Meendering Portfolio 2009

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Portfolio 2009

Text of Meendering Portfolio 2009

  • portfolio

  • 09.1999 - 04.2009JO

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    A building with presence, with a kind of mute awareness of its doors left ajar and windows open, finally seems attentive to our presence. Immensely patient, surrounding us with a benign otherness, it falls to hand, as Heidegger put it. Dimensioned and hinged just so, it meets us exactly. It waits for our return.

    Michael BenediktFor an Architecture of Reality

    portfolio

  • DESIGN narrative

    The most satisfying aspect of design is synthesizing owner and occupant needs into three-dimensional space. However, there is more to architecture than style or function. Great architecture is developed from an idea that gives meaning to the design. The overriding idea within a project creates a sense of cohesion that allows every decision to connect and fall into place. For me, the meaning of a project can be found in the quality of its detailing, response to its site, social awareness and its level of environmental stewardship.

    Designers are in a unique position as we enter into a critical time in our human history. We have the opportunity to shape the way people interact with their environment and promote environmental stewardship. I think there are four areas where designers can have the greatest influence in society. The first is being proactive and informing others of the changing paradigm in the construction industry. The proliferation of environmental stewardship is dependant on increased social awareness.

    The second greatest influence is in the way a design reflects its unique environmental conditions or context. A good design should be configured to capture daylight, prevailing breezes, and mediate solar radiation. Spaces should connect inhabitants to their surroundings and give them a heightened appreciation for their surroundings. Ultimately space needs to reflect its site, region and climate. The selection and specification of materials is another area where designers have a significant influence on the quality of a project. Building products can have extremely broad reaching

    impacts that begin in the manufacturing process. As designers it is our responsibility to specify materials that promote sustainable practices and do not adversely affect the people we design for. The quality of the materials and systems also play a large role in the embodied energy of design. The idea of life-cycle cost of building materials is gaining traction and when databases and easy to use tools are created it will give designers a deeper understanding of the materials they use.

    The final and most significant aspect of sustainable design is the lasting quality and relevance of the building or space. Architecture that reflects a profound social awareness will be timeless and therefore sustainable. We should strive to create designs that have a useful life of a hundred years and are readily adaptable to fit changing needs.

    I am excited to be in the design professions at this juncture. Designers are trained problem solvers. Our ability to conceive of multiple solutions for complex problems and our close connection to the building industry puts us in a position of leadership. We should welcome and strive to meet the challenge presented by William McDonough and Michael Braungart:

    Ask: How can we support and perpetuate the rights of all living things to share in a world of abundance? How can we love the children of all species--not just our own--for all time? Imagine what a world of prosperity and health in the future would look like and start designing for it right now. This is going to take us all, and it is going to take forever. But, then that is the point. -Cradle to Cradle

  • TABLE contents

    port-fo-li-o 2

    Section Title Collaboration Page DESIGN narrative 1 TABLE contents 2

    I LTD Springfield Station PIVOT architecture 3-4II International Quilt Center APM architecture 5-6III Ride Source Dispatch PIVOT architecture 7-8IV Western Beverage Inc. PIVOT architecture 9-10 V Roseburg Public Safety Center PIVOT architecture 11-14VI Tip-Top Building Office APM architecture 15-16VII PacNW Salmon Center ROBERT thallon 17-24 VIII State Office Renovation Study PIVOT architecture 25-26IX Omaha Vision Unlimited APM architecture 27-30X METRO Affordable Housing PIVOT architecture 31-36 XI Pinhook Flats APM architecture 37-38XII 22 Floors APM architecture 39-44XIII Marthas Vineyard Home Don corner 45-46XIV Gillespie Butte Housing PIVOT architecture 47-50XV Courtyard Typological Study LANCE lavine 51-54XVI Agents of Change Project ALISON kwok 55-56XVII ECOTRUST Rebuilt Green ECOTRUST Inc. 57-58XVIII BRING Chapel of Second Chances MICHAEL cockram 59-62XIX THANKS resources FAMILY friends 63

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    LTD Springfield StationSpringfield, OR

    Harriet Cherry & Tobias BarwoodPIVOT Architecture

    Springfield Station serves as a primary transfer hub bus service and is the eastern terminus for the new Bus Rapid Transit corridor, connecting Springfield and neighboring Eugene. A covered boarding platform accommodates 8 bus bays. A 5,200 square foot building houses a 2,000 square foot Guest Services Center, including restrooms for drivers and the public, a modest waiting area, and required space for station maintenance and administration. The remainder of the building houses a coffee shop and Burrito Boy Restaurant.

    Celebration of rainwater and daylight are apparent in all features of the site and building. Roof runoff is collected at central and expressive downspouts, spouted from scuppers, and allowed to trickle from roof edges into gardens. Anchoring the station and its central garden is a stainless steel rain funnel that sends rain water over a textured-glass column then across rivulets in the pavement below to the headwaters of the garden. Throughout the site, gardens and bioswales filter all storm water before sending it to the Mill Race. At the building, daylighting is emphasized by the extensive use of high-performance, clerestory glazing in the faade. The structure and mechanical systems are left exposed to create a space that feels light and open. Durable finishes such as polished concrete floors were chosen to withstand the many years of public use the station will receive.

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    LTD Springfield Station02.2005 - 06.2005

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    International Quilt Study Center & MuseumUniversity of Nebraska; Lincoln, NE

    Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture

    The International Quilt Study Center provides a dramatic setting for the study and display of quilts and a signature gateway to the East Campus of the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. The Center is a compact, three-story, brick build-ing combining simply massed volumes with a bowed facade composed of glass panels stitched together to create a large-scale pattern suggesting the activity within.

    The sequence for visitors is carefully orchestrated. The en-trance lobby provides access to restrooms, ticketing, a digi-tal gallery, and a seminar room beyond. A curved stepped ramp runs the length of the east faade, gently leading visitors to the dramatically shaped second-floor reception hall, a grand, light-filled space overlooking the landscaped forecourt and the East Campus beyond. The progression of visitors is meant to be a journey from the brightly lit entrance spaces to the recessed and protected gallery spaces beyond the second-floor reception hall.

    The building achieved LEED Silver status and was the first LEED certified building on the University of Nebraska at Lincoln Campus. I assisted in the LEED credit integra-tion, documentation and verification for this project. While there are many ecological design aspects to this building it was most challenging to meet daylighting and view require-ments while maintaining the stringent requirements for archiving textiles. Materials were selected for their high percentage of recycled content, durability, and low VOC content.

  • 6International Quilt Study Center & Museum03.2007 - 10.2007

    II

    FIRST FLOOR SECOND FLOOR THIRD FLOOR

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    Ride Source DispatchEugene, OR

    Kari GreenePIVOT Architecture

    Ride Source is a non-profit service in the Eugene and Springfield area that provides transportation for the elderly and handicapped.