Mitiku  is  an  organizer  and  presentor  of  a  weekly  program  called  ”Hello  Science”  on  National  Television,  that  is  promoting  Mathematics  and  science.         (IPMS  ETH:01)    Kenya   (Rural  illumination)  The  roup  at  INST  has  been  approached  by  UNEP  to  prepare  assessment  of  the  impact  of  a  Lantern  project.  Five  hundred  LED  lanterns  will  be  given  to  a  village  women  organization  in  a  selected  rural  area  as  a  replacement  for  paraffin  based  lighting.  Will  indoor  air  quality  improve?  Will  the  families  save  money  by  the  changed  lighting  system?                 (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    The  International  Finance  Corporation  promised  to  renew  the  support  of  the  Lighting  Global  laboratory  program  into  2014.                 (IPPS  KEN:01/2)       (New  collaboration)  Stockholm  University  invited  INST  to  participate  in  a  cooperation  project  on  studying  atmospheric  particulate  carbon  in  Kenya.               (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    The  group  at  INST  entered  a  research  cooperation  agreement  with  University  of  Brescia,  Chemistry  for  Technologies  Laboratory,  Italy.               (IPPS  KEN:01/2)       (Positive  effects  of  scientific  exchange)  Scientific  exchange  has  strengthened  and  motivated  research  activities  and  students.  It  has  helped  improve  in  journal  article  publishing  and  conference  contributions  thus  motivating  staff  and  students.  Students  feel  encouraged  as  they  enter  into  international  networks  and  association  through  their  research  participation  in  the  north.  More  funding  support  results.         (IPPS  KEN:01/2)    Tanzania     (Outreach  to  society)  The  Dept.  Math.  at  UDSM  is  a  patron  of  the  Mathematical  Association  of  Tanzania  (MAT/CHAHITA).  Staff  members  from  the  department  participate  in  monthly  meetings  organized  by  the  association  for  im-­‐provement  of  learning  and  teaching  of  mathematics  at  primary  and  secondary  schools.  They  also  participated  in  Pi  day  cerebration  as  well  as  at  National  of  Mathematics  seminars.     (IPMS  EAUMP)        Uganda   (Outreach  to  society)  The  Dept  Mathematics  at  Makerere  Univ.  carries  out  outreach  activities  via  Uganda  Mathematical  Society.  Activities  include  the  annual  National  Mathematics  Contest  for  Primary  schools,  Secondary  schools,  NTCs  and  PTCs,  and  Universities,  participation  in  PAMO,  Annual  National  teachers’  conference,  and  public  lectures.   (IPMS  EAUMP)  

   

 100  

SECTION  7:  ABREVIATIONS  AND  ACRONYMS  AAS   African  Academy  of  Sciences  AAS   Atomic  Absorption  Spectrometry  AAU   Addis  Ababa  University  (Addis  Ababa,  Ethiopia)  ABOLT   Al  Baha  Optimizing  Teaching  and  Learning  ABU   Al  Baha  University,  Al  Baha,  Saudi  Arabia  AECD   Atomic  Energy  Centre  Dhaka  (Dhaka,  Bangladesh)  AETFAT   Association  pour  l'Etude  Taxonomique  de  la  Flore  d'Afrique  Tropicale  AFSIN   African  Spectral  Imaging  Network  AiBST   African  Institute  of  Biomedical  Science  and  Technology  ALNAP   African  Laboratory  for  Natural  Products  ANCAP   African  Network  for  the  Chemical  Analysis  of  Pesticides  ANFEC   Asian  Network  of  Research  on  Food  and  Environment  Contaminants  ANRAP   Asian  Network  of  Research  on  Antidiabetic  Plants  ASEAN   Association  of  Southeast  Asian  Nations  BAN   Bangladesh  BAU   Bangladesh  Agricultural  University  Bil.Prg. Bilateral Program BMBSZ Biochemistry  and  Molecular  Biology  Society  of  Zimbabwe  BMC BioMed Central  BIRDEM   Bangladesh  Institute  of  Research  and  Rehabilitation  in  Diabetes,  Endocrine  and  

