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IGNATIAN SPIRITUALITY

NAMASTE

FR VICTOR EMMANUEL, S.V J.

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IGNATIAN SPIRITUALITYAMDG

The word 'magis', a Latin word meaning better and greater, is found throughout Ignatius' writings. 'Magis' meant for him the effort to open one's heart more, to turn from one's own preoccupations, and to be generous in one's interest and regard for others. A greatness of heart

An old African proverb says: "God gives nothing to those who keep their arms crossed." 'Magis' means to turn away from mediocrity and to choose the path of love which is limitless, to give one's whole self, to love with 'all our hearts, our soul and our strength' (Luke10:27). Those who share in the Ignatian tradition know a restlessness always to be more open, to give, to question, and not simply to be content with the existing way of doing things.

It could make one crazy for power, driving one to cut-throat competition and corruption. All these result in ego-inflation, self-centredness. The more of the Ignatian Magis, on the other hand, is opposed to selfish attitudes and actions.

The Magis, a noun, has elided from the original adjective maiorem (greater) as found in AMDG: Ad Maiorem Deo Gloriam. MAGIS and AMDG are thus closely linked and complementary. It is this Ignatian combination of MAGIS-AMDG that gives a distinctive character to more.

For anyone impelled by the MAGIS-AMDG there is more to life than living! Maiorem greater means Gods glory always becomes more, not because of our achievement but because of who God is. The Magis essentially is not what we do for God but what God does in us and with us when we are open and responsive to Gods presence and power in our lives. Our co-creativity opens us to a glory that is the whole of creation.

Magis is one of the keywords for Ignatian spirituality. It is about living in a more enhanced, deeper, loving and passionate way with Jesus Christ. Translating this as more can be mistaken in the sense that one thinks it is about working more or doing more programmes. But that is exactly what it is not about. It is rather a deeper understanding of a more profound fellowship with Christ.

In other words, Magis for Ignatius is a relationship word, a word having meaning in terms of personal relationships, in terms of love, reverential love. For Ignatius, God-given love is the only thing, the only giving, that gives proper meaning to More! the love given freely, in generosity and always in reverence, just as God loves.

MR BISWAS BAIGA TRIBES IN MP

MR AABID SURTI SAVE WATER

MR ARUNACHALAM -SANITARY

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MS ARUNIMA SINHA -AMPUTEE

BB TIWARI - KUMBHMELA

MR DASHRATH MANJHI

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MR HARAKCHAND SAVLA

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MR K PRADIPKUMAR - HIV

A P J ABDUL KALAM

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DR AMBEDKAR

MS SUDHA CHANDRAN

MR D AMBANI

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MR NARYANA MURTHY

MR RAJINI KANTH

MS MAYAWATHI

MR PARAMESWARAM AND CHOODAMANI

KMR KALYANA SUNDARAM

MS SUNITHA KRISHNAN-RAPE VICTIM

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MS LAXMI GAUTAM-WIDOWS

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MS SWAMINATHAN

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MS NEELAM-HARYANA-BIRTH

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MR P SANTHAKUMAR- BURY DEAD

MS PRITHI PATKAR SEX WORKERS

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MS KS SAROJA CHILDREN -SILK

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MS SUBASHINI MISTRY

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MS SINDUTAI SAPTKAL-MP

Ten Elements of Ignatian Spirituality

Ignatian spirituality is one of the most influential and pervasive spiritual outlooks of our age. Theres a story behind it. And it has many attributes.

Ignatian spirituality is rooted in the experiences of Ignatius Loyola (14911556), a Basque aristocrat whose conversion to a fervent Christian faith began while he was recovering from war wounds. Ignatius, who founded the Jesuits, gained many insights into the spiritual life in the course of a decades long spiritual journey during which he became expert at helping others deepen their relationship with God. Its basis in personal experience makes Ignatian spirituality an intensely practical spirituality, well suited to laymen and laywomen living active lives in the world.

1. It begins with a wounded soldier daydreaming on his sickbed.

2. The world is charged with the grandeur of God.This line from a poem by the Jesuit Gerard Manley Hopkins captures a central theme of Ignatian spirituality: its insistence that God is at work everywherein work, relationships, culture, the arts, the intellectual life, creation itself. As Ignatius put it, all the things in the world are presented to us so that we can know God more easily and make a return of love more readily. Ignatian spirituality places great emphasis on discerning Gods presence in the everyday activities of ordinary life.It sees God as an active God, always at work, inviting us to an ever-deeper walk.

