Meta design hku5

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  • 1.META DESIGN Collective Self Construction for the People Fall 2013 MArch II Design Studio University of Hong Kong, Department of Architecture Hsieh Ying Chun/ Atelier-3 Studio

2. Open System and Prototype The concept of open system emerged with the Industrial Revolution and the Modernist movement. Its main discourse is to overcome the contradiction of mass production and the needs of housing diversity. It attempts to make distinction of buildings by function and component durability. It also offers varieties over time and adjusts flexibly according to individual needs in order to extend the lifespan of the building and allow for rational use. From rural China to India, to Africa to South America, majority of people spend lifelong saving blindly building concrete and brick houses that not only have a short life cycle, poor insulation, non seismic but also create wasteful consumption of natural resources. It is necessary to develop an open system as a common platform. Space, structure, and structuring principles are open and flexible: they should adapt to local conditions, incorporate local resources; deploy local traditional materials and craftsmanship. It should also integrate both the creativity and labor of the users and make it an interactive open system, as well as relying the establishment of the open system to prototype investigation as core design intention. 3. We created a catalogue of 24 prefabricated housing systems, including timber, precast concrete, steel and metal sheeting, analyzing their construction process, tectonic system, conceptual framework and practical outcomes. , 524 Catalogue of Industrial Prefabricated Systems 4. TIMBER / -Balloon Frame 1833- Present -Konrad Wachsmann & Walter Gropius: Packaged House/General Panel System 1941 -Paul Rudolph: Oriental Masonic Gardens 1970 -IKEA: BoKlok Homes 1996 -MUJI/NET: MUJI House 2004 -Lazor Office: Flatpak House 2004 5. Balloon framing Timber Methodology/ Construction Originated in USA, this method was an adapta- tion of the original post-beam system, by using studs and cross members, joint by nails. This method emphasizes the vertical member, from where each platform can be attached independently. This type of construction had very low cost, and required low skills, emphasizing a do it yourself methodology. pre-cut pieces parts: 15,000 weight: about 4 kg men needed to build: 2 or more days: few days for frame Pros Direct load path to the foundation Easy to build Less skill required Cons Longer members required Fire can spread more easily from floor to roof Requires scaffolding to work on top floors during construction Prototype development WIth the automobile industry develop- ment, the suburbs in America were able to develop. A quick and easy construction was needed, and the basic concept of singular family houses was created. The factory production facilited the system to be mass produced and to be distributed to each family. This method allowed people to build their own homes. possible layouts: 450 houses built: over 200,000 cost for one: 500- 5000 usd 6. TIMBER / -Balloon Frame 1833- Present -Konrad Wachsmann & Walter Gropius: Packaged House/General Panel System 1941 -Paul Rudolph: Oriental Masonic Gardens 1970 -IKEA: BoKlok Homes 1996 -MUJI/NET: MUJI House 2004 -Lazor Office: Flatpak House 2004 7. THE PART : BUILDING COMPONENTS WEDGE CONNECTOR from 3D Y-Shape to 2D 1941(Modified Scheme) 1942(Packaged House) 1939 (French Scheme) VARIATIONS OF PANEL PANEL Standardized 8 x 34 Panel VARIATIONS OF PANEL COMBINATION OF PANELS PACKAGED HOUSEPACKAGED HOUSE DESIGN OPEN SYSTEM It did not postulate a standard design. It was intended to generate a very wide range of design options, which could not, infact should not, be predicated in ad- vance. These design options were infinite but limited by the parameters of the con- struction system to a family of designs that were all rectilinear modular, panelized and low-rise. CONSTRUCTION CLOSED SYSTEM Its limited set of integrated components all stemmed from a single design source and ultimately would all have to be produced in one comprehensive factory. THE WHOLE : CUSTOMIZED HOUSE PACKAGED HOUSEPACKAGED HOUSE 8. GENERAL PANEL COMPANY PROGRESS LINE TRANSPORTATION INSTALLATION MANUAL BUILDING PART ON SITE TARGET GROUP: Under the free market of US that time, company like General Panel can never work for the real poor. The product serves for middle class or less well-off. Reason for Bankruptcy of General Panel Company FAILURE AS COMMODY IS PATENT A RISK FOR CUSTOMER? SOCIAL CONTEXT : FREE MARKET PACKAGED HOUSEPACKAGED HOUSE DEBATE ON TECHNOLOGYS ROLE Gropius believed that the technological progress that enabled a system was, essentially, an immutable force that inevitably had to be harnessed by humans to achieve their own goals. Gropius considered a humanist by many saw the machine as a poten- tially dehumanizing force that man had