Metabolic  Disorders  (Dhaka,  Bangladesh)  BCF   Balance  Carried  Forward  BCSIR   Bangladesh  Council  of  Scientific  and  Industrial  Research  BSTI   Bangladesh  Standards  and  Testing  Institute    BUET   Bangladesh  University  of  Engineering  and  Technology  BUF   Burkina  Faso  BUHS   Bangladesh  University  of  Health  Sciences,  Dhaka,  Bangladesh  BURK   Burkina  Faso  CAB   Cambodia  CAM   Cambodia  CAMES   African  Council  for  Tertiary  Education  CCS   Cambodian  Chemical  Society  CDC   Commission  for  Developing  Countries  CDP   Computerised  Dynamic  Pedograph  CEPHYR   Centre  for  Phytotherapy  and  Research  CEREA   Centre  d’Enseignement  et  de  Recherches  en  Environnement  Atmospherique  CIMO   Centre  for  International  Mobility  CIMPA   Centre  International  de  Mathématiques  Pures  et  Appliquées  CPT   Clinical  Pharmacology  &  Therapeutics  CRSBAN   Centre  de  Recherche  en  Sciences  Biologiques,  Alimentaires  et  Nutritionnelles  

(University  of  Ouagadougou,  Burkina  Faso)  CRM   Centre  de  Recerca  Matemàtica,  Barcelona,  Spain  CSUCA   Consejo  Superior  de  Universidades  Centroamericanas  CYP   Cytochrome  P450  DC   Direct  Current  DDT   Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane  (banned  insecticide)  Dept.   Department  DICTS   Directorate  of  ICT  Support  (Makerere  University,  Kampala,  Uganda)  DOAS   Dedicated  Outdoor  Air  Systems    DOI   Digital  Object  Identifier  DSSC   Dye-­‐Sensitized  Solar  Cell  EASAC   European  Academies  of  Science  Advisory  Council  EAUMP   Eastern  African  Universities  Mathematics  Programme  ECD   Electron  Capture  Detector  EDP   Electrophoretic  Deposition    EMS   European  Mathemathical  Society  

 101  

ESARSWG   Eastern  and  Southern  Africa  Regional  Seismological  Working  Group  ETH   Ethiopia  EPS   European  Physical  Society  ETA   Extremely  Thin  Absorber  F   Female  FC   (Swedish)  Focus  Country  Fondrid   Fonds  National  pour  la  Recherche,  l’Innovation  et  le  Développement,  (BUF)  FS   Författningssamling  (Swedish  Government  Statute-­‐book)  GC   Gas  Chromatograph  GEM   Global  Earthquake  Model  GERD   Great  Ethiopian  Renaissance  Dam  GFH   Granular  Ferric  Hydroxide  HEI-­‐ICI   Higher  Education  Institutions  Institutional  Cooperation  Instrument  HIV   Human  immunodeficiency  virus  HPLC   High  Performance  Liquid  Chromatography  IAEA   International  Atomic  Energy  Agency  IAP   The  Global  Network  for  Science  Academies  ICCA   International  Chemistry  Conference  in  Africa  ICRAF   World  Agroforestry  Centre  ICTP   The  Abdus  Salam  International  Centre  for  Theoretical  Physics  ID   Identity  IEEE   Institute  of  Electrical  and  Electronics  Engineers  IF   Impact  Factor  INST   Institute  of  Nuclear  Science  and  Technology  (Univ.  Nairobi,  Nairobi,  Kenya)  IPICS   International  Programme  in  the  Chemical  Sciences  (ISP)    IPMS   International  Programme  in  the  Mathematical  Sciences  (ISP)  IPPS   International  Programme  in  the  Physical  Sciences  (ISP)  ISEE   International  Society  for  Environmental  Epidemiology  ISES   International  Society  of  Exposure  Science  ISIAQ   International  Society  for  Indoor  Air  Quality  and  Climate  ISP   International  Science  Programme  (Uppsala  University,  Sweden)  ISRN   International  Scholarly  Research  Notices  IWA   International  Water  Association    J.   Journal  JKUAT   Jomo  Kenyatta  University  of  Agriculture  and  Technology,  Nairobi,  Kenya  KEN   Kenya    KIST   Kigali  Institute  of  Science  and  Technology,  Kigali,  Rwanda  (see  UR)  kSEK   Thousands  of  Swedish  Crowns  (currency  unit)  KTH   Kungliga  Tekniska  Högskolan  (Royal  Institute  of  Technology),  Stockholm,  Sweden  KVA   Kungliga  vetenskapsakademien  (Royal  Swedish  Academy  of  Sciences)  L.Am.   Latin  America  LAM   African  Laser,  Atomic,  Molecular  and  Optical  Sciences  Network  LANBIO   Latin  American  Network  for  Research  in  Bioactive  Natural  Compounds  LAO   Laos  LaTiCE   Learning  and  Teaching  in  Computing  and  Engineering  LBIC   Light  Beam  Induced  Current  LBIV   Light  Beam  Induced  Voltage  LED   Light  Emitting  Diode  LiU   Linköping  University,  Linköping,  Sweden  LMPD   Laboratoire  de  Mathematiques  et  Dynamique  de  Populations,  Marrakech,  Morocco  LTU   Luleå  Tekniska  Universitet  (Lulea  University  of  Technology),  Luleå,  Sweden  M   Male  MAL   Mali  MAO   Monoammonium  oxygenase  MARM   Mentoring  African  Research  in  Mathematics  MFS   Minor  Field  Study  Md   Muhammad/Muhammed  MDA   Mass  Drag  Administration  MIR   Mid-­‐Infrared  Spectroscopy  

