Introductin to EcoDesign - mtec.or. • There are a few simple rules to keep in mind: If you want

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  • (Introduction to EcoDesign)

    . ()

  • EcoDesign

    EcoDesign EcoDesign Tools

    EcoDesign

  • Sustainable Development

    Econ

    omy

    Soci

    ety

    Ecol

    ogy

  • Law for the Promotion of the Effective Utilization of Resources (Promote 3Rs)

    Basic Environment Law

    Waste Disposal and Public Cleaning Law

    Law on Promoting Green Purchasing

    Basic Law for Establishing the Recycling-based Society

    Containers and Packaging Recycling LawHome Appliances Recycling LawConstruction Materials Recycling LawFood Waste Recycling LawAutomobile Recycling LawFluorocarbons Recovery and Destruction Law

    Recycling lawsfor individual

    fields

    Japan legislation (all laws below are already enforced)

    Source: Eco-management Institute (Japan)

    NonNon--Tariff Barrier (NTB)Tariff Barrier (NTB)

  • EU Legislation

    Source: EGG 2004 + Materials

  • End-of-life

    management

    Specify %

    Reuse/

    Recycle/

    Recovery

    Prohibit 4

    heavy metals

    Auto-products

    ELV

    End-of-life

    management

    Specify %

    Reuse/

    Recycle/

    Recovery

    WEEE

    Prohibit 6

    heavy metals

    EE products

    RoHs

    EcoDesign

    with Life Cycle

    Considerations

    of Products

    All energy-use-products

    EuP

    Register

    Evaluate

    Authorize

    Control the

    uses of

    Chemicals

    REACH

    EU environmental directives for products EU environmental directives for products import/ export to EUimport/ export to EU2002 2005 2006 2007

    ELV WEEE RoHS EuP REACH

    2018

    :

    All chemical-use-productsEE products

  • Environmental Labels by third-party Organizations

    EcoEco--markmark International Energy StarInternational Energy StarSaveSave--energy labelenergy label

    FSC Forest FSC Forest accreditationaccreditation

    PET bottle recycling PET bottle recycling recommendation markrecommendation mark Certification of low Certification of low emission vehicleemission vehicle

  • Environmental Labeling by Self-Declaration of Businesses

    Environmental Labeling by Self-Declaration of Businesses

    NECNEC OkamuraOkamura ToshibaToshiba

    HitachiHitachiSONYSONY

  • AustraliaUSA

    Brazil Czech RepublicEU, UK

    Sweden (SSNC)

    New Zealand

    Republic of China

    Croatia Germany

    Hong Kong

    Japan

    Korea

    PhilippinesSingapore SpainThailand

    Canada

    Eco-Product

    Eco-Label EcoEco--LabelLabel

  • 1 1 ....

    : Clean Technologies In U.S. Industries, US-AEP

    VOC VOC 6 6 Sulfur dioxide Sulfur dioxide 9 kg9 kg Nitrogen oxide Nitrogen oxide 13 kg13 kg carbon dioxide carbon dioxide 1.5 kg1.5 kg HAPs HAPs 1.41.4--6.3 kg6.3 kg 7 7,250 L,250 L 2 2.8 kg.8 kg 5 5.3 kg.3 kg

    7,940 7,9407,940

    23.3

    23.3 400 400

  • Goals of (Eco) Design

    To design better products, in

    shorter time frame at lower cost ,for better quality of life and environment.

    Challenges : Trade-offHow Eco is it?Team-Oriented

  • Product Life Cycle Thinking

    Expands the traditional focus on manufacturing processes to incorporate various aspects over its entire life cycle.

    The life cycle of a product and closing the loop

  • Product Cost Commitment

    Time

    % o

    f Pro

    duct

    cos

    t com

    mitt

    ed

    Mar

    ket

    Dev

    elop

    men

    t

    Con

    cept

    ual

    Des

    ign

    Pro

    duct

    Des

    ign

    Man

    ufac

    turin

    g

    Cost incurred

    Cost committed

    100%

  • Eco-design has synonyms

    DfE: Design for Environment

    ECD: Environmentally Conscious Design

    LCA: Life Cycle Assessment

  • EcoDesign Paradigm Cradle-to-Grave

    MakeManufacturing, production, distribution, use

    WasteLandfill, incineration

    TakeRaw material extraction and synthesis

  • Raw Material Manufacture Distribution Use End of Life

    WeightVolumeMaterials usedProblematic material

    Production TechnologyProduction wasteSupply partsEnvironmentalperformance

    PackagingTransportation

    LifetimeFunctionalityUsabilityEnergy consumpWasteNoise, vibrationsEmissionsMaintenancereparability