3. Its about call and responselike the music of a gospel choir.An Ignatian spiritual life focuses on God at worknow.It fosters an active attentivenessto God joined with a prompt responsivenessto God.God calls; we respond. This call-response rhythm of the inner life makes discernment and decision making especially important. Ignatiuss rules for discernment and his astute approach to decision making are well-regarded for their psychological and spiritual wisdom.

Ignatius Loyolas conversion occurred as he became able to interpret the spiritual meaning of his emotional life.The spirituality he developed places great emphasis on the affective life: the use of imagination in prayer, discernment and interpretation of feelings, cultivation of great desires, and generous service.Ignatian spiritual renewal focuses more on the heart than the intellect. It holds that our choices and decisions are often beyond the merely rational or reasonable. Its goal is an eager, generous, wholehearted offer of oneself to God and to his work.4. The heart has its reasons of which the mind knows nothing.

5. Free at last.Ignatian spirituality emphasizes interior freedom. To choose rightly, we should strive to befree of personal preferences, superfluous attachments, and preformed opinions.Ignatius counseled radical detachment: We should not fix our desires on health or sickness, wealth or poverty, success or failure, a long life or a short one. Our one goal is the freedom to make a wholehearted choice to follow God.

The Ignatian mind-set is strongly inclined to reflection and self-scrutiny.The distinctive Ignatian prayer is theDaily Examen, a review of the days activities with an eye toward detecting and responding to the presence of God. Three challenging, reflective questions lie at the heart of theSpiritual Exercises,the book Ignatius wrote, to help others deepen their spiritual lives: What have I done for Christ?What am I doing for Christ?What ought I to do for Christ?

6.Sum up at night what thou hast done by day.

Ignatian spirituality is adaptable.It is an outlook, not a program; a set of attitudes and insights, not rules or a scheme.Ignatiuss first advice to spiritual directors was to adapt theSpiritual Exercisesto the needs of the person entering the retreat.At the heart of Ignatian spirituality is a profound humanism.It respects peoples lived experience and honors the vast diversity of Gods work in the world. The Latin phrasecura personalisis often heard in Ignatian circles.It means care of the personattention to peoples individual needs and respect for their unique circumstances and concerns.

7. A practical spirituality.

8.Dont do it alone.Ignatian spirituality places great value on collaboration and teamwork. Ignatian spirituality sees the link between God and man as arelationshipa bond of friendship that develops over time as a human relationship does.Collaboration is built into the very structure of theSpiritual Exercises; they are almost always guided by a spiritual director who helps the retreatant interpret the spiritual content of the retreat experience.Similarly, mission and service in the Ignatian mode is seen not as an individualistic enterprise, but as work done in collaboration with Christ and others.

Those formed by Ignatian spirituality are often called contemplatives in action. They are reflective people with a rich inner life who are deeply engaged in Gods work in the world.They unite themselves with God by joining Gods active labor to save and heal the world.Its an active spiritual attitudea way for everyone to seek and find God in their workplaces, homes, families, and communities.

9. Contemplatives in action

10.Men and women for othersThe early Jesuits often described their work as simply helping souls.The great Jesuit leader Pedro Arrupe updated this idea in the twentieth century by calling those formed in Ignatian spirituality men and women for others.Both phrases express a deep commitment to social justice and a radical giving of oneself to others.The heart of this service is the radical generosity that Ignatius asked for in his most famous prayer:

PRAYER FOR GENEROSITYLord, teach me to be generous.Teach me to serve you as you deserve;to give and not to count the cost,to fight and not to heed the wounds,to toil and not to seek for rest,to labor and not to ask for reward,save that of knowing that I do your will.

Magis-driven leadership inevitably leads to heroism. Heroism begins with each person considering, internalizing, and shaping his or her mission. Whether one works within a large organization or alone, no mission is motivating until it is personal. And it is sustainable only when one makes the search formagisa reflexive, daily habit

. Amagis-driven leader is not content to go through the motions or settle for the status quo but is restlessly inclined to look for something more, something greater. Instead of wishing circumstanc