 102  

MPhil   Master  of  Philosophy    MRI   Magnetic  Resonance  Imaging  MS   Mass  Spectrometer  /  Mass  Spectrometry  MSSEESA   Materials  Science  and  Solar  Energy  Network  for  Eastern  and  Southern  Africa  MUST   Mbarara  University  of  Science  and  Technology,  Mbarara,  Uganda  N/A   Not  Applicable  (or  Not  Available)  NABSA   Network  for  Analytical  and  Bioassay  Services  in  Africa  NADMICA   Nature  Induced  Disaster  Mitigation  in  Central  America    NAPRECA   Natural  Products  Research  Network  for  Eastern  and  Central  Africa  NDA   Natural  Database  for  Africa  NDT   Non-­‐Destructive  Test  NEPAD   New  Partnership  for  Africa's  Development  NITUB   Network  of  Instrument  Technical  Personnel  and  User  Scientists  of  Bangladesh  NGO   Non  Government  Organisation  NMC   National  Mathematical  Centre,  Abuja,  Nigeria  NOMA   Norad’s  Programme  for  Master  Studies  Norad   Norwegian  Agency  for  Development  Cooperation  NTCs   National  Teacher  Colleges  NTO   Nb-­‐doped  TiO2  NUOL   National  University  of  Laos  (Vientiane,  Laos)  NUR   National  University  of  Rwanda  (see  UR)  NUST   National  University  of  Science  and  Technology,  Bulawayo,  Zimbabwe  NUSTAWA   NUST  Academic  Women’s  Association  NW   Scientific  Network  P3HT   Poly(3-­‐hexylthiophene)    PACM   Pan  African  Centre  for  Mathemathics  PACN   Pan  Africa  Chemistry  Network  PAH   Polyaromatic  hydrocarbon  PAMO   Pan  African  Math  Olympiad  PCA   Principal  Component  Analysis  (statistical  method)  PCBMC   Phenyl-­‐C61-­‐butyric  acid  methyl  ester    PDA   Photodiode  Array  Detector  PDE   Partial  Differential  Equations  PhD   Doctor  of  Philosophy    Phys.   Physical  Phys.   Physical  PLSR   Partial  least  squares  regression  PTCs   Primary  Teacher  Colleges  Publ.     Publication(s)  PV   Photovoltaic  PZQ   Praziquantel  (medical  drug)  RABiotech   West  African  Biotechnology  Network  RAFPE   Research  network  in  Africa  on  Pollution  of  the  Environment  ReSBOA   Réseau  Substances  Bioactives  Ouest  Africain  RBM   Results  Based  Management  RG   Research  Group  RIS   Reservoir  Induced  Seismicity  RUPP   Royal  University  of  Phnom  Penh  (Phnom  Penh,  Cambodia)  RWA   Rwanda  SADC   Southern  Africa  Development  Countries  SAMS   South  African  Mathematical  Society  SAMSA   Southern  African  Mathematical  Sciences  Association  Sandw.   Sandwich  (training  program)  SANORD   Southern  African-­‐Nordic  Center  SE   Sweden  SEANAC   Southern  and  Eastern  Africa  Network  for  Analytical  Chemists  SEK   Swedish  Crowns  (currency  unit)  SETAC   Society  of  Environmental  Toxicology  and  Chemistry  SFS   Svensk  Författningssamling  (Swedish  Government  Statute-­‐book)  

