Click here to load reader

Preparing Students for the 4th Industrial Revolution Implications for Science Education

  • View
    1.373

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Text of Preparing Students for the 4th Industrial Revolution Implications for Science Education

1

Preparing students for the 4th Industrial Revolution Implications for science educationAndreas SchleicherDirector for Education and Skills

1

PISA 2015 OECDPartners

2

the ability to engage with science-related issues, and with the ideas of science, as a reflective citizen Science in PISA

3

Trends in science performance (PISA)Below Level 1Level 1Level 3Level 4Lev5Level 2

450470490510530550570OECD averageStudent performance

4

Trends in science performance (PISA)Below Level 1Level 1Level 3Level 4Lev5Level 2

450470490510530550570

OECD average

5

Poverty is not destiny - Science performanceby international deciles of the PISA index of economic, social and cultural status (ESCS)Figure I.6.7% of students in the bottom international deciles of ESCSOECD median student

6

Students expecting a career in scienceFigure I.3.2

% of students with vague or missing expectations

7

Students expecting a career in scienceby performance and enjoyment of learningFigure I.3.17

8

9Looking forward to

9

The kind of things that are easy to teach are now easy to automate, digitize or outsource

10

Robotics

The Auto-auto>1m km, one minor accident, occasional human intervention

11

Augmented Reality

12

Education in the past

13

Education now

14

15ProfessionalismProfessionalism is the level of autonomy and internal regulation exercised by members of an occupation in providing services to society

15

Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic statusFig II.3.316

16 Policy levers to teacher professionalism

Knowledge base for teaching (initial education and incentives for professional development)Autonomy: Teachers decision-making power over their work (teaching content, course offerings, discipline practices)Peer networks: Opportunities for exchange and support needed to maintain high standards of teaching (participation in induction, mentoring, networks, feedback from direct observations)Teacherprofessionalism

16

Mean mathematics performance, by school location, after accounting for socio-economic statusFig II.3.317

17 Teacher professionalism

Knowledge base for teaching (initial education and incentives for professional development)Autonomy: Teachers decision-making power over their work (teaching content, course offerings, discipline practices)Peer networks: Opportunities for exchange and support needed to maintain high standards of teaching (participation in induction, mentoring, networks, feedback from direct observations)

17

Technology can amplify innovative teaching

18

19

19Thank you

Find out more about our work at www.oecd.org/eduAll publicationsThe complete micro-level databaseDiscover PISA 2015 results by country www.compareyourcountry.org/pisa

Email: [email protected]: SchleicherOECDand remember:Without data, you are just another person with an opinion

#

#Lessons from high performers

19