    Fasteners, jointsDisassembly timeReusabilityrecycling

    Environmental parameters for product modeling

  • Guidelines for Ecodesign

    Do not design products but life cycles Natural materials are not always better Energy consumption: often underestimated Increase product life time Do not design products but services Use a minimum of material Use recycled materials Make your product recyclable Ask stupid questions

    Source:http://www.pre.nl/ecodesign/ecodesign.htm

  • 1. Do not design products but life cycles

    Do not design "green" products. Instead, you should design environmentally sound product life cycles. Think about all material inputs and energy use of a product during its whole life cycle. From cradle to grave, or even better from cradle to cradle!

    A simple way to document your findings is the MET matrix (Materials, Energy, Toxicity). Just write down some of the most important facts in a matrix.

  • 2. Natural materials are not always better

    It is common believe that "natural" materials are more environmentally friendly than "artificial" or man made materials. Is this always true?

    Of course, the production of 1 kg of wood causes less emissions than the production of 1 kg of plastic. But have you thought about the paint to preserve the wood, the energy needed to dry, the sawing losses?

    In some products, you would need about ten times as much wood than plastic. Plastics can often be recycled, wood cannot. Can you really compare on a kilogram basis?

    Environmentally sound materials do not exist, but environmentally friendly products and services do. Life cycle thinking helps a designer to develop these.

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  • 3. Energy consumption: often underestimated

    Many designers focus their attention on material selection. This is not always justified. If a product consumes energy in the use phase, there is a ten to one chance that energy consumption is dominant.

    Perhaps this simple example helps you understand: 10 kWh electricity needs 2 kg of oil. Making 1 kg of plastic needs 1.5 to 2.5 kg of oil. A coffee machine uses 300 kWh electricity during its

    lifetime, equal to 60 kg of oil. For the production of the machine less than 1 kg of plastic is used....

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  • 4. Increase product life time

    Make it more durable from a technical point of view

    Make it upgradeable (allowing to place the latest chip in a computer or washing machine).

    More importantly, try to design the product in such a way people will feel attached to it.

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  • 5. Do not design products but services

    People do not always want a product. They want a solution for a certain problem. A

    service rather than a product can be the right solution.

    For example, a car sharing system is a solution for people that need a car occasionally. Greenwheelsis getting very popular in the crowded inner cites of the Netherlands, where parking space is at a premium. You can use one of the cars in your neighborhood when you need it. Reservations are made with a phone call or online. You don't need to care about maintenance, insurance, parking licenses or road taxes. Payment is done on a monthly basis according to your use.

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  • 6. Use a minimum of material

    Using less materials may seem obvious, but it is more complex than you think.

    Often you can reduce the amount of material by critically looking at dimensions, required strength and production techniques. It can even be beneficial to use materials that have a high environmental load per kilogram, if you can save weight. This is particularly true in transport, where less weight means less fuel consumption.

    The Eco-indicator is one of the methods to make such assessments

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  • 7. Use recycled materials

    Do not only make your product recyclable, but use recycled materials as much as possible.

    If you and other designers only make a product recyclable, there will never be a demand for recycled materials in the future.

    If there is a demand for recycled materials the supply will follow certainly. BackBack

  • 8. Make your product recyclable

    Most products can be recycled, but only few are. Only products that are disassembled easily and have a high enough yield will be chosen for recycling. You can increase the chance that the product is recycled, by optimizing its design.

    There are a few simple rules to keep in mind:If you want to recycle thermoplastics:

    -Do not use a lacquer.-Do not use paper stickers on plastic.-Do not combine different plastics.

    If you want to recycle thermo-sets or textiles, think twice. It has no use. It is better to burn them and reclaim the energy.

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  • 9. Ask stupid questions! Very often decisions are based on common practice: "We have

    always done it this way and it has always worked well". You can make huge improvements in the environmental performance of products, with consequential cost savings, by simply asking the very obvious "Why?".

    Use the stupid question as a tool:

    A company used 3 kg of raw material to make 1 kg polyester. After asking the same stupid question ("why") again and again, it was discovered it could be done w