 103  

SGWI   Safe  Global  Water  Institute  SIAM   Society  for  Industrial  and  Applied  Mathematics  Sida   Swedish  International  Development  Cooperation  Agency  SIK   Institutet  för  Livsmedel  och  Bioteknik  AB  (Swedish  Institute  for  Food  and  

Biotechnology),  Gothenburg,  Sweden  SKA   Square  Kilometer  Array  SLU   Sveriges  Lantbruksuniversitet  (Swedish  University  of  Agricultural  Sciences)  SOACHIM     Société  ouest-­‐  africaine  de  chimie  Sonabel   Société  Nationale  Burkinabè  d’Electricité  SONU   Students  Organization  of  Nairobi  University,  Nairobi,  Kenya  SMI   Smittskyddsinstitutet  (Swedish  Institute  for  Communicable  Disease  Control)  SSEESS   Swedish  Secretariat  for  Environmental  Earth  System  Sciences  STEM   Science,  Technology,  Engineering  and  Mathematics  SU   Stockholm  University,  Stockholm,  Sweden  TAN   Tanzania  TDR   Special  Programme  for  Research  and  Training  in  Tropical  Diseases  TICA   Thailand  International  Development  Cooperation  Agency  TR   Thomson  Reuters  (see  http://thomsonreuters.com/journal-citation-reports/)  TRF   Thailand  Research  Fund  TWAS   The  World  Academy  of  Sciences    TRXF   Total-­‐Reflection  X-­‐ray  Fluorescence  UDSM   University  of  Dar  es  Salaam  (Dar  es  Salaam,  Tanzania)  UEM   Universidad  Eduardo  Mondlane  (Maputo,  Mozambique)  UGA   Uganda  UHÄ   Universitets-­‐  och  högskoleämbetet  (Office  of  Universities  and  Higher  Education,  

Sweden)  UN   United  Nations  UNEP   United  Nations  Environmental  Program  UNESCO   United  Nations  Educational,  Scientific  and  Cultural  Organization  Univ.   University  UoNBI   University  of  Nairobi,  Nairobi,  Kenya  UR   University  of  Rwanda  UR/Huye   University  of  Rwanda,  Huye  Campus  (former  NUR)  UR/Kig   University  of  Rwanda,  Kigali  Campus  (former  KIST)  USA   United  States  of  America  UU   Uppsala  University,  Uppsala,  Sweden  w/o   without  WHO   World  Health  Organisation  XRD   X-­‐Ray  Diffraction  XRF   X-­‐Ray  Fluorescence  ZAM   Zambia    ZIM   Zimbabwe      

 104  

 Ms  Newayemedhin  Aberra  Tegegne,  PhD  student  at  IPPS  ETH:01,  Department  of  Physics,  Addis  Ababa  University,  Ethiopia,  explaining  her  work  on  characterization  of  semiconductors  organic  polymers.  (Courtesy  of  ISP)    

 

Biochemistry  students  attached  to  IPICS  ZIM:01,  University  of  Harare,  Zimbabwe,  attending  an  internal  seminar  reviewing  the  progress  of  the  research.  (Courtesy  of  ISP)    

 105  

APPENDIX  1:  LOGICAL  FRAMEWORK  OF  THE  INTERNATIONAL  SCIENCE  PROGRAMME  

 According  to  ISP’s  Strategic  Plan  2013-­‐2017:  

ISP  contributes  to  the  creation  of  new  knowledge  to  address  development  challenges.  

The  ISP  vision  is  to  efficiently  contribute  to  a  significant  growth  of  scientific  knowledge  in  low-­‐income  countries,  thereby  promoting  social  and  economic  wealth  in  those  countries,  and,  by  developing  human  resources,  in  the  world  as  a  whole.    

In  support  of  this  vision,  the  overall  goal  of  ISP  is  to  contribute  to  the  strengthening  of  scientific  research  and  postgraduate  education  within  the  basic  sciences,  and  to  promote  its  use  to  address  development  challenges.    

