BIODIVERSITY COERVATIOnS n LESSONS .The Polynesia-Micronesia Biodiversity Hotspot is one of the most

  • View
    212

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of BIODIVERSITY COERVATIOnS n LESSONS .The Polynesia-Micronesia Biodiversity Hotspot is one of the most

  • Double programme de recherche sur les tortues marines

    de lArchipel de la Socit, Polynsie franaise

    Dual ReseaRch PRogRam on sea TuRTles of The socIeTy aRchIPelago fRench PolynesIa

    BIODIVERSITY COnSERVATIOn LESSONS LEARNED TECHNICAL SERIES

    11

  • Double programme de recherche sur les tortues marines de lArchipel de la Socit, Polynsie franaise

    BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION LESSONS LEARNED TECHNICAL SERIES

    11Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series is published by:

    Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) and Conservation International Pacific Islands Program (CI-Pacific)

    PO Box 2035, Apia, Samoa T: + 685 21593 E: cipacific@conservation.orgW: www.conservation.org

    The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of lAgence Franaise de Dveloppement, Conservation International, the Global Environment Facility, the Government of Japan, the MacArthur Foundation and the World Bank. A fundamental goal is to ensure civil society is engaged in biodiversity conservation.

    Conservation International Pacific Islands Program. 2013. Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series 11: Double programme de recherche sur les tortues marines de lArchipel de la Socit, Polynsie franaise [Dual Research Program on Sea Turtles of the Society Archipelago French Polynesia].

    Conservation International, Apia, Samoa

    Authors: Matthieu Petit, Te mana o te maona, Tahiti, French Polynesia

    Design/Production: Joanne Aitken, The Little Design Company, www.thelittledesigncompany.com

    Cover photograph: Pierre Lesage

    All photographs unless otherwise credited: Te mana o te maona

    Series Editor: Leilani Duffy, Conservation International Pacific Islands Program

    Conservation International is a private, non-profit organization exempt from federal income tax under section 501c(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

    OUR MISSION

    Building upon a strong foundation of science, partnership and field demonstration, Conservation International empowers societies to responsibly and sustainably care for nature for the well-being of humanity.

    ISBN 9789829130112

    2013 Conservation International

    All rights reserved.

    This publication is available electronically from Conservation Internationals website: www.conservation.org or www.cepf.net

    The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of lAgence Franaise de Dveloppement,

    Conservation International, the European Union, the Global Environment Facility, the Government

    of Japan, the MacArthur Foundation and the World Bank. A fundamental goal is to ensure civil society is engaged in biodiversity conservation.

    mailto:cipacific%40conservation.org?subject=http://www.conservation.orghttp://www.cepf.net

  • This document is part of a technical report series on conservation projects funded by the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) and the Conservation International Pacific Islands Program (CI-Pacific). The main purpose of this series is to disseminate project findings and successes to a broader audience of conservation professionals in the Pacific, along with interested members of the public and students. The reports are being prepared on an ad-hoc basis as projects are completed and written up.

    In most cases the reports are composed of two parts, the first part is a detailed technical report on the project which gives details on the methodology used, the results and any recommendations. The second part is a brief project completion report written for the donor and focused on conservation impacts and lessons learned.

    The CEPF fund in the Polynesia-Micronesia region was launched in September 2008 and will be active until 2013. It is being managed as a partnership between CI Pacific and CEPF. The purpose of the fund is to engage and build the capacity of non-governmental organizations to achieve terrestrial biodiversity conservation. The total grant envelope is approximately US$6 million, and focuses on three main elements: the prevention, control and eradication of invasive species in key biodiversity areas (KBAs); strengthening the conservation status and management of a prioritized set of 60 KBAs and building the awareness and participation of local leaders and community members in the implementation of threatened species recovery plans.

    Since the launch of the fund, a number of calls for proposals have been completed for 14 eligible Pacific Island Countries and Territories (Samoa, Tonga, Kiribati, Fiji, Niue, Cook Islands, Palau, FSM, Marshall Islands, Tokelau Islands, French Polynesia, Wallis and Futuna, Eastern Island, Pitcairn and Tokelau). By late 2012 more than 90 projects in 13 countries and territories were being funded.

