PRINTED ELECTRONICS A PATHWAYTO FUNCTIONALLY RICH Tuesday AM Flexible Electronics2018-01-31PRINTED ELECTRONICS: A PATHWAYTO FUNCTIONALLY-RICH SYSTEMS. Vivek Subramanian. EECS Department. University of California, Berkeley

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  • PRINTED ELECTRONICS:A PATHWAY TO FUNCTIONALLY-RICH

    SYSTEMSVivek SubramanianEECS Department

    University of California, Berkeley

  • Why print? Low cost?

    Added functionality Integration spatially specific deposition Customizability digital printing Lightweight / robust / flexible

    Courtesy:G. Cho, Sunchon National University

  • Towards a viable printing technique

  • Understanding Gravure Printing

    Doctor blade

    Substrate

    Gravure roll

    Ink

    Printing direction

    Filling

    Wiping

    Transfer Spreading

  • Characteristics of Gravure Printing

    = Printed volume fraction:

    Capillary number

    Prin

    ted

    volu

    me

    frac

    tion

    1

    0

  • Gravure Scaling

    1500

    um

    12.55um

    1125

    um

    750u

    m

    7.42um

    9.17um

    *Gap/Width = 25%

    1um 2um 5um 5um 7.5um 10um

    Cell width:

    187.

    5um 3

    75um

    940u

    m

    6.98um

    1.91um

    3.35um

    *Gap/Width = 5%

  • Nanoparticles as printable precursors Nanoparticles generally show a reduction in melting point relative

    to bulk counterparts

    Additionally, nanoparticles may be stabilized in solution by encapsulating them in organic ligands, which may be removed after printing by subsequent annealing

    Achieved thin film conductivity as high as 70% of bulk @

  • Passive Components We have made numerous passive components for

    use in tagging applications.

    Close-up of inductor on

    plastic (Q > 30 have been

    demonstrated)

    Close-up of capacitor, showing 2 layers of gold separated by

    100nm of polyimide.

  • Printed Transistors

    Substrate

    Gate electrode is printed usinggold nanocrystals

    Substrate

    Low-temperature anneal forms gate stripeto edge of array (out of page)

    Substrate

    Polymer dielectric is depositedvia inkjet

    Low-temperature anneal forms S/D stripesand connections (in plane of page)

    Various active layers are deposited via inkjet

    Substrate

    Source / Drain contacts areprinted using gold nanocrystals

    Substrate

    Substrate

  • -30 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 201E-11

    1E-10

    1E-9

    1E-8

    1E-7

    1E-6

    1E-5

    1E-4

    Gate current

    Curre

    nt (A

    )

    Vg(V)

    Drain current

    Device Characteristicssat

    Imax/Imin (sat) lin Vt(V) Swing (V/dec)

    Average 0.58 2.77E+03 0.28 1.83 4.83

    STD 0.14 4.46E+03 0.05 0.68 0.59

    Number of devices: 19

    -30 -20 -10 0 10 20

    0.0

    2.0

    4.0

    6.0

    8.0

    10.0

    Tran

    scon

    duct

    ance

    (S)

    Gate voltage (V)

    0.0

    0.2

    0.4

    0.6

    0.8 S

    atur

    atio

    n m

    obilit

    y (c

    m2 /V

    sec)

    We are able to realize circuits running @ >1Mhz entirely using printing on flex

  • Novel devicesExploiting the advantages of printed materials

  • Printed healthcare analytics Thin film components needed in

    biological chips can be very efficiently printed

    Additive Processing- saves cost and time in fabrication

    Integration of diverse biological functionality and materialson the same substrate

    PCR:a) Printed Heatersb) Printed RTDs

    DETECTION:OTFT Sensors

    ELECTROPHORESIS:Printed Valves

  • Printed Heaters for PCR

    Average Resistance: 33Ohms

  • Printed Temperature Detectors

  • Printed Valves for Control

  • Integrated PCR Chamber

    16

  • PCR Demonstration

  • Printed Power Sources Weve made printed batteries with energy density better than

    thin film Li.

    1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 80000

    0.2

    0.4

    0.6

    0.8

    1

    1.2

    1.4

    1.6

    1.8

    Time (seconds)

    Vol

    tage

    (Vol

    ts)

    Internal resistance: 24 OhmsSilver oxide utilization: 94%

  • The coming convergence

    Novel Materials New Manufacturing Paradigms Ubiquitous systems integrating

    Batteries Computation / Communication Sensing Interaction

    Printed Electronics:a pathway to functionally-rich systemsWhy print?Towards a viable printing techniqueUnderstanding Gravure PrintingCharacteristics of Gravure PrintingGravure ScalingNanoparticles as printable precursorsPassive ComponentsPrinted TransistorsDevice CharacteristicsNovel devicesPrinted healthcare analyticsPrinted Heaters for PCRPrinted Temperature DetectorsPrinted Valves for ControlIntegrated PCR ChamberPCR DemonstrationPrinted Power SourcesThe coming convergence