March 18, 2014 CHH

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March 18, 2014 CHH

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  • TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 2014 WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY WKUHERALD.COM VOLUME 89 NO. 40

    LGBTSURVEY ATTEMPTS TO GAUGE CAMPUS ATTITUDE TOWARD LGBT COMMUNITYPAGE A3

    MCCOYPROFESSOR'S HOUSE FIRE INSPIRES WKU TO COME TOGETHERPAGE A6

    HOUSING GUIDEMAKE SURE TO PICK UP OUR

    HOUSING GUIDE ON THURSDAY

    MONOLOGUEVAGINA MONOLOGUES ADDRESSFEMALE EXPERIENCESPAGE A3

    TUE 64/50

    WED 57/34

    THU 63/37

    FRI 72/46

    BY TREY CRUMBIENEWS@WKUHERALD.COM

    Students with the late nightmunchies will be happy to knowthat theyll have a place to eat oncampus for the next two weeks.

    Einstein Bros Bagels will have asoft opening from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.Sundays through Thursdays, in ad-dition to its normal hours.

    Steve Hoyng, resident districtmanager for Aramark, said the de-cision was made due to feedbackfrom students.

    Theyve asked for something tobe open and the Mass Media build-ing is conducive due to the fact ithas a 24-hour study hall, so thatswhy we picked Einsteins, Hoyngsaid.

    Einstein to have overnight hours

    BY SHLEBY ROGERSNEWS@WKUHERALD.COM

    Students receiving Kentucky state fi nancial aid could receive less money over the next two years with the proposed state budget.

    Since 2009, state fi nancial aid programs have lost $100 million from diverted lottery proceeds, and might take an additional $76 million hit over the next two years under Gov. Steve Beshears current budget proposal.

    WKU students currently receiv-ing need-based aid will experience more competition for the funding and less money, according to a new study from the Kentucky Center for

    Students could lose $76M in KEES with state budget cut

    SEE EINSTEIN PAGE A3

    SEE BUDGET PAGE A3

    BY MACKENZIE PIRTLELIFE@WKUHERALD.COM

    Sitting in her living room, Mary Sparr is surrounded by memorabilia. Scattered records, leftover tour mer-ch, a mannequin clad with backstage passes ranging from Adele to Bowl-ing Green's Starry Nights, a Maker's Mark certifi cate dedicating a barrel of the Kentucky bourbon "to Young Mary's Record."

    These pieces from days gone by aren't just eclectic home decor,

    they're proof of an already budding career for the 2009 WKU graduate.

    Her success, however. hasn't just happened. While on the Hill, Sparr had a string of swtiched majors--six in all--before combining her many interests and creating an ideal career.

    I was a PR major for a period of time, I was a philosophy major at one point, the Liberty native said. The one thing I had consistently moved forward in was my English classes, while Id dabbled in all those other things because I was in-terested in them.

    Sparr, who spends her time run-ning a high-traffi c blog, promoting local artists, touring the country with

    traveling musicians and managing

    Alum finds work, pleasure in promoting good art

    Mary Sparr, a 2009 WKU graduate, runs the blog "Young Mary's Record." From travel to fashion to movies to music, Sparr said her aim is to write about the best stuff I know about at the time. MIKE CLARK/HERALD

    SEE YOUNG MARY PAGE A3

    SPORTS TOPPERS' SEASON ENDS IN HEARTBREAK PAGE B4

    LD.COM M MM MMMMMMMMM VOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOLULULULULULULULULULULULULULULULULULULULLUULULUULUUULULULULULUUULLUUUUUUUUUUULULUUUUULUUUUUUUUUUUULUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUMEMEMEMEMEMMMMMMEMEMMEMMMEMEEEMEMMMMMMMMMMEMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMEMMMMMMMEMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM 88888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888889 NO. 40

    4

    The Lady Toppers celebrate after their 61-60 victory against Arkansas State in the championship game of the Sun Belt Tournament Saturday at Lakefront Arena in New Orleans. This is their 17th NCAA tournament berth and their 10th Sun Belt Conference Championship. The Lady Toppers secured a place in the NCAA tournament with the win. They will play No. 5 Baylor Saturday at 5:30 p.m. CT in Waco, Texas. MIKE CLARK/HERALD

    60 Ark. StateWKU 61

    'HIPSTERHILLBILLY'

    LET'S DANCELady Toppers win fi rst Sun Belt conference

    title since 2008, earn NCAA tournament berth

  • MARCH 18, 2014A2 COLLEGE HEIGHTS HERALD

  • MARCH 18, 2014 A3WKUHERALD.COM

    BY JACKSON FRENCHNEWS@WKUHERALD.COM

    A Student Government Association proposal to take the Campus Pride In-dex, a survey measuring campus LGBT friendliness, has passed unanimously and been submitted to the Administra-tive Council.