    The Polynesia-Micronesia Biodiversity Hotspot is one of the most threatened of Earths 34 biodiversity hotspots, with only 21 percent of the regions original vegetation remaining in pristine condition. The Hotspot faces a large number of severe threats including invasive species, alteration or destruction of native habitat and over exploitation of natural resources. The limited land area exacerbates these threats and to date there have been more recorded bird extinctions in this Hotspot than any other. In the future climate change is likely to become a major threat especially for low lying islands and atolls which could disappear completely.

    For more information on the funding criteria and how to apply for a CEPF grant please visit:

    www.cepf.net/where_we_work/regions/asia_pacific/polynesia_micronesia/Pages/default.aspx www.cepf.net

    For more information on Conservation Internationals work in the Pacific please visit:

    www.conservation.org/explore/asia-pacific/pacific_islands/pages/overview.aspxor e-mail us at cipacific@conservation.org

    ABOUT THE BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION LESSONS LEARNED TECHNICAL SERIES

    www.cepf.net/where_we_work/regions/asia_pacific/polynesia_micronesia/Pages/default.aspxhttp://www.cepf.nethttp://http://www.conservation.org/explore/asia-pacific/pacific_islands/pages/overview.aspxmailto:cipacific%40conservation.org?subject=

  • Location of the project in the Polynesia-Micronesia Biodiversity Hotspot

    The Pacific Islands Region

  • About the Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series 3

    Lessons Learned 7

    Double programme de recherche sur les tortues marines de lArchipel de la Socit, Polynsie franaiseDual Research Program on Sea Turtles of the Society Archipelago French Polynesia

    Remerciements 10

    Avant-propos 11

    I Introduction 12

    II Materiel et Methode 18

    II Resultats et Analyse 25

    IV Conservation et Sensibilisation 43

    V Discussion 47

    VI Conclusion 52

    VII Bibliographie 53

    1er Symposium international sur les tortues marines en Polynsie franaise: Rapport de synthse 59 Contexte du symposium 60

    Programme 61

    Liste des participants 63

    Liste des institutions reprsentes 64

    Les discours des officiels 65

    Rsum des prsentations et dbats 66

    Une annonce qui cre la confusion 70

    Et ailleurs ? Quelle approche, quel regard 72

    Les recommandations pour la russite dun plan de conservation 75

    Articles choisis 78

    CEPF Large Grant Final Project Completion Report 81

    Map: Location of the project in the Polynesia-Micronesia Biodiversity Hotspot 4

    Table des matires

    PART 1

    PART 3

    PART 2

    CONTENTS

  • www.temanaotemoana.org

    DEDICATIONThank you Lui Bell for your commitment to protecting the Pacifics natural heritage. We will continue to strive to protect sea turtles as you have done for so many years.

    TE MANA o TE MoANA

  • Project Design ProcessAspects of the project design that contributed to its success/shortcomings.

    Three key factors in project design may explain the success of project:

    The gathering and involvement of many categories of actors and stakeholders around the theme of sea turtle conservation. This involvement of local people has been made by the Symposium, the technician training and the awareness of communities in the studied islands. This concept of joint mobilization around a common resource was still not widespread in the field of research in Polynesia. But it has led to numerous requests for voluntary work and those requests have initiated the idea of Sea Turtle observatory in French Polynesia.

    The communication on the results achieved during the project. In order to enable stakeholders to incorporate these new data but also to allow people to participate in sustainable management of sea turtles, many communication supports have been realized (newspaper articles, movie, educational booklet being realization, passages in schools,). This information campaign was followed by a renewed public interest in these symbolic animals, which manifested itself by many accounts and testimonies on the web, radio and television and the creation of new working groups.

    The diversity of targeted data and study areas. All these data allow to have a unique database which help in identifying the important areas in terms of habitat use and turtle density. These data, insufficient for research of high scientific level (not enough data in time for example) have however enabled a comprehensive review and understand the priorities for research and conservation about this specie. New research projects and a PHD are currently being developed.

    Project ImplementationAspects of the project execution that contributed to its success/shortcomings.

    Nombreux partenaires logistiques pour le symposium Bonne adaptabilit en fonction des conditions de terrain, mto, Relais dans les les plus loignes en charge de lorganisat