ISP  therefore  has  the  general  objective  to  strengthen  the  domestic  capacity  for  scientific  research  and  postgraduate  education,  by  long-­‐term  support  to  research  groups  and  scientific  networks  in  these  fields.  

The  expected  outcome  for  low-­‐income  countries  is  more-­‐well-­‐qualified  postgraduates,  and  the  increased  production  and  use  of  high  quality  scientific  research  results,  relevant  to  the  fight  against  poverty.  Development  of  science  also  promotes  critical  thinking  based  on  scientific  evidence,  necessary  for  democracy  development.  

The  expected  outcome  for  collaborating  partners  is  an  expanded  global  perspective,  an  enhanced  awareness  and  knowledge  of  the  potentials,  conditions,  and  relevant  issues  of  research  collaboration  with  low-­‐income  countries,  and  an  increased  collaboration  with  scientists  in  those  countries.  

To  achieve  its  general  objective,  ISP  defines  three  specific  objectives:    1) Better  planning  of,  and  improved  conditions  for  carrying  out,  scientific  research  and  postgraduate  training.  

2) Increased  production  of  high  quality  research  results.  3) Increased  use  by  society  of  research  results  and  of  graduates  in  development.  

These  objectives  constitute  the  basis  for  ISP’s  logical  framework  in  the  results  based  management  (RBM)  system  introduced  in  2013.  The  program  logic  published  in  ISP’s  Strategy  Plan  2013-­‐2017  was  refined  in  November  2013.  The  corresponding  monitoring  and  evaluation  system  is  under  development.  

 106  

Specific  objective  1:  Better  planning  of,  and  improved  conditions  for  carrying  out,  scientific  research  and  postgraduate  training.  

Types  of  Output    Outcom

e      Perform

ance  Indicator    Data  Source  

Data  Collection  Strategy    

Assumptions    

Specific  Objective  1:  Better  planning  of,  and  im

proved  conditions  for  carrying  out,  scientific  research  and  postgraduate  training.  ISP  invitation  for  application,  w

ith  forms  

and  guidelines.  

a)  Sufficient  applications  are  subm

itted  to  ISP.  Num

ber  of  applications  received  in  relation  to  invitations.  

Record  of  invitations  sent  and  applications  received.  

Yearly  under  ISP  adm

inistrative  routines.  Support  is  needed.  Basic  m

anage-­‐ment  capacity  is  at  hand.  Applica-­‐

tion  procedure  is  understood.  ISP  evaluation  of  subm

itted  applications   b)  Applications  are  favorably  evaluated  and  grants  aw

arded  Num

ber  of  applications  granted  in  relation  to  subm

issions  Record  of  applications  received  and  granted.  

Yearly  under  ISP  adm

inistrative  routines.  Received  applications  m

eet  ISP  standards  and  criteria.  

ISP  providing  training  and  m

entoring.  c)  M

aintained  or  increased  quality  of  applications  subm

itted  to  ISP.  ISP  scientific  reference  group  rating  of  received  applications.  

Assessment  by  ISP  scien-­‐

tific  reference  groups.  Yearly  under  ISP  adm

inistrative  routines.  Quality  of  application  effects  rating  by  ISP  scientific  reference  group.  

ISP  providing  training  and  m

entoring.  d)  Aw

arded  grants  are  used  as  planned.  

Expenditures  in  relation  to  final  yearly  budget.  

Annual  financial  reporting.  

Yearly  under  ISP  adm

inistrative  routines.  Approved  budgets  are  realistic  under  conditions  at  hand.  

ISP  providing  training  and  m

entoring.  e)  M

aintained  or  increased  level  of  funding  for  research  from

 other  sources  than  ISP.  

Yearly  amount  of  funding  

granted  from  other  sources  than  

ISP.  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Other  research  funding  is  available.  Scientific  excellence  developed.  Quality  proposals  are  subm

itted.  ISP  providing  training  and  m

entoring.  f)  Sufficient  funding  to  continue  activities  w

ithout  ISP  support.  Num

ber  of  activities  phased  out  of  support  yearly  because  sus-­‐tainability  has  been  achieved.  

ISP  Board  minutes  

Yearly  review  of  ISP  

Board  minutes  

Sufficient  funding  from  other  

sources.  Scientific  excellence  developed.    

