Medical Cannabis in Pennsylvania

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  • 1Senate bill 3: PROVIDING HOPe FOR THOse IN NeeD OF MeDICAl CANNABIs IN THe COMMONWeAlTH OF PeNNsYlVANIA.

    MEDICAL CANNABIS IN PENNSYLVANIA

    This guide is provided as a public service by Senator Daylin Leach and Senator Mike Folmer

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    WE hAVE BEEN tErrIBLY AND SYStEMAtICALLY MISLED for NEArLY 70 YEArS IN thE UNItED StAtES.for 3,000 YEArS MArIjUANA WAS A LEgItIMAtE MEDICAtIoN.

    - Dr. SANjAY gUPtAASSoCIAtE ChIEf of NEUroSUrgErY At grADY MEMorIAL hoSPItAL IN AtLANtA

    From the 8th to the 18th centuries AD, Arab physicians and scientists utilized the medicinal properties of cannabis hemp to treat a wide variety of conditions and illnesses including ear and skin diseases, epilepsy, and pain.

    During the mid-1800s, cannabis became an accepted therapy by Western medicine. By the beginning of the 20th Century, more than 100 papers had been published by physicians in Western medical literature, and it was a recognized treatment for over 100 separate ailments.

    Marijuana was officially removed from the U.S. Pharmacopoeia in 1942 after passage of the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937. This legislation severely limited the ability of physicians to prescribe the compound, and as a result, the American Medical Association became one of the most vocal opponents of the ban. In 1937, the AMA foretold of todays battle by saying;

    The obvious purpose of and effect of this bill [Marihuana Tax Act] is to impose so many restrictions on the medicinal use [of cannabis] as to prevent such use altogether. ... It may serve to deprive the public of the benefits of a drug that on further research may prove to be of substantial benefit.

    Marijuanas illegal position was solidified after Congress passed the 1970 Controlled Substances Act, which placed it on Schedule 1 in the same category with heroin and LSD, drugs deemed to have high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use.

    During the mid-1970s, Robert Randall, who suffered from severe glaucoma, found that cannabis relieved visual halos produced by the disease. In 1977, after painstakingly documenting the inability of conventional medicine to control his symptoms, Randall became the first patient to obtain government-supplied cannabis from what was to become known as the Compassionate IND program (investigational new drug). Cultivated at the University of Mississippi, the marijuana was rolled and packaged at the Research Triangle Institute in North Carolina under the supervision of the National Institute of Drug Abuse. By 1991, the program had 13 patients enrolled in it.

    In 1978, after a young cancer patient named Lynn Pierson brought marijuanas medicinal value to the attention of the New Mexico State legislature, the nations first law concerning medical cannabis was overwhelmingly passed. Many other states, including conservative ones like Florida and Louisiana, followed New Mexicos lead, and by December 1991, Massachusetts Governor William Weld signed the nations thirty-fourth state law recognizing marijuanas potential as medicine. All of these laws gained wide bipartisan support. Essentially, by 1991, 87% of legislators in 34 states had voted to end the prohibition of medical marijuana. However, many state efforts were effectively thwarted by federal drug agencies.

    As the AIDS epidemic spread in the 1980s, patients began to find that marijuana countered wasting syndrome and the nausea and vomiting that accompanied powerful AIDS drugs. Facing an onslaught of new applications from AIDS patients, the Public Health Service under the first Bush Administration quickly closed the Compassionate IND program to new patients in 1992. There were a dozen federal medical marijuana patients who were in the program before it was closed. Today there are four surviving patients who are still in this program. These patients receive a tin of 300 marijuana joints a month for their medical conditions from the Federal government.

    Frustrated by the closure of the Compassionate IND program and the federal obstacles that were placed in the way of implementing state programs, a group of California medical marijuana activists wrote Proposition 215 and placed it on the California ballot in the fall of 1996. The initiative passed by a margin of 56%/44%. Since then, similar initiatives have been passed in Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Maine, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington, all by significant margins. Maine, Nevada, and Oregon have successfully implemented programs.

    In 2014, SB1182 (the Raymond P. Shafer Compassionate Use Act, now SB3) passed the PA Senate Law and Justice Committee unanimously and the full Senate chamber 43-7. The bill died in the House. SB3 will be introduced this session (2015) in January.

    We need your help to pass this common-sense legislation and bring relief to suffering Pennsylvanians.

    MEDICAL CANNABIS: SB3hoPE for PENNSYLVANIAThe use of marijuana in some form has occurred for 10,000 years. Records show that the Chinese cultivated Ma (cannabis hemp) for fiber, medicine, and herbal use by the 27th century BC.

