Student Affairs Staff Orientation Tuesday, December 16 Wednesday, December 17

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Text of Student Affairs Staff Orientation Tuesday, December 16 Wednesday, December 17

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  • Student Affairs Staff Orientation Tuesday, December 16 Wednesday, December 17
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  • Agenda Tuesday Morning 8:30 a.m.Introductions 9:00 a.m.Transitions 10:00break 10:15 a.m.History 10:45 a.m.Campus Ecology NoonLunch-Make Yourself Known
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  • Agenda Tuesday Afternoon 12:45 p.m.Tour 1:45 p.m.Theory Anyone? 2:45 p.m.break 3:00 p.m.Social Contract 4:30 p.m.Principles of Good Practice
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  • Agenda Wednesday 10:30 a.m.Words of Wisdom 11:30 a.m.Ethics NoonLunch Our Students 12:45 p.m.Ethics 1:30 p.m.Multicultural Competence 2:15 p.m.break 2:30 p.m.Principles of Good Practice 3:30 p.m.Closure
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  • Introductions Name Department Favorite Food
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  • Learning Outcomes Increase understanding of the field of Student Affairs Increase understanding of engaging in Student Affairs work at Evergreen Enhance capacity to effectively serve students Increase familiarity with colleagues
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  • Ground Rules Take some risks Respect confidences shared If you need clarification, ask Have fun
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  • Transitions Theory William Bridges (1980) Transitions: Making Sense of Lifes Changes William Bridges & Associates wmbridges.com/index.html
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  • Transitions Integrates and builds on a number of theorists who studied human development, grieving, etc. Rites of passage found in ancient or other cultures as studied by Van Gennep (1960) are also frequently referenced.
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  • Rites of Passage Transitions Planned transitions Structured Understood transitions as the way to personal growth Regardless of culture always include: Separation Transition Incorporation
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  • Three Stages Transitions Ending Neutral Zone New Beginning
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  • Transition Transition is different from change Transitions are impacted by life stage Often parallel milestones of same-sex parent Transition begins when one lets go of what s/he has been Often repeat patterns from childhood and young adult experiences Not linear
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  • Ending Transitions Almost everything is easier to get into than out of. -- Agnes Allen, American Writer
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  • Ending Transitions Modern Western society handles endings poorly Must be dealt with if we are to move on to what comes next Termination process violates our belief that development has nothing to do with loss; only gain
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  • Ending Transitions Disengagement Disidentification Disenchantment Disorienation
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  • Neutral Zone Transitions One doesnt discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time. Andre Gide
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  • Neutral Zone Transitions Loss of relatedness, purpose, reality, motivation Empty, lost Old weaknesses reemerge Old reality looks transparent Nothing feels solid; often get mixed signals Tend to seek solitude and distance from distractions Fosters creativity and self-awareness Can be traced in the great figures of our world (e.g. Buddha, Muhammad, St. Paul, Dante, etc.)
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  • New Beginning Transitions The world fears a new experience more than it fears anything. Because a new experience displaces so many old experiences. The world doesnt fear a new idea. It can pigeon-hole any idea. But it cant pigeon-hole a real new experience. -- D.H. Lawrence, British Novelist
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  • New Beginning Transitions Come to the beginning only at the end Can be indirect and unimpressive We resist new beginnings; we fear real change Genuine beginnings begin within us Accessible to everyone and everyone struggles with them Can bring fear and conflict
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  • Top 10 Tips for Navigating Transitions (according to Bridges) 1. Expect and accept grieving 2. Define whats over and what isnt 3. Treat the past with respect 4. Seek support 5. Dont act for the sake of action 6. Recognize why you are uncomfortable 7. Seek solitude 8. Persevere 9. Revisit the purpose for the new beginning 10. Begin to identify yourself with the final result
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  • History QUIZ
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  • History 1. The first college in the U.S. was Harvard University founded in 1636. 2. The early colleges were founded to educate white men to serve as clergy and community leaders. 3. The original colleges in the United States were run by faculty. 4. The original colleges in the United States followed a model of college-student interaction inherited from England.
