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  • Rising Wolf

    The White Blackfoot

  • I LKANIiD OUT AND FIRKIJ ^TRAlCiHT Al A BK, HEAD ^p. 105)

  • RISING WOLFTHE WHITE BLACKFOOT

    HUGH MONROE'S STORY OF HISFIRST YEAR ON THE PLAINS

    BY

    JAMES WILLARD SCHULTZ

    WITH ILLUSTRATIONSBY FRANK E. SCHOONOVER

    BOSTON AND NEW YORKHOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY

  • COPYRIGHT, 1918, BY THE SPRAGUE PUBLISHING COMPANY,

    COPYRIGHT, I9I9, BY JAMES WILLARD SCHULTZ

    ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

    \

    iCI.A53651i

    NOV

  • Contents

    I. With the Hudson's Bay Company 3II. The Sun-Glass 29

    III. Hunting with Red Crow 56IV. A Fight with the River People 79V. Buffalo Hunting 104

    VI. Camping on Arrow River 129

    VII. The Crows attack the Blackfeet 154VIII. In the Yellow River Country 179IX. The Coming of Cold Maker 205X. Making Peace with the Crows 230

  • Illustrations

    I LEANED OUT AND FIRED STRAIGHT AT A BiG HeADFrontispiece

    How Strange it seemed to me, a Boy, to sit inTHE Prow io

    As THEY SWEPT PAST US THEY SHOT THEIR ArROWS 1 56

    Hugh Monroe in his Old Age 252From a photograph

    The drawings are by Frank E. Schoonover

  • Introduction

    ONE of the greatest pleasures of my long lifeon the plains was my intimate friendship

    with Hugh Monroe, or Rising Wolf, whose tale ofhis first experiences upon the Saskatchewan-

    Missouri River plains is set forth in Rising Wolf

    just as I had it from him before the lodge firesof the long ago.

    At first an engage of the Hudson's Bay Company,

    then of the American Fur Company, and finallyfree trapper, Hugh Monroe saw more "new coun-try" and had more adventures than most of the

    early men of the West. During the last years of hislong life he lived much with his grandson, WilliamJackson, ex-Custer scout, who was my partner, andwe loved to have him with us. Slender of figure, andnot tall, blue-eyed and once brown-haired, he must

    have been in his time a man of fine appearance.

    Honest he was and truthful. Kind of heart andbrave. A good Christian, too, and yet with no small

    ix

  • Introduction

    faith in the gods of his Blackfoot people. And hewas a man of tremendous vitaHty. Up to the verylast he went about with his loved flintlock gun,

    trapping beavers and shooting an occasional deer.

    He died in his ninety-eighth year, and we buried

    him in the Two Medicine Valley, under the shadow

    of the cliffs over which he had so many times helped

    the Pi-kun-i stampede herds of buffalo to their

    death, and in sight of that great, sky-piercing

    height of red rock on the north side of the Two

    Medicine Lake, which we named Rising Wolf

    Mountain. It is a fitting monument to the man who

    was the first of his race to see it, and the great

    expanse it overlooks.

    J. W. S.

  • Rising Wolf

    The White Blackfoot

    HUGH MONROE'S STORYOF HIS FIRST YEAR ON THE PLAINS

  • RISING WOLFTHE WHITE BLACKFOOT

    CHAPTER IWITH THE Hudson's bay company

    YOU ask me for the story of my life. Myfriend, it would fill many volumes, for I have

    lived a long life of great adventure. But I

    am glad! You shall have the story. Let us

    set it forth in order. So ! I begin

    :

    I was born in Three Rivers Settlement,

    Province of Quebec, July 9, 1798. My fatherwas Captain Hugh Monroe, of the EnglishArmy. My mother was Amelie de la Roche,daughter of a noble family of French emigres.

    Her father owned a fine mansion in Montreal,and the large estate in Three Rivers, where

    my father lived with her what time he wasnot with his regiment on some expedition.