to control. Wachsmann, had a different perception of technology as a liberat- ing force in architecture. debate of technologys role in architecture continues today and uniquely embedded in the fabric of this modest proposal for prefabricated house. The planning of mans physical environment has to be based on the best use of the available technique,which in turn is based on our knowledge of and our ability to control energy; in other words, on our economy and on our science. Only when it uses such means can a building, in any age, be called modern. Anybody who is able to improve such methods, even in abstract terms, is indeed an artist. -- Konrad Wachsmann Men will always rebel at attempts at overmecha- nization which are contrary to life. But industriali- zation will not stop at the threshold of building. We have no other choice but to accept the challenge of the machine in all fields of production until men fi- nally adapt if fully to serve their biological needs. -- Water Gropius TECHNOLOGY v.s. HUMANITY PACKAGED HOUSEPACKAGED HOUSE 9. TIMBER / -Balloon Frame 1833- Present -Konrad Wachsmann & Walter Gropius: Packaged House/General Panel System 1941 -Paul Rudolph: Oriental Masonic Gardens 1970 -IKEA: BoKlok Homes 1996 -MUJI/NET: MUJI House 2004 -Lazor Office: Flatpak House 2004 10. Oriental Masonic Gardens Paul Rudolph, 1970 Wilmot Road, New Haven CT Area of the site : 120,000 sq. m Height of the building : 6.07 m Number of apartments : 148 Density : 0.0203% PaulRudolph-OrientalMasonicGardens Residences are grouped in fours around a utility core. In every home, a lower module contains living spaces. A second module above it houses two or three bedrooms. And a third module may be added, parallel to the lowest one, for additional bedrooms. This stacking organization creates a sheltered outdoor space for each unit. HORIZONTAL GARDEN 11. Project Description The trick is simply to build a unit with one set of walls that fold down to form floors and another set that swings up to enlarge the roof area. Rudolphs standard unit weights 11 tons and, with everything folded up, is 12 feet wide, 60 feet long and eight feet high. Moving it is quite within the capacity of a smemi-trailer . Plugged into a service core and folded out, this standard unit produces a flat measuring in total floor area 24 feet by 60 feet. It is complete except for the addition of prefabricated walls, largely floor-to-ceiling windows, and minor finishing covering the narrow fissures along the folding lines. TECTONIC SYSTEM PaulRudolph-OrientalMasonicGardens height living space reducing the number of required corridors to one every three floors. In each house, the lower module contains the living spaces, a second module contains over 2 or 3 bedrooms, and sometimes added a modulus parallel to first to accommodate the additional bedrooms. Pinwheel Orientat WINDOW DETAILS UNIT DESIGN In each house, the lower module contains the living spaces, a second module contains over 2 or 3 bedrooms, and sometimes added a modulus parallel to first to accommodate the additional bedrooms. UNIT DESIGN height living space reducing the number of required corridors to one every three floors. In each house, the lower module contains the living spaces, a second module contains over 2 or 3 bedrooms, and sometimes added a modulus parallel to first to accommodate the additional bedrooms. Pinwheel Orientation for the WINDOW DETAILS UNIT DESIGN 12. TIMBER / -Balloon Frame 1833- Present -Konrad Wachsmann & Walter Gropius: Packaged House/General Panel System 1941 -Paul Rudolph: Oriental Masonic Gardens 1970 -IKEA: BoKlok Homes 1996 -MUJI/NET: MUJI House 2004 -Lazor Office: Flatpak House 2004 13. 10 BOLOK smart living Bo Klok, which translates to clever living, is a facto- ry-built modular house design by IKEA which is currently sold in Sweden, Great Britain, Finland, Denmark, and Norway. The house is desined to be extremely affordable to allow low-income families the ability live in a clean contemporary environment similar to the lifestyle marketed through IKEA furniture. The Bo Klok comes in several different varieties which are all based on the same construction and delivery processes. Shown here is the apartment building style of Bo Klok. The success of the Bo Klok comes from their simple design, sturdy construction, social conciousness and low cost. PRE-FAB COMPONENTS ORGANIZATIONS 11 COMPONENTS RELATIONSHIP 14. TIMBER / -Balloon Frame 1833- Present -Konrad Wachsmann & Walter Gropius: Packaged House/General Panel System 1941 -Paul Rudolph: Oriental Masonic Gardens 1970 -IKEA: BoKlok Homes 1996 -MUJI/NET: MUJI House 2004 -Lazor Office: Flatpak House 2004 15. KENGO KUMA TECTONIC SYSTEMS KAZUHIKO NAMBA WALLS AND FOUNDATION 1 1. Concrete Foundation 2. Insulation layer 3. Cement and Sand 4. Rubble 5. Timber Floor 6. Timber Column Timber Column External Louvers Insulation 3 4 5 6 2 CASE STUDY - MUJI HOUSE The Autonomous Houses by Crystal Yiu and Ping Li CASE STUDY - MUJI HOUSE