  • 5``` ABoUt MEDICAL CANNABISMeDICAl CANNABIs ReFeRs TO THe use OF MARIjuANA As A PHYsICIAN-PResCRIBeD THeRAPY TO ReDuCe THe PAIN OR DIsCOMFORT AssOCIATeD WITH sOMe MeDICAl CONDITIONs OR TO lesseN THe sIDe eFFeCTs OF sOMe TRADITIONAl MeDICAl TReATMeNTs.

    Medical marijuana is used for a variety of ailments and conditions, including, but not limited to:

    Easing nausea and vomiting. Stimulating appetite in chemotherapy and/or AIDS patients Reducing eye pressure in glaucoma patients Managing chronic pain Treating gastrointestinal illnesses

    CANNABIS AS MEDICINE

    Medical Cannabis is organically-grown, safe cannabis plant material which is free of pesticides, herbicides, and mold.

    One of the symptoms of serious illnesses is a lack of appetite. Often caused by other symptoms such as chronic pain or nausea, a lack of appetite can lead to weight loss and malnutrition, blocking a patients ability to heal.

    Medical researchers have performed over 20,099 studies on can-nabis. The natural compounds in Cannabis are non-toxic and safe.

    orgANICALLY-groWN

    StIMULAtES APPEtItE

    ProVEN SAfE AND EffECtIVE

    Some of the earliest research on marijuana and sleep shows that marijuanas main ingredient, THC, can significantly reduce the time it takes to fall asleep.

    hELPS WIth SLEEP AND ANxIEtY

    WHIle All PHARMACeuTICAl MeDICATIONs ARe CHeMICAllY CReATeD IN A lABORATORY, MOTHeR NATuRe CReATes ITs OWN MeDICINe IN CANNABIs.

    25% In states with Medical Marijuana, prescription painkiller deaths drop by 25%. DroP IN PAINkILLEr DEAthS

    Recent research has also suggested that some of the compounds in marijuana may have beneficial qualities for patients suffering from a variety of other conditions, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimers disease, breast cancer, brain cancer, Lou Gehrigs Disease, insomnia, and even asthma.

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    tYPES of CANNABIS

    THe eFFICACY OF CANNABIs Is DIReCTlY RelATeD TO sTRAIN seleCTION. CARe sHOulD Be TAkeN WHeN seleCTING sTRAINs THAT WIll BeNeFIT YOu. POTeNCY AND DOsAGe VARY WITH DIFFeReNT sTRAINs, CONDITIONs AND INDIVIDuAls.

    CANNABIS INDICA

    EffECtS

    SYMPtoM rELIEf Reduces pain Muscle relaxant Relieves spasms, reduces seizures Reduces inflammation Aids sleep Reduces anxiety and stress Reduces nausea and stimulates appetite Relieves headaches and migraines Reduces intra-occular pressure Bronchio-dilator and expectorant

    Promotes sedation, pain relief and relaxation

    Best for later in the day and bedtime Perhaps better for anxiety than depression

    CANNABIS SAtIVA

    EffECtS

    SYMPtoM rELIEf Reduces nausea Stimulates the appetite Fights depression Positive, uplifting, cerebral effect Energizes and stimulates Promotes creativity Relieves headaches and migraines Relaxes muscles, relieves pain Acts as an expectorant

    More stimulating and uplifting Energizing and thought provoking Increases focus and creativity Supports immune system Best for use in daytime

    tErPENES &CANNABINoIDS

    The effects these mechanisms produce vary from terpene to terpene; some are especially successful in relieving stress, while others promote focus and acuity.

    Terpenes are what you smell in the cannabis flower. These complex and flavorful smells are secreted in the same glands that produce cannabinoids like THC and CBD, terpenes are the pungent oils that color cannabis varieties with distinctive flavors like citrus, berry, mint, and pine.

    tErPENES

    Linalool Floral aroma Also found in lavender, citrus, rosewood, coriander, and

    laurels Anti-insomnia, anti-psychotic, anti-epileptic, anti-anxiety,

    and painkilling properties

    Caryophyllene Rich, spicy aroma Also found in Thai basil, cloves, and black pepper Anti-septic, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-

    inflammatory properties

    Myrcene Also found in mango, hops, bay leaves, lemongrass, and

    eucalyptus Sedating, relaxing effects Demonstrates promise in treating spasms, inflammation,

    pain, and insomnia Reduces resistance across the blood-brain barrier which

    facilitates access of other chemicals Enhances psychoactive effects of other compounds such as

    THC Myrcene levels are higher in indica strains than sativa

    strains (indicas typically push past 0.5% Myrcene)

    Limonene Bitter citrus aroma Also found in fruit rinds, rosemary, juniper, and peppermint Demonstrates promise in treating gastric reflux, fungus,

    depression, and anxiety

    Pinene Sweet pine aroma Also found in pine needles, rosemary, basil, parsley, and dill Demonstrates promise in treating asthma and inflammation

    Humulene Aroma similar to hops Also found in hops and coriander Anti-bacterial and anti-inflammat