    3

  • Rising WolfMy childhood days were quiet enough. I

    played with the children of our peasantry;

    a Jesuit Father, resident with us, taught me

    a smattering of reading and writing in both

    French and English; and presently I got a

    gun, a beautiful, light smoothbore carrying

    thirty balls to the pound. From that* time

    on it was always the gun with me. I ceased

    playing with the peasant children, and spent

    the most of my time hunting in the greatforest surrounding the settlement. In mytwelfth summer I killed my first deer. I shottwo black bears when I was thirteen, and oh,

    how proud I was of that! An old pensionerof my mother's, a half-breed Montagnais In-dian, too old and feeble to do much himself,

    taught me to trap the beaver, the otter, and

    the land fur-bearers, the fox, fisher, marten,

    and mink, and I caught many of them. Every

    spring my Grandfather de la Roche sold thepelts for me in Montreal for a good price, one

    winter catch, I remember, bringing me in

    4

  • With the Hudson's Bay Companythirty pounds, which was a large sum for a

    boy to earn in a few months' time.' After the beginning of 1812 I saw Httle of

    my father, for then, you know, began the warbetween the English and the Americans, and

    he was with his regiment here and there, and

    took part in several battles. It was in the

    autumn of that year that my grandfather sentfor us to move in to Montreal and live with

    him.

    I did not like the town. I could neither

    hunt nor trap. I had little to do with the

    town boys; I did not understand their ways,

    so different from my ways. Mornings I at-tended the parish school; afternoons I rowed

    on the river, or visited in the warehouses of

    the Hudson's Bay Company, with which mygrandfather had much to do. There I metvoyageurs and trappers from far placesmen

    dressed all in buckskin clothes, with strangely

    fashioned fur caps on their heads, and beaded

    moccasins encasing their feet. Some were

    S

  • Rising WolfFrench, and some English, the one race hav-

    ing Httle to do with the other, but that madeno difference with me; I made friends withboth factions, and passed many, many pleas-

    ant hours listening to their tales of wild ad-

    venture, of fights with Indians, encounters

    with fierce bears of the Far West, and of peril-

    ous canoe trips on madly running rivers.

    "That is the kind of life I want to lead," I

    said to myself, and, young as I was, began

    to importune my mother to allow me to en-gage with the great company. At first she

    but laughed at me. But as winter and sum-

    mer and winter went by, and I never ceased

    my entreaties, not only to her, but to mygrandfather, and to my father when he visitedus, it became a matter not to be dismissed

    with idle jests.

    And at last I had my way. "He was bornfor the adventurous life, and nothing else,"

    said my father, "so we may as well let himbegin now, and grow up to a responsible posi-

    6

  • With the Hudson's Bay Companytion with the company. Who knows but hemay some day become its governor!"

    It was my mother who objected to mygoing. Many a tear she shed over the littletraveling-kit she prepared for me, and mademe promise again and again that I would

    return to her, for a visit at least, at the ex-

    piration of my apprenticeship to the company.It was a fine kit that she got together for me,

    changes of underclothes, many pairs of stock-

    ings, several pairs of boots, an awl, and needles

    and thread, a comb and brush, and a razor,strop, and brush and soap. *'You will need

    the razor later on. Oh, just think! My boywill be a bearded man when he returns to me !

    "

    "Not if I can keep the razor. I despise

    whiskers! Mustaches! They are unclean! Ishall keep my face smooth," I told her, andI have done so to this day.

    When the time came for my going my fathergave me a brace of silver-mounted pistols in

    holsters for the belt, and plenty of balls and

    7

  • Rising Wolfextra flints for them. My grandfather gaveme twenty pounds, and a sun-glass. ** There

    are times when flint and steel are useless, but

    as long as the sun shines you can always make

    fire with this," he told me. Little did we

    think what an important part it was to play

    in my first adventure upon the plains.At last the day for my departure came.

    We had breakfast by candlelight and thenmy grandfather took us and my kit downto the wharf in his carriage. I went into the

    office and signed articles of apprenticeship

    to the Hudson's Bay Company for five years,

    at twenty pounds per year, and found, myfather and mother signing as witnesses. Where-

    upon the chief clerk gave me a letter to the

    factor to whom I was to report without un-due delay, Factor James Hardesty, at Moun-

    tain Fort, Saskatchewan River, foot of the

    Rocky Mountains, the company's new fortbuilt for the purpose of trade with the Httle-

    known tribes of the ' Blackfeet, said to be a8

  • With the Hudson's Bay Companyvery numerous people, and possessors of a

    vast hunting-ground teeming with beaver and

    other fur animals.

    My mother almost fainted when she learnedhow very far away was my destination. Shewept over ' me, kissed me many times, andmade me promise again and again that I wouldreturn to her at the end of the five years. Andso we went from the office to the end of the

    wharf, where were the five big keel boats of

    the company, all loaded, and manned by thesturdy French and English voyageurs^ and Igot into one of them with my kit, smoothborein hand and pistols at my belt