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  • History 5. In the early 1890s the first deans of men/women were appointed. 6. Enhanced access to higher education in the U.S. occurred after the Civil War and again after WWII. 7. In the 1960s and 1970s colleges in the U.S. shifted away from in loco parentis. 8. The first gathering of student affairs professionals occurred in 1903.
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  • History 9. Art Costantino is Vice President of the regional part of the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA). 10. The first senior student affairs position at Evergreen filled by John C. Finley in 1970 was titled Dean of Developmental Services.
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  • Campus Ecology Dynamic interaction of persons with the physical and natural factors and dimensions of the campus environment
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  • Ecological Perspective Concern for individual change Incorporates systemic import of environment Focus on the transactional relationship between students and their environment Assumes environmental change as well as individual change
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  • What conceptual tools do we use? Campus Ecology Behavior=f (S X E) Cognitive development SexPhysical Aesthetic development RaceSocial Identity formationAgeClimate Physical healthIntelligenceResidence Moral reasoningAptitudeOpportunities Interpersonal development InterestIncentives Etc. Supports
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  • Assumptions Campus Ecology Campus environment consists of all the stimuli that impinge upon the students sensory modalities and includes physical, chemical, biological, and social stimuli Students shape the environment and are shaped by it. Every student possess capacity for a wide spectrum of possible behaviors. A given campus may facilitate or inhibit any one or more of these behaviors. The campus should be intentionally designed to offer opportunities, incentives and reinforcements for growth and development. For purposes of environmental design, the shaping properties of the campus environment are focused upon; however, the students are still viewed as active, choice making agents who may resist, transform, or nullify environmental influences. Kaiser, L.R. (1975). Designing campus environments. NASPA Journal, 13, 33-39.
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  • Key Components of Human Environments Physical features Aggregate characteristics of their inhabitants Organizational designs Perceptions or constructions of those who participate in the environment Strange & Banning
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  • Steps Campus Ecology The ecosystem design process is the design or engineering component of the campus ecology perspective. There are seven basic ecosystem design processes. These are as follows: Step 1.Designers, in conjunction with community members, select values. Step 2.Values are then translated into specific goals. Step 3.Environments are designed which contain mechanisms to reach the stated goals. Step 4.Environments are fitted to the participants in the environment. Step 5.Participant perceptions of the environment are measured. Step 6.Participant behavior resulting from environmental perceptions is monitored. Step 7.Data on the environmental designs success and failures, as indicated by the participant perception and behavior, is fed back to the designers in order that they may continue to learn about person/environment fit and design better environments. Aulepp, L., & Delworth, U. (1976). Training manual for an ecosystem model: Assessing and designing campus environments. Boulder, CO: Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education.
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  • References Campus Ecology Aulepp, L., & Delworth, U. (1976). Training manual for an ecosystem model: Assessing and designing campus environments. Boulder, CO: Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education. Astin, A.W. (1993). An Empirical typology of college students. Journal of College Student Development, 34, 36-46. Astin, A.W., & Holland, J.L. (1961). The environmental assessment technique: A way to measure college environments. Journal of Educational Psychology, 52, 308-316. Banning, J.H. (Ed.). (1978). Campus ecology: A perspective for student affairs. Cincinnati, OH: NASPA Monograph. Banning, J.H., & Kaiser, L. (1974). An ecological perspective and model for campus design. Personnel and Guidance Journal, 52(6), 370-375. Clark, B., & Trow, M. (1966). The organizational context. In T. Newcomb & E. Wilson (Eds.), College peer groups: Problems and prospects for research (pp. 17-70). Chicago: Aldine. Costantino, A.A., & Nemeth, D.J. (1993). Enhancing the Built Environment to Promote Multiculturalism: A Collaborative Project. Journal of College Student Development, 34, 310-3