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  g)  Staff  gender  balance  >40%

 of  minority  gender.  

Gender  proportion  of  staff.  Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Awareness  of  gender  issue  and  

availability  of  candidates.  Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  h)  PG  students’  gender  balance  >40%

 of  minority  gender.  

Gender  proportion  of  PG  stud-­‐ents  and  PhD

 graduates  Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Awareness  of  gender  issues  and  

availability  of  candidates  Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  i)  Adm

itted  PhD  students  continue  

to  graduation.  Num

ber  of  admitted  students  

remaining  or  graduating/year.  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   PhD  study  has  adequate  

supervision,  time  and  resources.  

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  j)  PhD

 students  graduate  within  the  

expected  time  fram

e.  Duration  of  study  of  graduating  

PhDs  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   PhD  study  has  adequate  

supervision,  time  and  resources.  

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  k)  D

evelopment  of  scientific  

collaboration  with  other  groups.  

Num

ber  of  external  scientific  collaborators  per  activity.  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Willingness  to  collaborate.  

Prospective  collaborators  available.    Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  l)  M

aintained  or  improved  

conditions  with  regard  to  technical  

resources.  

Num

ber  of  functional  and  relevant  technical  resource  item

s  available.  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Knowledge  of  requirem

ents  for  acquisition  and  m

aintenance  of  technical  resources.    

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  m)  Negative  environm

ental  impact  

of  activities  is  low.  

Measures  recom

mended  by  ISP  

to  reduce  environmental  im

pact  that  have  been  im

plemented.  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Awareness  of  risks  to  environm

ent  of  activities.  

   

 107  

Specific  objective  2:  Increased  production  of  high  quality  research  results.  

Types  of  Output    Outcom

e    Perform

ance  Indicator  Data  Source  

Data  Collection  Strategy    

Assumptions    

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  n)  M

aintained  or  increased  number  

of  quality  publications.    Total  num

ber  of  yearly  scientific  publications,  and  proportion  in  indexed  journals.  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Conditions  allow  for  research.  

Results  are  written  up  and  

submitted  to  journals.  

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  o)  M

aintained  or  increased  number  

of  quality  contributions  to  scientific  conferences.  

Total  number  of  yearly  contrib-­‐

utions,  and  proportion  international.  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Conditions  allow  for  research.  

Results  are  written  up  and  

submitted  to  conferences.  

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  p)  M

aintained  or  increased  number  

of  Master’s  graduations.  

Num

ber  of  yearly  Master’s  

graduations.  Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   PG  students  have  adequate  supervision,  tim

e  and  resources.  Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  q)  M

aintained  or  increased  number  

of  Doctoral  graduations.  

Num

ber  of  yearly  Doctoral  

graduations.  Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   PG  students  have  adequate  supervision,  tim

e  and  resources.  Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  r)  PhD

 students  have  published  results  before  thesis  defense.  

Num

ber  of  publications  last  5  years  by  yearly  graduated  PhD

s.   Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Results  are  written  up  and  

submitted  to  journals.  

 Specific  objective  3:  Increased  use  of  research  results  and  graduates.  

Types  of  Outputs    Outcom

es      Perform

ance  Indicators    Data  Source  

Data  Collection  Strategy    

Assumptions    

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  s)  Increased  outreach  to  society.    

Num

ber  and  nature  of  outreach  activities.  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Outreach  activities  are  seen  as  important  by  supported  units  and  

mechanism

s  for  outreach  are  identified  and  used.  

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  t)  Increased  recognition  of  research  results.  

Num

ber  and  nature  of  honors  (aw

ards,  appointments  w

ith  com

mittees,  etc.)  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Outreach  activities  generate  interest  w

ith  stakeholders.  

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  u)  Increased  use  of  research  results.  N

umber  and  nature  of  instances  

of  use  (in  practice,  in  policy  change,  in  patents,  etc.)  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   Results  are  useful  in  various  contexts.    

Funding,  coordination,  and  m

entoring  by  ISP.  v)  Graduates  and  staff  stay  or  get  positions  w

here  they  can  contribute  to  developm

ent.  

Num

ber  of  staff  and  students  maintained  or  leaving  for  

relevant  positions.  

Annual  activity  reporting  to  ISP.  

Yearly  compilation  of  

activity  reporting  by  ISP.   PG  training  results  in  competitive  

human  resources.