    Scottsville senior and Student Identi-ty Outreach president Andrew Salman proposed the idea that WKU take the Pride Index to the Offi ce of Diversity.

    From there, he said, SGA senator Nicki Seay picked it up and proposed it to SGA.

    He said the purpose of the Index is to

    diagnose the areas in which the uni-versity is not meeting all the needs of its queer students so that we can begin to work on reversing that.

    While SGA's resolution was helpful, Salman said, the Index still requires further approval.

    We need the permission of Admin-istrative Council to take it, he said. SGAs proposal was just to recom-mend that we take it.

    Seay, a Crofton junior, said WKU has never taken the Index before.

    Whenever you take the Index, she said, the Campus Pride Index orga-nization kind of works with you to

    show, okay well this is what youre doing good on as far as LGBT policies are, heres what you could improve on, heres some fi rst steps, some things that are very low-cost or no-cost and so you just kind of keep retaking the survey, kind of working with that orga-nization to get your score up.

    She said when the Index suggests changes to make campus more LGBT friendly, the school will work toward making the revisions.

    The SGA proposal states that multiple LGBT students have recently reported instances of bullying, harassment or other activities that make them feel un-

    safe and unwelcome on campus.According to the proposal, several

    schools throughout the state have taken the Index, including the Univer-sity of Louisville, Morehead State Uni-versity, the University of Kentucky and Centre College.

    The Campus Pride Indexs website lists eight criteria to determine LGBT friendliness, which includes policy in-clusion, housing, campus safety and recruitment and retention efforts.

    Seay said the Administrative Council was supposed to look over the proposal yesterday, but said consideration will possibly be delayed.

    SGA supports proposal to take campus LGBT pride survey

    Hoyng said the menu will be limited, but all Grab-and-gos will be offered, as well as the top-selling bagels and sandwiches. Payment for these items will re-main the same during the soft opening.

    Hoyng said if the soft opening

    is a big success, Einsteins will remain open for the rest of the semester. Another decision will also be made whether or not to continue its hours for next semester because Red Zone in Downing Student Union will have extended hours as well.

    Hoyng said he is looking for-ward to the test-run.

    Were excited to see how it goes, Hoyng said.

    EINSTEINCONTINUED FROM FRONT

    Economic Policy. The two hardest-hit state programs

    would be the College Assistance Pro-gram (CAP), which assists lower-in-come students, and the Kentucky Tu-ition Grant (KTG), which focuses on private college attendees. The biggest fi nancial program offered by the Ken-tucky Higher Education Assistance Authority is the merit-based Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES) program.

    Not only is the state failing to fulfi ll its own requirements it is under-funding need-based programs even more once eligibility is taken into ac-count, Jason Bailey of the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy (KCEP)

    said. While KEES is fully fundedCAP and KTG are awarded on a fi rst-come, fi rst-served basis.

    KEES funding is in no danger from the proposed budget. All students meeting the criteria for the award will be guar-anteed their funds from the state.

    Approximately half of the states fi -nancial aid goes to the merit-based Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship program which was cre-ated in 1998. In 2012-2013, the average award was $1,180 per year to full-time students, and KEES recipients earn up to $2,500 per year.

    By law, all but $3 million of the lot-terys revenue funds fi nancial aid pro-grams. However, in 2014 alone the leg-islature diverted $24 million to fi ll holes in the state budget.

    An estimated $43 million will be di-verted in 2016 under the proposed

    budget, according to the Offi ce of the State Budget Director.

    Students may apply for state need-based aid such as CAP beginning Jan. 1 of each year, but the money typically runs out by February, greatly affecting community college students looking to transfer into one of the states public universities.

    Created in 1994, CAP serves as the states primary need-based fi nancial aid program but only receives a third of the funding.

    Currently, the Senate is debating the budget. The Houses version passed last week and did little to change the outlook for state public universities and colleges. While elementary in-structional materials and preschool funding decreased nearly $20 million in the House, that money was not re-allocated to public universities.

    In a separate report, the KCEPs Ash-ley Spalding noted that KEES funds typically go to higher-income students whose higher education isnt as depen-dent on receiving fi nancial aid.

    Higher-income students are not asprice sensitive as low-income students and typically will attend college wheth-er or not they receive scholarships, the report